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Journal article

Purchasing power: getting the best for older people

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, November 2008, pp.26-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The authors discuss some of the challenges facing commissioners who are purchasing mental health services for older people. They briefly highlight some of the main complexities which include: the complexity of older people's identities; the make up of workforces; the difficult nature of work with older people; and the multiple agencies involved in working with older people. It is argued that consistent application of a long-term strategy, which allows the accumulation of small changes across agencies and disciplines, is likely to be the key to success. It sets out the issues that need to be addressed, the pitfalls to avoid, and examines a series of objectives for commissioners.

Journal article

The mental health of older people: taking a long view

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 16(5), October 2008, pp.4-13.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article sets out some of the challenges facing commissioners of mental health services for older people, and uses recommendations from a recent inquiry to outline possible commissioning objectives.

Journal article

National Dementia Strategy: a window of opportunity?: commentary on... National Dementia Strategy: innovation or reiteration?

Author:
ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 34(7), July 2010, pp.294-297.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This article is a commentary to the opinion piece by Hilton (in pages 292-294 of this journal issue). It states that Hilton makes very valid points about the National Dementia Strategy, and that many practitioners will sympathise with them. However, the National Dementia Strategy embodies a political commitment made by the government to an ageing society, and is the result of a long period of agitation and lobbying. It argues that the implementation of healthcare policies is frequently a long drawn out and messy process. There is no guarantee that its proposals will be implemented, given the vagaries of economies and the frailty of political will, but all of them could be. It concludes that the aim should be for gradual changes that produce qualitative shifts in the standards of dementia care.

Book Full text available online for free

Obstacles to improving visual health in older people

Authors:
ILIFFE Steve, KHARICHA Kalpa, MYERSON Sybil
Publisher:
Thomas Pocklington Trust
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
London

This publication summarises findings from research which aimed to explore the obstacles to improving visual health in an ageing population, and why screening does not lead to greater improvement.  A mixed methodological approach was taken. Data from earlier health promotion studies was used and qualitative data were collected from older people. The conclusions include a proposal for an educational intervention. The research was funded by Thomas Pocklington Trust and carried out at the Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London.

Journal article

What should you expect at your age?

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 132, March 2005, pp.6-8.
Publisher:
MIND

Discusses complaints of gross neglect of mental health services for older people and an alleged national scandal of ignoring their heightened suicide risk are often heard, asking what is going on and why such services are still seen as the Cinderella. Asks how things might be improved by the voluntary sector, drawing on its experiences and critical perspectives.

Journal article

The stage is set

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 6.3.03, 2003, pp.42-43.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Describes how the use of stages to describe the progress of dementia is often helpful when identifying the support needs for people with dementia.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Applying community-oriented primary care methods in British general practice: a case study

Authors:
ILIFFE Steve, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of General Practice, 52(481), August 2002, pp.646-651.
Publisher:
Royal College of General Practitioners

Health assessments for older people have become an increasing priority with the NSF for Older People. In response to low level of activity in primary care around health assessment for older people, Camden and Islington Health Authority initiated a project in 1996-97 to develop innovative primary care for older people. This article reports on the study which was conducted in four general practices. Results found all four practices identified problems needing attention in the older population, developed different projects focused on particular needs among older people, and tested them in practice. Patient and public involvement were central to the design and implementation process in only one practice. Innovations were sustained in only one practice, but some were adopted by primary care group and others extended to a wider group of practices by the health authority.

Journal article

Meeting the needs of older people living at home with dementia who have problems with continence

Authors:
DRENNAN Vari M., MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 18(4), 2017, pp.246-253.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the question of how to meet the needs of older people living at home with dementia who have problems with continence. The paper is focused on social care practice in community settings. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is practice focused and draws on the authors’ research and experiences in clinical care, workforce development and service improvement. Findings: This paper summarises research on incontinence and its negative effects on quality of life and care relationships. It describes the impact of incontinence in terms of social embarrassment, restricted social activity, extra work (such as laundry) and costs, but also distress. It links research with care practice, with a focus on people with dementia who may be at particular risk of both continence problems and of assumptions that nothing can be done to assist them. Social implications: This paper provides questions that could be addressed in commissioning and provision of services and argues that they need to be informed by care practitioners’ experiences. It provides details of sources of support that are available at national and local levels. Originality/value: This paper draws together research on continence and social care practice to provide a series of self-assessment questions for local services. It focuses on social care workers who are at the frontline of practice including personal assistants and carers. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social work with older people - reducing suicide risk: a critical review of practice and prevention

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 41(1), January 2011, pp.131-147.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Although suicide remains an uncommon event among older people in most developed countries, suicide rates do increase with age, mainly accounted for by the higher incidence among older men. This review draws on four existing reviews and a further search of the literature using a critical interpretive synthesis methodology that emphasises practitioner perspectives. It reveals three problems: a scarcity of research that takes a system-wide approach to suicide prevention in later life; a dearth of evidence about the social work contribution to reducing the risk of suicide in later life; and a noticeable absence of reference to social work practice in national guidelines for mental health practitioners. This absence of social work services from studies about later life suicide arises partly from concentration on medical, nursing and psychological literature and partly from the use of a hierarchy of evidence that grades research by quality of the science and stands to miss accounts of practice, let alone the experiences of older people. This article suggests that emphasis should be given to guideline development, and to improving sub-optimal care and support.

Journal article

Suicide in later life: public health and practitioner perspectives

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 25(12), December 2010, pp.1230-1238.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

A selective review of English language literature focusing on the epidemiology of suicide among older people was conducted. Papers were selected for their ability to shed light on the potential for prevention and practice from public health perspectives. The study found that whilst the majority of older people who commit suicide have major depression, suicide seems to be due to a combination of personality factors and co-morbidities, including chronic pain and disablement. It also found that there is little information about the involvement of older people in risk reduction or about harm minimisation approaches at patient and public participation levels. The authors conclude that practitioners need to be aware of risk factors for suicide in later life, and that public health approaches combined with practitioners' experiences of older people at risk may help minimise the risks of suicide in later life.

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