Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 15

Book Full text available online for free

The links between social connections and wellbeing in later life

Authors:
SCRUTTON Jonathan, CREIGHTON Helen, INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
University College London
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

This report, the first in a two part series summarising UCL research and exploring the policy implications of the work, focuses on social relationships and subjective wellbeing. It highlights that the loneliest and most socially isolated individuals have consistently lower levels of subjective wellbeing than older people who are more socially connected. Both the size of an individual's social network and their frequency of contact with that network are positively associated with wellbeing over 6 years of follow up. While older people begin to see a rise in their wellbeing in later life, those who are socially isolated do not. The report addresses the wider context of these findings, highlighting how a rapidly ageing population could potentially lead to greater numbers of lonely and socially isolated older people if nothing is done to address this issue. It then explores the policy implications of the research, showing that while social isolation and loneliness among older people have been rising up the policy agenda in recent years, the true extent of the loneliness problem is not currently fully known as the government only measures loneliness among those in care or caring for others. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Integrating health and social care from an international perspective

Authors:
WATSON Jessica, INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre Global Alliance
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

This report draws on the ideas, issues and challenges of integrating care raised at the Conference on Integrated Care for Frail Older People held on 29th September 2011. The conference was organised by ILC-Netherlands in cooperation with the Leyden Academy, the Dutch Medical Research Council, Vilans (a Centre of Expertise for Long-term Care) and the International Longevity Centre Global Alliance. This report links to previous research conducted by ILC-UK on integrating health and social care (Lloyd and Wait, 2006). It examines the potential benefit of integrating health and social care services for frail older people in a global context. It highlights that while financial, cultural and logistical barriers exist, countries should continue to work towards integrating health and social care services given its possibilities for cost efficiency, freeing up acute healthcare facilities and benefits for service users. It covers: the need for integrated care; the current global context of care for frail older people; the benefits and challenges of integrating health and social care services for this group; and priorities for action in advancing the issue of integrated care worldwide (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

2030 vision: the best, and worst, futures for older people in the UK

Authors:
INDEPENDENT AGE, INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK, READY FOR AGEING ALLIANCE
Publisher:
Independent Age
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
15
Place of publication:
London

This report follows up points of view presented in the House of Lords Select Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change report, ‘.Ready for ageing?’ (2013), exactly a year ago. It looks ahead 16 years to illustrate two possible futures for older people in the UK, by presenting “best cases” and “worst cases” in respect of: attitudes to ageing; money; relationships; work and learning; health and care; lifestyle; and where we live. The best case scenarios look forward to see what the UK could look like in 2030, if we take the right decisions now to prepare for our ageing population. People will be healthier for longer, and older people could be contributing more to society – provided that we approaches the challenges of ageing positively and creatively. The worst case scenarios look ahead to 2030 to see how failing to take action now will impact on older people in each of the key themes identified. This report imagines the impact of policy failure on money, health, relationships and issues that are key to wellbeing if political parties cannot agree on how to tackle demographic change. It concludes by outlining three principles – long-termism, bipartisanship and inclusivity – that need to be adopted if we are to meet the challenges of an ageing society. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The relationship between mental wellbeing and financial management among older people: an analysis using the third wave of Understanding Society

Authors:
HAYES David, UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL. Personal Finance Research Centre, INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre UK
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This new analysis shows statistically significant relationships between age and both increased levels of mental wellbeing and people reporting they are managing their financial situation more comfortably. It corroborates previous research (C Fitch et al, in Mental Health Review Journal, 2011) suggesting that one in four people with mental health problems are in debt, while one in two people in debt have a mental health problem. This analysis also suggests that after controlling for a range of demographic and socio-economic characteristics, older people who are struggling to manage their finances have eight times the odds of having reduced levels of mental wellbeing. Fitch et al suggested that debt may be both a cause and consequence of mental health problems. This work supports the assertion that poor mental health is exacerbated by financial problems and, though questions of causality remain, indicates that mental wellbeing and financial management are inextricably intertwined. This working paper is published by the Personal Finance Research Centre (PFRC) at the University of Bristol and the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC-UK). The research has been produced as part of the ILC-UK and PFRC project on “financial wellbeing in older age” funded by the ESRC’s Secondary Data Analysis Initiative. It looks at the relationship between mental wellbeing and self-reported financial management among those aged 50 and over in the United Kingdom.1 These findings are drawn from the third wave (2011) of Understanding Society, a large social survey begun in 2009, which captures information on the social and economic circumstances, attitudes, and health, of the inhabitants of 40,000 households each year. This paper begins by examining how mental wellbeing among the over-50s varies with increasing age. It looks at self-reported financial management among the same age group, and explores the relationship between mental wellbeing and how well people feel they are managing their household’s financial situation. Finally, the researchers use regression analysis to assess the independent predictors of mental wellbeing; and the findings suggest a strong relationship between mental wellbeing and financial management. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Additional outputs from the pilot: tweet chats, vision statement and education and development framework

