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Older people's experiences of renting privately

Authors:
RUGG Julie, CROUCHER Karen
Publisher:
Age Concern; Help the Aged
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
36p.
Place of publication:
London

The strategic importance of the private rented sector in meeting the housing needs of older people and in extending their housing choices is likely to increase. This project used qualitative methods to explore the experiences of older people living in the private rented sector and considered ways in which the findings could be used to frame a private rented sector strategy for this age group. Thirty face-to-face interviews were undertaken with 32 people aged between 54 and 89 who were or had recently been living in the private rented sector. The findings showed that the experiences of older people in the private rented sector are highly diverse. The report considers: the variation of experience; affordability; property quality; care and adaptations; management standards; and security of tenure. It also proposes key elements of a private rented sector strategy including an accommodation register, advice on Local Housing Allowance, and monitoring of regulated tenancies. The report concludes that the strategy needs to be flexible and non-prescriptive, and that any interventions must not distort the rental housing market or dissuade landlords from renting to this part of the market.

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Review of sheltered housing in Scotland

Authors:
CROUCHER Karen, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This review of sheltered housing in Scotland has been undertaken by the Centre for Housing Policy and York Health Economics Consortium at the University of York for the Scottish Executive and Communities Scotland. The review was intended to address a number of questions relating to: the supply and condition of sheltered housing in Scotland; changes and barriers to change; costs of developing, maintaining, and staffing sheltered housing; issues relating to low or high demand; the changing role of sheltered housing; residents’ experiences of sheltered housing; and the future housing aspirations of older people.

Book Full text available online for free

Review of sheltered housing in Scotland

Authors:
CROUCHER Karen, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
159p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report provides a review of sheltered housing for older people in Scotland. It has been undertaken by the Centre for Housing Policy and York Health Economics Consortium at the University of York for the Scottish Executive and Communities Scotland. The review draws on both quantitative and qualitative data and covers an overview of the supply of sheltered housing in Scotland, the age, condition and suitability of sheltered housing provision, the demand for sheltered housing, the services provided and charges, residents’ experience of sheltered housing based on postal survey, key findings from site visits and interviews and focus groups with sheltered housing residents, external impressions of sheltered housing and the changing role of sheltered housing.

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Housing issues for older people in rural areas

Authors:
BEVAN Mark, CROUCHER Karen
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
26p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This paper or ‘think-piece’ has been commissioned by the Scottish Executive Development Department. Its aim is to offer expert reflections on the policy actions that might be inferred from the evidence base on older people’s housing and support needs in rural Scotland. Topics covered included: types of tenure and household size for older people in rural areas, housing and support service aspirations of older people in rural areas, information needs of older people in rural areas, relative cost of providing housing services for older people in rural areas, exploration of the barriers to delivering services for older people in rural areas, consideration of any potentially useful alternative approaches to service delivery that have been put in place, and consideration of the different ‘ruralities’ in Scotland. Suggestions for policy and practice for consideration by the Scottish Executive are outlined.

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Promoting supportive relationships in housing with care: summary

Authors:
CROUCHER Karen, BEVAN Mark
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Evidence has consistently shown that older people with high support needs, particularly those who have cognitive and sensory impairments, can be marginalised within housing with care schemes. This research looks at approaches to Housing with Care (HWC) in England and Wales, and how these communities are being made socially inclusive places to live, based on what older people with high support needs say they value and want. The report found that: communities are more likely to be inclusive when organisations have taken positive steps to promote a central ethos and culture of respect and tolerance of individuals; one of the ways of promoting respect and tolerance is by raising awareness of the experiences of people with conditions and impairments; organisations can take a number of steps to create an underlying environment that helps residents participate; and neighbourliness is key to supportive communities.

