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Book

Mental health and well-being in later life

Authors:
CATTAN Mima, (ed.)
Publisher:
Open University Press
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
177p.
Place of publication:
Maidenhead

The contributors to this book ask what mental health and mental well-being is and discuss theoretical perspectives on ageing and health promotion; policy and practice in the promotion of mental health and well-being in later life; work, retirement and money; relationships; keeping active; and coping, choice and control: pathways to positive psychological functioning and independence in later life, ending with a conclusion.

Journal article

The delivery and management of telephone befriending services - whose needs are being met?

Authors:
KIME Nicky, CATTAN Mima, BAGNALL Anne-Marie
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 13(3), 2012, pp.231-240.
Publisher:
Emerald

Call in Time was a national pilot programme consisting of 8 telephone support projects for older people in England and Scotland managed by voluntary or charitable organisations and funded by Help the Aged. This article describes part of the evaluation of the programme which explored organisational issues and views of the individuals who managed the telephone support services. Information for the evaluation was gathered from project co-ordinators through semi-structured interviews and a Delphi style questionnaire survey (a structured group interaction process including opinion collection and feedback). The article discusses the study findings, including the four key issues which emerged from the data analysis: operational structure, promotion and publicity, recruitment of volunteers, and referral processes. It reports that project co-ordinators wanted more autonomy and the flexibility to respond to older people's needs, clear referral pathways linking voluntary and statutory bodies, long-term funding, and involvement of co-ordinators and older people in planning and delivery. It concludes that although the projects were found to provide a much-needed service for socially isolated and lonely older people, there were restricting factors which hampered the day-to-day operation of the services.

Book Full text available online for free

The needs of frail older people with sight loss

Authors:
CATTAN Mima, GIUNTOLI Gianfranco
Publisher:
Thomas Pocklington Trust
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
London

This briefing summarises the findings from research which explored the specific needs and aspirations of frail older people with sight loss. The original study consisted of a literature review, in-depth interviews with 24 frail older people living in care homes and sheltered housing schemes, and interviews with a manager and two wardens. The findings look at the research evidence to date; living with sight loss; living in supported accommodation with sight loss; service provision for frail older people with sight loss; and the conclusions and recommendations for further research. Key findings included that some older people struggled to retain a "will to live" in the face of increasing sight loss and frailty, frail older people needed help and support to come to terms with their sight loss, feelings of isolation were not uncommon, sight loss was compounded by other problems including mobility problems, and older people needed practical as well as emotional support to maintain their well-being.

Journal article

Promoting physical activity in the management of depression. The perspective of older people

Authors:
WRIGHT Alan, CATTAN Mima
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 6(1), April 2009, pp.53-67.
Publisher:
South West Yorkshire Mental Health NHS Trust and University of Huddersfield

While exercise has been widely proposed in the management of depression in older people, the subjective experiences of individuals participating in this intervention have been neglected. Similarly, little is known about the manner in which unsupervised physical activity is adopted by older people as they recover from an episode of depression. This qualitative study sought the views of 11 older people who had recently been admitted to hospital with depression and attended regular in-patient exercise groups. It was found that participants valued opportunities to exercise when in hospital and reported a range of benefits. Following discharge unsupervised physical activity played a crucial part in the recovery process and three typologies were defined which categorised participants’ motivation to be physically active. It was concluded that opportunities for older people to join exercise groups when hospitalised with depression are likely to be valued and that individual factors should be acknowledged when promoting post discharge physical activity.

Journal article Full text available online for free

What older people tell us about the role of physical activity in the management of depression

Authors:
WRIGHT Alan, CATTAN Mima
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 18(3), July 2008, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

Reports on a study which set out to explore the way in which older people admitted to hospital with depression experience exercise groups and the manner in which they engage in physical activity once discharged. Eleven participants aged 69 to 86 years were purposively selected using exercise group attendance records. The findings from this study support the use of exercise groups for older people admitted to hospital with depression. Community based interventions designed to promote physical activity in older people recovering from mental illness are most likely to be effective if they address individually identified functional goals and take into account the social needs of the older service users.

Journal article

Support networks for Chinese older immigrants accessing English health and social care services: the concept of Bridge People

Authors:
LIU Xiayang, COOK Glenda, CATTAN Mima
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 25(2), 2017, pp.667-677.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

As Chinese immigrants in the United Kingdom age, they experience an increasing need to access health and care services. It has, however, been reported that older Chinese immigrants have difficulties in accessing these services. This study explored the experiences of this population in using health and care services and the strategies that they adopted to address their difficulties. A grounded theory method with a two-staged research design was used. Stage 1 explored the participants’ experiences of ageing and use of health and social care services through focus group interviews. Stage 2 investigated the strategies individuals used to support access to and use of services through individual interviews. Forty-four older Chinese people and 15 supporters participated in interviews during August 2011 and May 2013. These older Chinese immigrants were challenged in knowing about and in accessing services. Their difficulties were attributed to language barriers, lack of information and instrumental support, and emotional and cultural issues regarding use of health and care services. Their supporters facilitated access to services and acted as a bridge between the service and the user; therefore, they were given the title ‘Bridge People’. Bridge People have different backgrounds: family and friends, public sector workers and staff from community-based Chinese organisations. The defining attributes of these supporters were: bilinguality, bicultural, multifunctionality and accessibility. There is no charge for this support; and the relationship between the Bridge Person and recipient involves trust and influence over decisions regarding use of health and care services. Bridge People should be recognised and identified by health, social care and housing services to promote engagement and use of services by older immigrant Chinese people. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The use of telephone befriending in low level support for socially isolated older people - an evaluation

Authors:
CATTAN Mima, KIME Nicola, BAGNALL Anne-Marie
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 19(2), March 2011, pp.198-206.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Telephone befriending schemes have long been considered an effective method to reduce loneliness among older people. This study investigated the impact of a national scheme for 40 isolated and lonely older people, involving 8 project sites in the UK. It assessed the impact of different models of telephone-based befriending services on older people's health and well-being. Findings revealed that the service helped older people to gain confidence, re-engage with the community and become socially active again. Overall, three main topics were identified: why older people valued the service; what impact it had made on their health and well-being; and what they wanted from the service. Also, nine subtopics emerged: life is worth living; gaining a sense of belonging; knowing they had a friend; a healthy mind is a healthy body; the alleviation of loneliness and anxiety; increased self-confidence; ordinary conversation; a trusted and reliable service; the future - giving something back. In conclusion, telephone befriending schemes for older people provide low-cost means for socially isolated older people to become more confident and independent and develop a sense of self-respect.

Journal article

How to assist residents with sight loss in your home

Author:
CATTAN Mima
Journal article citation:
Nursing and Residential Care, 13(2), February 2011, pp.91-93.
Publisher:
MA Healthcare Ltd.
Place of publication:
London

In-depth interviews with 24 older people aged 72-102 living in care homes and sheltered housing were conducted to investigate their specific needs. Reduced mobility and difficulties in carrying out every day activities were highlighted. Drawing on the findings, the author looks at how care homes can help residents with sight loss.

Book Full text available online for free

Care and support for older people and carers in Bradford: their perspectives, aspirations and experiences

Authors:
CATTAN Mima, GIUNTOLI Gianfranco
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
58p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

This study explored the needs, aspirations and expectations of older people and family carers from a range of ethnic communities in Bradford, regarding both formal paid care provision and help from family, friends and neighbours. It addresses 2 central areas of government policy and practice: the accessibility and acceptability of services to older people and their carers, and the barriers and facilitators to the take-up of services. Topics were explored by 21 focus groups comprising in total of 137 older people and 33 carers and in-depth interviews with 38 older people and 15 carers. The report covers the following subjects: self-reported care and support needs; experiences and expectations of support from family, friends and neighbours; and experiences and expectations of support from health and social welfare services. The study found that, irrespective of cultural or ethnic background, older people shared expectations about caring relationships and access to services, as well as similar experiences of service delivery. There was a sense that services were run more for the convenience and budgets of service providers than for the benefit of the individual older person. In addition, across all groups there was a desire for flexible, tailored services. Older people wanted more say in how and where they lived, the quality of their food, and who provided 'that bit of help' in their homes.

Journal article

Implementing change: the alleviation of social isolation and loneliness among older people in Leeds

Authors:
CATTAN Mima, INGOLD Kathryn
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 2(3), September 2003, pp.12-19.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Reviews key findings from research into social isolation and loneliness among older people and their implications for local strategic action to improve the mental health of older people in Leeds. The main findings described in the article focus on case study interviews with 23 project staff and focus group and individual interviews with older people. Local objectives arising from the study include raising awareness of social isolation and loneliness, challenging stigma and changing attitudes, improving and sharing good practice and working collectively to overcome practical barriers to social inclusion. The process has involved collating older people's views on loneliness, researching how to identify socially isolated older people, and identifying good practice. Concludes that while further national research is necessary, much information can be identified locally.

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