Author:
INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre UK
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This report contains three outputs from the Teaching Care Home pilot, which developed a Teaching Care Home model with five care homes across England to support them to become centres of excellence in providing person centred care through staff empowerment, education and training. The report presents a summary of two tweet chats with leaders in the care home sector on what a vision of a Teaching Care Home should be; the projects final Teaching Care Home Vision Statement, which was informed by the tweet chats and roundtable discussions; and a framework to deliver education and development in care homes, produced by Manchester Metropolitan University. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

What works? A review of the evidence on financial capability interventions and older people in retirement

Author:
INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre UK
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
42
Place of publication:
London

Commissioned by the Money Advice Service on behalf of the UK Financial Capability Strategy, this report reviews the evidence on financial education programmes and interventions designed to improve the ability of older people to manage their finances. The review focuses on what works for older people in the following areas: managing money day to day, covering maximising income and safeguarding from fraud; planning ahead and managing life events, including mortgages in retirement and equity release; and access to money management tools, financial products and services online. The report found that: programmes to help manage money day to day reported high levels of satisfaction, but evaluations were not of high quality; evidence of effectiveness in the area of maximising income was stronger, but interventions were all small community-based projects; and although there was evidence to suggest that interventions to increase access to money management tools and services online increased confidence amongst participants, the evidence was of lower quality. Based on the findings of the review, the report highlights some general principles that financial capability interventions targeting older people should adhere to. It also highlights the need for more high quality evidence which includes robust evaluation to measure the impact of effectiveness or level of behavioural change. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The emotional wellbeing of older carers

Authors:
SCRUTTON Jonathan, CREIGHTON Helen, INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
University College London
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

This report, the second in a two part series summarising research from the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London (UCL), focuses on the subjective wellbeing of older carers. The research finds that: long term caregiving was associated with declines in quality of life and life satisfaction for carers, and an increased risk of depression; and giving up caregiving was associated with increased depression amongst both male and female carers. The report addresses the wider context of these findings, highlighting how the ageing population could potentially lead to large increases in the number of older carers, with the number of carers over 65 already having risen by 35 per cent since 2001. It also highlights the day-to-day realities faced by many older carers, including a high risk of emotional distress; the loss of friends, either because of a lack of time to socialise or because friends were unable to properly understand the constraints and strains of caring; and potential health risks. The report explores the policy implications of the research, highlighting that few policies and support services are aimed at older carers specifically. The report suggests that more could be done to protect the emotional wellbeing and mental health of older carers, through appropriate support being provided at all stages of the caregiving cycle. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Challenges in the new world of pensions

Author:
INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre UK
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This brief explores the challenges posed by recent pension reforms, which have introduced flexibility in the defined contribution arena and opened up income options for retirees by allowing access to more of their savings through changes to flexible drawdown and trivial commutation rules. The state pension has also been overhauled with the introduction of a flat rate state pension of £144-a-week from April 2016 (to those who are eligible). While the reforms have been broadly welcomed they are not a panacea to the problems created by the UK’s ageing population and in fact present new challenges. This brief addresses a number of issues including: people’s underestimation of their longevity; under saving; the possibility that people may leave their pension funds as cash savings; and the need for people to work longer. For each of these challenges, the paper briefly outlines key solutions. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Retirement in flux: changing perceptions of retirement and later life

Author:
INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre UK
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
22p
Place of publication:
London

Retirement and what it means to be a citizen in an ageing society is changing. Traditionally, our understanding of retirement implies that people make contributions in their working life in return for support in later life. This think-piece argues that society needs to abandon the notion that people make contributions in their working life in return for support in retirement. Such an approach implies that retirement marks the point where older people’s contributions are no longer valuable. An ageing society, with many people living longer and healthier lives, means that contributions should continue into later life. This publication discusses the rights and responsibilities of later life, arguing that the concept of ‘gradual retirement’ may be better suited to an ageing society. Older citizens have a responsibility to remain in the labour market, where possible, to enable skills retention and minimise the fiscal burdens on taxpayers. Alongside this, they should have a right to support to enable longer working lives. Older people should have a right to remain in their own home, but it is fair that they should draw upon property wealth to help fund care costs where possible. In addition, there should be opportunities for older people to volunteer in ways that are flexible, enjoyable, and oriented towards utilising their skills.

Book Full text available online for free

Good neighbours: measuring quality of life in older age

Author:
INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre UK
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
13p.
Place of publication:
London

Increasing numbers of older people, higher expectations for a good life, and demands on health and social care services, have led to international interest in improving and measuring quality of life (QoL) in older age. Yet whilst QoL is a subjective concept, most attempts to measure it have been largely based on expert opinions. Research since 1999 has attempted to create a new measure of QoL, based on the priorities of older people. The statistical results of the research were supported by survey responses and qualitative interviews. This resulted in the addition of the subjective perception of having an adequate income, and of retaining independence and control over one’s life: having good social relationships with family, friends and neighbours; having social roles and participating in social, voluntary, other leisure activities; having good health and functional ability; living in a good home and neighbourhood; having a positive outlook and psychological well-being; having adequate income; and maintaining independence and control over one’s life. The report recommends that people need to engage in social activities, and build up their support networks from young age so that they have a stock of such social resources in later life.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts