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Book

Older workers: statistical information booklet: Spring 2005

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
London

The majority of the results presented in this booklet are based on Labour Force Survey results for Great Britain in Autumn (Sep-Nov) 2004.

Book

Older workers: statistical information booklet: quarter two 2007

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
London

Baseline year – 1997 for lone parents, the over-50s and the lowest qualified; 1998 for people with disabilities and ethnic minority people. The employment rates for all these groups were lower than the national employment rate. Between 1997 and 2006, there has been a rise in the employment rates of the over-50s from 64.7 per cent to 70.9 per cent and of lone parents from 45.3 per cent to 56.6 per cent. The employment rate for the lowest qualified has fallen from 51.7 per cent in 1997 to 49.4 per cent in 2006.

Book Full text available online for free

Working age to pension age: service improvements for DWP customers moving onto state pension: government response to consultation on draft regulations

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
London

This Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) document details 6 positive responses to public consultation (DWP website, 01/02/2010-12/03/2010) of the draft Social Security (Exemption from Claiming Retirement Pension) Regulations 2010, due to become active on 01/11/2010. The draft allows DWP to contact certain customers prior to retirement age, for example, to continue payments without them needing to formally claim and to put off their pension claim and continue on Working Age benefit. DWP received responses from the, Scottish Council on Deafness (SCOD), Citizens Advice Bureau (Wales), Unite Federation, Durham County Council in England, Age Concern and Help the Aged, and Low Incomes Tax Reform Group. Government responses to the main points made by these respondents are detailed, but are not an authoritative interpretation of the law (only possible by the Court) and cannot be used for legal advice. For example, SCOD asked about provisions for deaf people regarding the proposed, pre-retirement communications, and confirmation that proactive contact and informed choice conversations, using British Sign Language, and Braille for the deaf-blind, with trained DWP staff have been trialled successfully, is given. Responses to discussions on the draft at the DWP Policy and Strategy Forum are also reflected upon in this document.

Book Full text available online for free

Empowering engagement: a stronger voice for older people: the government response to John Elbourne's review

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
48p.
Place of publication:
London

Older people are to have a bigger say in developing central, regional and local Government policies announced Rt Hon Rosie Winterton, Minister for Pensions and the Ageing Society today, in response to John Elbourne’s review of older people’s engagement with Government. A new national UK Advisory Forum on Ageing will give older people a direct line to Government to comment on new policy ideas, services, legislation and what areas they feel the Government needs to address

Book

Older workers: statistical information booklet: Autumn 2005

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
London

There are over 19 million people aged 50 and over in Great Britain. 8.8 million are aged between 50 and State Pension Age (SPA) and account for 24.9% of people aged 16 to SPA. 70.7% of those aged 50 to SPA are in employment. This is lower than the employment rate for people aged 25 to 49 (81.6%) but higher than those aged 16 to 24 (58.4%). 1.38 million individuals aged 50 to SPA are claiming sickness and disability benefits, and 132,000 are on benefits relating to unemployment. The difference between the employment rates of those aged 50 to SPA and all people aged 16 to SPA has decreased 0.6 percentage points to 3.9%, since Spring 2004. Older workers are more likely to be working part-time than the 25 to 49 age group. 25.2% of those in work in the 50 to SPA age group are working part-time compared to 21.2% in the 25 to 49 age group. Variations in older workers’ employment rates across English Government Office Regions and countries range from 76.1% in the South East Region to 60.6% in the North East Region. Self-employment is more common amongst older workers compared to the younger age groups. 17.5% of those in work in the 50 to SPA age group are self-employed, which is higher than the 25 to 49 age group (12.0%) and those aged 16 to 24 (3.6%). Older workers have spent, on average, 12.9 years in their current employment, which is longer than the younger age groups. Older people have fewer qualifications than their younger counterparts. 21.8% of the 50 to SPA age group have no formal qualifications.

Book

Helping people to work: easy read

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
36p.
Place of publication:
London

The Government has introduced benefit reforms that permit the disabled, single mothers and older people claimants to try out work, and to return to protected levels of benefit more easily if a job doesn’t work out. For those who are considered more work ready such changes make a real difference. This easy read book sets out their rights and obligations. However, fears persist among claimants that they may fall outside of the protection afforded by such rules or that their continued incapacity might be drawn into question if they try out work.

Book Full text available online for free

Fuller working lives: a partnership approach

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
50
Place of publication:
London

This publication encourages businesses to retain, retrain and recruit older workers and presents the benefits of a fuller working life. It explains how as the population ages, employers need to draw on the skills and experience of older workers to avoid loss of labour. It also explains how working longer can improve the health and wellbeing of individuals and result in an increase in income at in later life and retirement. It sets out a number of new recommendations directly from businesses to support older workers to remain in the workforce and to help employers retain, retrain and recruit older workers so they have fuller working lives. It also looks at the action individuals can take by developing new skills and training for a new career, or reinventing the notion of work by providing childcare for grandchildren or taking up volunteering. The report concludes by describing five actions the Government is taking to support older workers, which include: developing an evidence base on ways to support employers to retain, retrain and recruit older workers; supporting people who need more help to stay and return to the workplace, such as women, carers, people with long term health conditions and disabilities; and improving the Jobcentre Plus offer for older workers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Building a society for all ages: consultation response

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
25p.
Place of publication:
London

This document, written in response to 'Building a Society for All Ages’ published in July 2009 (a strategy paper addressing the problems and potential of the demographic changes consequent on the increasing longevity of the population), is based on 345 written responses to the government document. Divided into four chapters – ‘Creating a society for all ages’, ‘Preparing well for later life’, ‘Living well in later life’, and ‘The right support for those who need it’ – followed by a summary of consultation findings, this document outlines the next steps in delivering the strategy. Key points include a £2.9m ‘get digital’ programme, new employment measures aimed at over 50’s, promotion of age equality, better local service delivery, and a guarantee of free personal care for 280,000 older people.

Book Full text available online for free

Building a society for all ages

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
59p.
Place of publication:
London

In 2007 for the first time in the UK there were more people over State Pension age than children. This document was developed to ensure that as a society we are able to make the most of the demographic change. This will require a major cultural shift, where people are not defined by their age. This strategy sets out a programme of action to support the changes for individuals, families, the workplace, economy, public services and communities. Contents include: improving later life today; the challenge ahead, and a vision for the future; having the life you want; older people at the heart of families; engaging with work and the economy; improving financial support; better public services for later life; building communities for all ages.

Book Full text available online for free

Independence and well-being of older people: baseline report: a social portrait of ageing in the UK

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Corporate Document Services; Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
70p.
Place of publication:
Leeds

The implications of an ageing society are wide reaching. As well as ensuring financial security, it is equally important to promote wider well-being and independence for older people, both before and after retirement. Older people continue to contribute to the economy, society and their local communities and to enjoy active lives. Income is not the only factor – and often not the main factor – in ensuring a happy and fulfilling later life. Housing, health, care, transport and social contacts all play a crucial part in enabling older people to live life to the full. A set of indicators of older people’s independence and well-being that have been selected and cover  five domains a) Independence in supportive communitiesp; b) Healthy active living; c) Fairness in work and later life; d) Material well-being; and e) Support and care.

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