Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 20

Book

Key issues in evolving dementia care: international theory-based policy and practice

Authors:
INNES Anthea, KELLY Fiona, MCCABE Louise, (eds.)
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
264p.
Place of publication:
London

This book focuses on theoretical, policy and practice issues which are predicted to become fundamental priorities in the near future, and how dementia care works across the globe. It explores the theory underpinning dementia care, the applications of theory in dementia care research, and how this research is influencing and shaping practice. The contributors are practitioners, policy influencers and researchers who analyse case studies from the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia, India, France and Malta with the aim of encouraging a dialogue and exchange of interdisciplinary initiatives and ideas. Their insights into how policy and national dementia strategies are developed, and the range of approaches that can be taken in practice, will provide a positive step towards ensuring that the needs of those with dementia are met, both now and in the future. This book is designed for practitioners, researchers, policy makers and students in the field of dementia care.

Journal article

Seeking the views of people with dementia on services in rural areas

Authors:
INNES Anthea, SHERLOCK Kirsty, COX Sylvia
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 11(5), September 2003, pp.37-38.
Publisher:
Hawker

Reports on research which sought views of people with dementia themselves on provision of services for them in remote and rural areas of Scotland. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 17 people with dementia. The study found that people with dementia were willing and able to give evaluations of the services they received. Highlights that services could be further developed by consulting with people with dementia themselves.

Book

Healing arts therapies and person-centred dementia care

Editors:
INNES Anthea, HATFIELD Karen
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
131p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Offering practical advice for arts therapists and health care professionals, this book emphasises the importance of putting the individual before the illness to provide holistic, person centred support for people with dementia. Contains contributions from music, dance and visual arts therapists.

Journal article

Technology, fun and games

Authors:
CUTLER Clare, HICKS Ben, INNES Anthea
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 22(4), 2014, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Hawker

This article reports on two technology groups commissioned by Bournemouth Borough Council and discusses observations of using commercial technology with people with dementia within the community and an assisted living care setting. A total of 14 technology sessions were delivered to 13 people living with dementia, led by two facilitators. One group was for residents in Dementia Specific Assisted Living Accommodation (DSALA) and the other group was for people with dementia living in the community (DC). Sessions lasted for two hours and were delivered weekly for six weeks. The groups were introduced to the technologies of Nintendo Wii, iPad's and Nintendo DS. Both groups were successful in engaging all participants with the technology to some extent. Adopting an person-centred approach and understanding the life histories, hobbies and current interests was an important factor. Physical aspects of some of the gaming equipment created barriers for use, such as screen size, touch sensitivity settings. Differences were also identified between the DSALA and DC groups. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Care home design for people with dementia: what do people with dementia and their family carers value?

Authors:
INNES Anthea, KELLY Fiona, DINCARSLAN Ozlem
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 15(5), July 2011, pp.548-556.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This study investigated the views of people with dementia in care homes, and their family carers, on aspects of building design that are important to them. Two focus groups were held in Northern Ireland, and four in Scotland, with a total of 40 participants – 29 with dementia, and 11 family carers. Carers, in general, discussed the features of a building they took into account when selecting a care home. Key themes reported by people with dementia and their family carers included how the space in the environment is used, including the presence or absence of certain design features. Outside space and way-finding aids were identified as positive features of the home, along with a general lack of concern about en-suite provision. The findings illustrated the complexity of building design as it must provide living space acceptable to people with dementia living there and family members who visit, as well as provide a workable environment for staff. The authors concluded that the findings should be considered by care home teams involved in the building or redevelopment of a care homes.

Book Full text available online for free

Promoting person-centred care at the front line

Authors:
INNES Anthea, MACPHERSON Suzi, MCCABE Louise
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
81p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

Recent policy developments highlight the importance of a more 'person-centred' approach within community care services. Within this framework, however, little attention has been given to the role played by frontline workers in delivering on these policy imperatives. Understanding the roles and experiences of frontline workers is crucial in understanding how frontline care can be made more 'person-centred'. The authors have looked at the barriers to and opportunities for promoting person-centred care for older people, disabled people and people from minority ethnic groups.