Book Full text available online for free

Promoting supportive relationships in housing with care: report

Authors:
CROUCHER Karen, BEVAN Mark
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
52p.
Place of publication:
York

Evidence has consistently shown that older people with high support needs, particularly those who have cognitive and sensory impairments, can be marginalised within housing with care schemes. This research looks at approaches to Housing with Care (HWC) in England and Wales, and how these communities are being made socially inclusive places to live, based on what older people with high support needs say they value and want. The report found that: communities are more likely to be inclusive when organisations have taken positive steps to promote a central ethos and culture of respect and tolerance of individuals; one of the ways of promoting respect and tolerance is by raising awareness of the experiences of people with conditions and impairments; organisations can take a number of steps to create an underlying environment that helps residents participate; and neighbourliness is key to supportive communities.

Book Full text available online for free

Making the case for retirement villages

Editor:
CROUCHER Karen
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
24p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

There has been a growing policy emphasis on promoting independence for older people, offering them choices, and improving their quality of life. Retirement villages are a relatively new type of provision in the UK, and data measuring their impact on residents’ health status and quality of life, or on the demand for other health and social care services, is limited. This report reviews the evidence to date on the impact of retirement villages. The report explores five key themes: the potential of retirement villages to enhancing older people’s choices for independent living; the particular benefits of larger developments and the potential for economies of scale; how retirement villages can be made accessible and affordable for a range of older people; the potential impact of retirement villages on local health and social services; and the impact of retirement villages on local communities. The evidence indicates that that retirement villages, although relatively new to the UK, have great potential to address main policy objectives around promoting independence, choice and quality of life for older people. This report is intended for all those engaged with commissioning and developing services for older people.

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Handypersons evaluation: interim key findings

Authors:
CROUCHER Karen, LOWSON Karin
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Communities and Local Government
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

Handypersons carry out minor home repairs and adaptations to help older and disabled people remain living independently in their own home. In 2009/10 the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) introduced a handypersons grant for local authorities in England. (£17m in 2010/11). This funding was designed to kick-start new services and to build capacity and range of services where they already existed. Alongside this funding, DCLG commissioned an independent evaluation of the national programme. This briefing summarises the findings from the first year of evaluation. It includes a review of the literature, surveys of local authorities and service providers, and case study interviews with key stakeholders, including service providers, in local authorities. These interim findings show that the DCLG funded handyperson schemes offer valuable services for older and disabled people. Emerging messages for success highlight: the importance of innovative management and effective teams; using feedback from clients; gaining the support of local communities and linking with other services and groups; promoting to a range of commissioners and other organisations; and demonstrating the preventative nature of handyperson services in avoiding costs elsewhere. The full report (due autumn 2011) will assemble evidence on setting up and operating successful services including a financial benefits toolkit.

Book Full text available online for free

Housing choices and aspirations of older people: research from the New Horizons Programme

Author:
CROUCHER Karen
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Children, Schools and Families
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
60p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report was commissioned by Communities and Local Government as part of a larger project to support the development of the National Strategy for Housing in an Ageing Society Researchers at the University of York undertook eight focus groups composed of 'younger' older people (aged 48 to 64), and 'older' old people (aged 65 and above) to explore the influences on participants' housing decisions, and their future housing intentions and aspirations. The groups were located in different parts of England, including rural, urban and suburban areas. Groups were purposefully recruited to include people who owned their own properties, or were renting from the social and private rented sectors, older people with disabilities, older people from black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, and older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender(LGBT) people.

Book Full text available online for free

Comparative evaluation of models of housing with care for later life

Authors:
CROUCHER Karen, et al
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
81p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

A study of seven different housing with care schemes for older people in England. A growing number of housing schemes for older people combine independent living with relatively high levels of care. However, there are questions about what, if any, model works best for older people. The authors examine how different models of housing with care address the needs of older people.The longitudinal study compares seven different housing with care schemes, including ‘village’ style and smaller schemes operated by a range of provider organisations in different locations. It considers: what makes schemes distinctive; services and resources; and how different needs for housing, care and support are balanced.

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