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Journal article

The household structure of the elderly population in Britain

Authors:
DALE Angela, EVANDROU Maria, ARBER Sara
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 7(1), 1987, pp.37-56.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Uses nationally representative data from the General Household Survey for 1980 to investigate the household structure of the elderly in Britain. Household structure is analysed in terms of its relationship to the marital status, age, gender, and physical disability of the elderly person. 79% of the elderly live alone or with their spouse only. As many as 95% of all the elderly in non-institutional accommodation retain their own households - of the rest, the majority move to live with married children, most usually daughters.

Book

Equity in health and social care

Authors:
EVANDROU Maria, et al
Publisher:
London School of Economics. Suntory-Toyota International Centre for Economics an
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
70p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Studies equity in the distribution of primary health care and domiciliary care for elders.

Book

The use of domiciliary services by the elderly: a survey

Author:
EVANDROU Maria
Publisher:
London School of Economics. Suntory Toyota International Centre for Economics an
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
62p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article Full text available online for free

The transition to living alone and psychological distress in later life

Authors:
STONE Juliet, EVANDROU Maria, FALKINGHAM Jane
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 42(3), 2013, pp.366-372.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Background: Living alone in later life has been linked to psychological distress but less is known about the role of the transition into living alone and the role of social and material resources. Methods: A total of 21,535 person-years of data from 4,587 participants of the British Household Panel Survey aged 65+ are analysed. Participants provide a maximum 6 years' data (t0−t5), with trajectories of living arrangements classified as: consistently partnered/ with children/alone; transition from partnered to alone/with children to alone. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12 caseness (score >3) is investigated using multi-level logistic regression, controlling for sex, age, activities of daily living, social and material resources. Results: After a transition from partnered at t0 to alone at t1, the odds for GHQ-12 caseness increased substantially, but by t3 returned to baseline levels. The odds for caseness at t0 were highest for those changing from living with a child at t0 to living alone at t1 but declined following the transition to living alone. None of the covariates explained these associations. Living consistently alone did confer increased odds for caseness. Conclusions: Living alone in later life is not in itself a strong risk factor for psychological distress. The effects of transitions to living alone are dependent on the preceding living arrangement and are independent of social and material resources. This advocates a longitudinal approach, allowing identification of respondents' location along trajectories of living arrangements. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Older men, work and health: reviewing the evidence

Authors:
GRANVILLE Gillian, EVANDROU Maria
Publisher:
Help the Aged
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
37p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The relationship between work and the health of older male workers is receiving too little attention, a new report has concluded. ‘Older men, work and health’, a report published by TAEN - The Age and Employment Network - and Help the Aged examines the role work plays in the lives and identity of men and the impact this has on their health, both in and out of work.

Book Full text available online for free

Local government and the demography of ageing

Authors:
EVANDROU Maria, et al
Publisher:
Society of Local Authority Chief Executives and Senior Managers
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
44
Place of publication:
London

This review on the demography of ageing and the role of local government focuses on the main opportunities and challenges posed by population ageing for policymakers at the local level, and the ways in which such opportunities and challenges might be addressed. The report discusses the characteristics of population ageing in the United Kingdom, using key indicators which are currently used in this area and pointing to the role of local government in safeguarding and improving the well-being of individuals across the life course and particularly in later life. It discusses the current understanding of what constitutes healthy ageing and considers the concept of need, and its measurement for academic and policy purposes. The report examines the importance of independent living and choice in housing arrangements in later life, and the challenges posed in this area by changing family forms and living arrangements in the United Kingdom, looking at the potential of innovative solutions such as tele-care and tele-medicine. A final section brings together evidence on the well-being and quality of life enjoyed by individuals across the life-course and in later life, drawing on different dimensions of well-being, such as economic and social well-being, and outlining the challenges associated with promoting well-being at the local level. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The timing of parental divorce and filial obligations to care for ageing parents

Authors:
SAGE Joanna, EVANDROU Maria, FALKINGHAM Jane
Journal article citation:
Families, Relationships and Societies, 3(1), 2014, pp.113-130.
Publisher:
Policy Press
Place of publication:
Bristol

This article explores how the timing of parental divorce within a child's lifecourse can influence the obligations they feel to care for their parents later in life. The majority of studies have suggested that parental divorce that occurs earlier in a child's life will have the most detrimental effect on their filial obligations. Drawing on life-history interviews with 23 midlife participants in Southampton (UK) the authors challenge this contention by demonstrating how midlife experiences of parental divorce have weakened adult children's relationships with their parents, and explore how this may impact on their future willingness to provide care. The research also demonstrate how deteriorating marital relations have resulted in some older parents 'living together apart' and becoming socially withdrawn, which has weakened relationships with their midlife adult children who, as a result, expect to feel less willing to care for their parents in the future. These findings are presented within the context of rising divorce rates in older age groups and an informal care gap in the UK. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Family ties: women's work and family histories and their association with incomes in later life in the UK

Authors:
SEFTON Tom, EVANDROU Maria, FALKINGHAM Jane
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Policy, 40(1), January 2011, pp.41-69.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Place of publication:
Cambridge

This article examines the relationship between the family and work histories of older women and their personal incomes in later life. The analysis uses retrospective data from the first 15 waves of the British Household Panel Survey. The association between women's family histories and their incomes later in life are found to be relatively weak, explaining only a small proportion of the overall variation in older women's incomes. Divorce, early widowhood and re-marriage are not associated with any significant differences in older women's incomes, while motherhood is only associated with a small reduction in incomes later in life. While there are significant differences in the work histories of older women with different family histories, this translates into relatively small differences in their personal incomes, because the types of employment career pursued by most women are not associated with significantly higher retirement incomes and because public transfers dampen work history-related differentials, especially for widows. On the one hand, this could be seen as a positive finding in that the ‘pension penalty’ associated with life-course events such as motherhood and divorce is not as severe as often anticipated. On the other hand, the main reason for this is that the pension returns for working longer are relatively low, particularly for women with few qualifications. The analysis suggests that women retiring over the next two decades are unlikely to benefit significantly from the additional years they have spent in employment, because most of this increase has been in part-time employment.

Journal article

Migration in later life: evidence from the British Household Panel Study

Authors:
EVANDROU Maria, FALKINGHAM Jane, GREEN Marcus
Journal article citation:
Population Trends, 141, Autumn 2010, pp.74-91.
Publisher:
Office for National Statistics

Using annual data from 17 waves of the British Household Panel Study (1991-2007), this study looked at the residential mobility, or the likelihood of changing address, demographic, socioeconomic and health details of adults over 50 years, including older people and very old people. The authors ask what new factors are associated with migration in later life, and try to link data from people in late middle age (50-59) right through to 'the oldest-old' (90 and over) who move within a 12 month period of other life course events such as changes in partnership status through, bereavement, divorce and/or remarriage and of course, the impact of retirement and employment status. The results are discussed and illustrated with data tables and graphs on the migration characteristics, household tenure, and self-reported health status (including detail on changes in health status and limiting long term illnesses). Those most likely to move are identified as 50-59 year olds and very old people who were 90 years plus. The authors describe this 'relationship driven migration' in the UK as 'likely to become more common in later life', with higher divorce and remarriage rates resulting in life course transitions.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Older international migrants: who migrates to England and Wales in later life?

Authors:
GREEN Marcus, EVANDROU Maria, FALKINGHAM Jane
Journal article citation:
Population Trends, 137, Autumn 2009, pp.33-40.
Publisher:
Office for National Statistics

This article explores the demographic characteristics of individuals who migrate to England and Wales from outside the UK at retirement age and contracts their profiles against those of the total residential population of the same age. The article focuses on characteristics such as ethnicity, marital status, housing tenure and health.

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