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Book Full text available online for free

Evaluation of the extra care housing initiative: PSSRU technical report

Authors:
DARTON Robin, et al
Publisher:
Housing Learning and Improvement Network; Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
71p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The Extra Care Housing Fund was established in 2003 by the Department of Health to develop innovative housing with care options to meet the housing, care and support needs of older people, while helping them to maintain independence in their own accommodation. The objective of this study was to evaluate new build schemes for older people which received capital funding from the Extra Care Housing Fund from 2004 to 2006. 19 schemes which opened between April 2006 and November 2008 in England were included. The evaluation examined the development of the schemes from their implementation and followed residents' experiences and health over time, also collecting evidence about the process and impact of new approaches to providing accommodation and care for older people. Information was gathered from residents and staff at each scheme, with follow-up surveys of all residents, and from the local authorities concerned and the housing associations managing the schemes. This technical report describes the data collection, including fieldwork procedures and data collection issues, and also covers data preparation and response.

Journal article

PSSRU/CHE survey of private and voluntary residential care and nursing homes

Authors:
DARTON Robin, WRIGHT Ken
Journal article citation:
PSSRU Bulletin, 8, October 1991, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit

Reports on a surveys carried out among private and voluntary homes and local authority residential homes, comparing characteristics of residents, dependency levels, and the relation between resident characteristics and variations in fees charged.

Book

PSSRU survey of residential accommodation for the elderly, 1981: design features and facilities provided by the surveyed homes

Author:
DARTON Robin
Publisher:
University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
50p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury
Book

PSSRU survey of residential accommodation for the elderly, 1981: general characteristics of the surveyed homes

Author:
DARTON Robin
Publisher:
University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
39p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury
Book

PSSRU survey of residential accommodation for the elderly, 1981: characteristics of the residents

Author:
DARTON Robin
Publisher:
University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
89p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury
Journal article

Great expectations: feedback from relatives and residents

Author:
DARTON Robin
Journal article citation:
Nursing and Residential Care, 14(10), October 2012, pp.534-538.
Publisher:
MA Healthcare Ltd.
Place of publication:
London

The media has distorted many people's perception of care services provided across the country. This article examines what residents and their families really think and how staff can better accommodate these views. Data were obtained from residents in 46 care homes in England. Overall, residents and relative expressed favourable views of the home, but a number of particular concerns were identified, including general housekeeping issues, the quality of meals provided, problems with staff being too rushed to give sufficient attention to residents or organise activities, and perceptions of abuse or mistreatment. The author concludes that management should ensure that sufficient staff are available to provide the care and support the residents required.

Book Full text available online for free

Health survey for England 2014: chapter 6 social care provision

Authors:
ROONEY Keeva, DARTON Robin, WITTENBERG Raphael
Publisher:
Health and Social Care Information Centre
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
11
Place of publication:
Leeds

This chapter presents results from the Health Survey for England 2014 about the provision of unpaid social care by adults aged 16 and over. This is defined as help or support provided to someone because of long-term physical or mental ill-health, a disability or problems relating to old age and excludes any help given in a professional capacity or as part of a job. The findings show that 17 per cent of adults provided unpaid help or support to other people, with women more likely than men to do so (20 per cent and 14 per cent respectively). Prevalence of providing unpaid care was lowest among those in higher income households and increased with decreasing income. Care was most commonly provided to a parent and men were more likely than women to provide help or support for a spouse or partner, with just under a fifth doing so. Most commonly, those who provided help and support said that they did so for between 1-9 hours in the last week. However, a substantial proportion of men and women provided more care, with 27 per cent providing 10 or more hours in the last week. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Improving housing with care choices for older people: the PSSRU evaluation of extra care housing

Authors:
DARTON Robin, et al
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 14(3), 2011, pp.77-82.
Publisher:
Emerald

This study evaluated 19 extra care schemes allocated funding from the Extra Care Housing Fund. Data was collected on the expectations and experiences of 1,182 new residents and demographic and care needs for 817 individuals who received a care assessment. Data was collected at 6, 18 and 30 months. Costs were estimated for individuals based on capital, care and support, and living expenses. Findings revealed that entrants to extra care were much less physically and cognitively impaired, on average, than entrants to care homes, although residents in several schemes had high levels of physical disability. Overall, residents appeared to have made a positive choice to live in a more supportive and social environment rather than responding to a crisis. Physical and cognitive outcomes for residents with similar characteristics to care home residents were better while costs equal. The authors concluded that extra care could provide a positive option for people planning ahead, but appeared less suitable for crisis moves.

Journal article

The characteristics of residents in extra care housing and care homes in England

Authors:
DARTON Robin, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 20(1), January 2012, pp.87-96.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Extra care housing has been viewed as a possible alternative, or even a replacement, for residential care. In 2003, the Department of Health announced capital funding to support the development of extra care housing, making funding conditional on participating in an evaluative study. This paper forms part of this evaluation. It presents findings on the characteristics of the residents, drawing on information collected on demographic characteristics and care needs for the residents at the time of moving into 19 schemes within 6 months of opening. The findings are compared to a 2005 survey of residents moving into care homes providing personal care. The findings show that overall the people who moved into extra care were younger and much less physically and cognitively impaired than those who moved into care homes, although a minority had similar levels of physical impairment. Overall, levels of severe cognitive impairment were much lower in all schemes than the overall figure for residents of care homes, even among schemes designed specifically to provide for residents with dementia. The results suggest that, although extra care housing may be operating as an alternative to care homes for some individuals, it is mainly providing for a population who may be making a planned move rather than reacting to a crisis.

Journal article

Slicing up the pie: allocation of central government funding of care of older people

Authors:
DARTON Robin, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 44(5), October 2010, pp.529-553.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article discusses how resources are allocated to local authorities, and how they are important in providing an equitable system of delivery of social care. A variety of approaches have been used in the past, and the most recent uses a ‘needs-based’ formula. The Department of Health for England commissioned research in 2004 to inform the improvement and updating of the formula. The results of individual-level analyses were compared with the results obtained from analyses of ward-level data on service users. Both analyses were affected by problems of data availability, particularly the individual-level analysis, and the Department of Health and the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister decided that the formula calculations should be based on the results of the small area analysis. Despite the differences in approach, both methods produced very similar results. The article outlines the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It highlights developments that could allow a normative approach to incorporate future policy objectives into formulae that, to date, have been based on historical data and service patterns.

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