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Journal article

A community hub approach to older people’s housing

Authors:
EVANS Simon, et al
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 18(1), 2017, pp.20-31.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of housing with care schemes to act as community hubs. The analysis highlights a range of benefits, barriers and facilitators. Design/methodology/approach: Data are presented from the Adult Social Services Environments and Settings project which used a mixed methods approach including a review of the literature, surveys and in-depth case study interviews. Findings: Most housing with care schemes have a restaurant or café, communal lounge, garden, hairdresser, activity room and laundrette, while many also have a library, gym, computer access and a shop. Many of these facilities are open not just to residents but also to the wider community, reflecting a more integrated approach to community health and adult social care, by sharing access to primary health care and social services between people living in the scheme and those living nearby. Potential benefits of this approach include the integration of older people’s housing, reduced isolation and increased cost effectiveness of local services through economies of scale and by maximising preventative approaches to health and wellbeing. Successful implementation of the model depends on a range of criteria including being located within or close to a residential area and having on-site facilities that are accessible to the public. Originality/value: This paper is part of a very new literature on community hub models of housing with care in the UK. In the light of new requirements under the Care Act to better coordinate community services, it provides insights into how this approach can work and offers an analysis of the benefits and challenges that will be of interest to commissioners and providers as well as planners. This was a small scale research project based on four case studies. Caution should be taken when considering the findings in different settings. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Making care homes part of the community? An evaluation of the Gloucestershire Partnerships for Older People Project

Authors:
EVANS Simon, MEANS Robin, POWELL Jane
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 14(1), 2013, pp.66-74.
Publisher:
Emerald

The 'Care Homes, part of our community' initiative in Gloucestershire was one of 29 Partnerships for Older People Projects (POPPs) funded by the Department of Health between 2006 and 2009 with an emphasis on prevention and improved outcomes for older people. This paper provides an overview of the policy context and the project, which aimed to improve the integration of care homes with health and social care services and the wider community. It describes the local evaluation of the project, which adopted a mixed methods approach combining quantitative performance data with semi-structured stakeholder interviews and emergency bed use costings. It presents the findings in 3 specific areas: integrating care homes with the health community, improving links with the local public community, and the economic evaluation of its contribution to reducing overnight stays in hospital. It reports that the evaluation results suggest that the project made significant steps towards integrating care homes with the health and social care community, that training and support was provided to a large number of care homes and new integrated working practices were developed, and that cost savings were demonstrated through reduced hospital bed use.

Book Full text available online for free

Combining extra care housing with health care services at Barton Mews

Author:
EVANS Simon
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership. Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

This case study describes Barton Mews, a private development in partnership with a Primary Care Trust that provides extra care housing with a community hospital and GP practice. This approach of private engagement with extra care housing is currently relatively uncommon but is likely to become more prevalent as a way of meeting demand, particularly in the light of the projected increase in home ownership among older people. The case study outlines the facilities and highlights key learning points.

Journal article

Communities of place and communities of interest? An exploration of their changing role in later life

Authors:
MEANS Robin, EVANS Simon
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 32(8), November 2012, pp.1300-1318.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

In this theoretical paper the authors discuss the concept and definition of community, and in particular the meaning of community to older people. The paper examines past emphasis on the importance of communities of place for older people and emerging evidence for the growing engagement of older people in communities of interest linked to friendships, enthusiasms and their increasing spending power. It considers the importance of social interaction in the lives of many older people and government policy promoting social participation, civic engagement and active ageing. It also looks at the influence of the internet and the development of virtual communities of interest among older people. The paper argues for a reconceptualisation of community and a more sophisticated view of place and interest which acknowledges the impact of social, economic and cultural change on the lives of older people.

Journal article

Evaluating services in partnership with older people: exploring the role of ‘community researchers’

Authors:
EVANS Simon, et al
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 15(1), March 2011, pp.26-33.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article explores the role of older community researcher, and the experiences of those involved. It is a collaboration between an academic researcher and four older people who worked together on the evaluation of a pilot project in Gloucestershire, with the aim of making care homes part of the community. The article first presents an outline of policy and practice developments in relation to public engagement in research. Then, a description is provided of a research project that included recruiting and training older community researchers to carry out an evaluation of the Partnerships for Older People Project in Gloucestershire. The next section focuses on the experiences of the older people who carried out this role, including some of the benefits and challenges that were encountered. The article concludes with an examination of the implications for delivering meaningful public engagement in service development and evaluation, from the perspective of older people.

Journal article

'That lot up there and us down here': social interaction and a sense of community in a mixed tenure UK retirement village

Author:
EVANS Simon
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 29(2), February 2009, pp.199-216.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Research findings on retirement villages to date have indicated high levels of satisfaction among residents, but commentators have criticised this form of provision on the grounds that they are only an option for the better off. This paper reports a study of a retirement village that has attempted to address this issue by integrating residents from a range of socio-economic backgrounds and by making various tenures available in the same development. The paper begins with a brief history of retirement villages in the UK and an overview of the concept of community, including those of communities of place and interest and their role in social policy. The presented findings highlight a number of factors that impact on a resident's sense of community, including social interaction, the development of friendships, the built environment and the existence of common interests. The discussion focuses on the development of cross-tenure social networks and how residents' health and social status shapes community experience. It is concluded that the clustering model of mixed tenure is likely to emphasise differences in the socio-economic backgrounds of residents and that the success of retirement villages as communities depends on grasping the subtleties of the diversity of later life.

Book Full text available online for free

Integrating retirement villages with the local community at Painswick

Author:
EVANS Simon
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership. Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

This Housing LIN case study examines the approach of housing developer Osborne in seeking to understand the extra care housing market and engage with local authority commissioners. It explains the company's interest in the sector, the rationale behind the research project and the methodology employed, and discusses learning points for both local authorities and private sector partners.

Book Full text available online for free

Best practice in promoting social well-being in extra care housing: a literature review

Authors:
EVANS Simon, VALLELLY Sarah
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
35p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

This systematically conducted mapping review of 141 empirical studies was undertaken to inform a research project exploring social well-being in extra care housing. While highlighting gaps in the literature, and noting the preponderance of non-UK material in the review, it identifies some key elements of good practice, including: the availability of inclusive and diverse social and creative activities; the provision of venues for social interaction, such as a shop, restaurant and garden; imaginative and accessible design that promotes a sense of community; access to social networks beyond the housing scheme; opportunities for residents to be involved in decisions about care delivery and service development; and a person-centred approach to care provision.

Book Full text available online for free

A directory for promoting social well-being in extra care housing and other settings

Authors:
EVANS Simon, VALLELLY Sarah, CALLAGHAN Lisa
Publisher:
DH Care Networks. Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
25p.
Place of publication:
London

This directory aims to identify and promote good practice for achieving social well-being. It is aimed at people from many different backgrounds, including older people, informal carers, commissioners, planners, managers and architects. Although the directory was initially based on research into extra care housing, much of the information it contains is likely to be relevant to other housing with care settings. This directory presents some ideas for good practice in promoting social well-being, and is grouped into five themes: general considerations; social interaction; design and planning; funding issues; and models of care. Where appropriate these ideas are supported by signposts to further information such as the Department of Health’s Housing Learning.

Book

Community and ageing: maintaining quality of life in housing with care settings

Author:
EVANS Simon
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
162p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

This book explores the characteristics of extra care housing and retirement villages, and tracks their development  in the UK, the US and elsewhere. It examines their role in promoting quality of life for older people and the extent to which they are experienced as communities by the people who live in them. These issues are discussed in the context of theories of community and ageing, particularly in relation to the built environment and social interaction; Chapters include: What is community; Community and ageing; Housing with care communities in the UK; An international perspective on retirement villages; promoting a sense of community in housing with care settings; Diversity, community and social interaction; Changing communities and older people.

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