Journal article

Service provision for people with dementia in rural Scotland: difficulties and innovations

Authors:
INNES Anthea, et al
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 5(2), May 2006, pp.249-270.
Publisher:
Sage

The provision of health and social care services to people with dementia and their carers living in remote and rural areas has been neglected globally. Meeting the needs of people with dementia poses many challenges for service providers. Such challenges may be compounded by the difficulties of providing and accessing services in rural areas. This article explores the views of Scottish service providers drawn from the voluntary, statutory and private sectors. The findings highlight the difficulties relating to dementia and rurality faced by service providers in Scotland. The study also considers innovative measures reported by service providers. Such measures indicate that not only can the distinct challenges of dementia service provision be overcome, but also challenges posed by providing services to people with dementia and their carers in rural and remote areas. These findings extend the literature on rural dementia service provision. The article concludes with a consideration of the practice and policy implications of providing dementia services in remote and rural Scotland.

Book

Training and development for dementia care workers

Author:
INNES Anthea
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
117p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Presents a concise guide to running a training programme for dementia care workers. Outlines the key factors to consider in the design, delivery and implementation of a programme. Stresses the importance of getting to know the care settings in which the trainees will practise to ensure that the training has direct relevance to participants.

Journal article

Barriers to leisure participation for people with dementia and their carers: an exploratory analysis of carer and people with dementia’s experiences

Authors:
INNES Anthea, et al
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 15(6), 2016, pp.1643-1665.
Publisher:
Sage

Leisure has emerged as a prominent research theme within the growing body of knowledge on dementia, with a focus on physical activity. Yet participation in any form of leisure presupposes an ability to freely choose to partake in activities and to negotiate one’s way around key barriers. In the case of dementia, the ability to undertake leisure activities is subject to a greater range of barriers, structured in a hierarchical manner that contributes to social exclusion if not addressed. This study based on focus groups with people with dementia and their family members conducted in Dorset, UK illustrates a range of barriers to leisure participation. How to create or maintain leisure opportunities for those living with dementia where households affected by dementia do not adopt avoidance behaviour, compounding a sense of isolation and exclusion is a challenge. Leisure can be an important strategy framed as a form of resistance to the social disabilities experienced by those living with dementia and it is potentially isolating impact. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Discovering what works well: exploring quality dementia care in hospital wards using an appreciative inquiry approach

Authors:
SCERRI Anthony, INNES Anthea, SCERRI Charles
Journal article citation:
Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(13-14), 2015, pp.1916-1925.
Publisher:
John Wiley and Sons

Aims and objectives: To explore the quality dementia care in two geriatric hospital wards using appreciative inquiry with formal care workers and family members of inpatients with dementia. Background: Care models such as person-centred and relationship-centred care have been developed to explain what ‘quality’ dementia care should be. However, their usefulness and relevance to clinicians has been questioned. Design: Using an exploratory qualitative design within an appreciative inquiry framework, 33 care workers working in a geriatric hospital and 10 family members of patients with dementia were interviewed. Methods: Open-ended questions were asked to encourage care workers to narrate positive care experiences when the care was perceived to be at its best and to identify what made these experiences possible. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed whilst data were analysed thematically using a qualitative data analysis software to assist in data management. Results: Positive care experiences can be understood within five care processes, namely building a relationship between the ‘extended’ dementia care triad, providing ‘quality time’ and ‘care in time’, going the ‘extra mile’, attending to the psychosocial needs and attending to the physical needs with a ‘human touch’. Factors facilitating these positive care experiences included personal attributes of care workers, and organisational, environmental and contextual factors. Conclusions: This study provides an alternative and pragmatic approach to understanding quality dementia care and complements the body of knowledge on factors influencing dementia care practices in hospitals. Relevance to clinical practice: By understanding the components of quality dementia care and how these can be achieved from different stakeholders, it is possible to develop strategies aimed at improving the care offered to patients with dementia in hospitals. (Publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts