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Book Full text available online for free

Financial care models in Scotland and the UK

Authors:
BELL David, BOWES Alison
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
106p.
Place of publication:
York

The study begins by outlining current care policy for older people in the UK, and the development and context of free personal care in Scotland. It then explores the Scottish situation and finds that the similarities are sufficiently strong to argue that Scotland is a good exemplar for social care policies elsewhere in Great Britain. The practical problems encountered in Scotland during its introduction are assessed in detail, from the point of view of both the suppliers of care, and the older people themselves. Looking forward, the authors identify key threats to the sustainability of the Scottish policy and conclude by reviewing the wider lessons for the UK as a whole in designing policies to care for older people.

Book Full text available online for free

Support for majority and minority ethnic groups at home- older people's perspectives

Authors:
BOWES Alison, MACDONALD Charlotte
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2000
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

Re-thinking harm and abuse: insights from a lifespan perspective

Authors:
DANIEL Brigid, BOWES Alison
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 41(5), July 2011, pp.820-836.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The protection of children is a well-studied area, and practice in this area had been transferred to other vulnerable groups. However there has been little research into areas such as significant harm to children, elder abuse and domestic violence though a lifespan approach. This article, drawing on material presented during an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) seminar series, adopts a lifespan view to understanding harm and abuse and explores how this can reveal insights for a more generic understanding and practice in protection services. The article provides varying social constructions and varying recognition of concepts of harm and abuse. It explores responses to harm and abuse, and suggests that formal systems tend to present clear victims and perpetrators. Service categories can be unhelpful as they may not reflect experiences or address the wider contexts in which these are embedded. The lifespan approach provides a means for comparing and contrasting issues raised within specific areas of need and service delivery. It is a viewpoint which raises new questions about understanding harm and abuse and helpful insights which have implications for policy and practice.

Book Full text available online for free

Family support and community care: a study of South Asian older people

Authors:
BOWES Alison, DAR Naira, SRIVASTAVA Archana
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
101p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Family support and community care: a study of South Asian older people

Authors:
BOWES Alison, DAR Naira, SRIVASTAVA Archana
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2000
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

Cultural diversity and the mistreatment of older people in black and minority ethnic communities: some implications for service provision

Authors:
BOWES Alison, AVAN Ghizala, MACINTOSH Sherry Bien
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 24(3), 2012, pp.251-274.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article considers understandings and experiences of mistreatment of older people in black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. It describes a study which aimed to identify the impact of cultural diversity on understandings of mistreatment of older people and to explore the implications of these cultural factors for the provision of improved services to older people in BME communities experiencing maltreatment. The study included qualitative interviews conducted with 28 service providers and with 58 people from a wide range of BME communities. Following analysis of these interviews, a series of 7 focus groups involving community members and 1 involving service providers were conducted to explore the fit and gaps between the service providers’ views and the community experiences. The findings show that clear gaps exist between service provision and people experiencing mistreatment due to structural and contextual factors, with cultural factors having a relatively minor impact. Implications for good practice are discussed; these focus on more general processes of exclusion, both of BME older people and BME communities generally and the BME voluntary sector in particular.

Journal article

Age, ethnicity and equalities: synthesising policy and practice messages from two recent studies of elder abuse in the UK

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, BOWES Alison
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Society, 9(2), April 2010, pp.255-265.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This paper, drawing on comparative discussion of two recent studies of elder abuse in the United Kingdom, outlines the how these studies fit into current policy contexts on adult safeguarding. Elder abuse among people from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups is a complex issues with five key components: cross-cultural divides; professional’s lack of skill with ethnic diversity; family structures dictate that explanations of abuse vary; BME groups may experience additional exclusion through racism, compounding the effects of ageism; and finally the effects of migration, language and culture may impact abuse. Interviews were carried out with 2,111 individuals, aged 66 or older, in the UK between March and September 2006, and discussed specific experiences of abuse and maltreatment. The authors’ discussion draws out the central messages and identifies the challenges that the studies present to recent policy debates and innovations. These relate to the need to properly integrate both wider older people's issues and issues of racism and ethnicity within developments in adult safeguarding policy as well as social care services as the personalisation agenda advances.

Journal article

Research on the costs of long-term care for older people – current and emerging issues

Author:
BOWES Alison
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Society, 6(3), July 2007, pp.447-459.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This review explores debates concerning the costs of long-term care for older people, and aims to give an overview of the recent and current research agenda in this area, referring primarily to work published 2000–2006. The focus of much work is on the identification of costs, their distribution and the contexts of policy and delivery of services in which these operate.

Book Full text available online for free

Support for majority and minority ethnic groups at home - older people's perspectives

Authors:
BOWES Alison, MACDONALD Charlotte
Publisher:
Scottish Executive Central Research Unit. 2000 8p
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
pp
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This study compares needs and service provision from the perspectives of older people drawn from majority and minority ethnic populations in Glasgow and Edinburgh. The minority ethnic group were people of South Asian origin. The results of two studies provide insight into differences and similarities in relation to knowledge about services, access to services, experience of health care, and informal networks of support.

Book Full text available online for free

Good practice in the design of homes and living spaces for people living with dementia and sight loss

Authors:
BOWES Alison, et al
Publisher:
Thomas Pocklington Trust
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This document summarises research findings on the design of homes and living spaces for people living with dementia and sight loss and provides advice on some of the challenges when optimising home environments. The research included systematic review of the literature; focus groups and interviews with 19 people living with dementia and sight loss and 10 care staff; and interviews with key professional stakeholders. The review found that research on design for people with sight loss nearly always emphasises promoting independence and choice. While the literature on design for people with dementia is also concerned with assisting people to manage their home environment, it often includes a focus on control of behaviours, activities and locations. The findings provide evidence-based guidance, information and recommendations about design for people with sight loss and dementia concerning: use of colour and contrast; lighting; fixtures and fittings; layout and design of kitchens; good bathroom design; entrances and exits; gardens and outdoor areas. The document also provides information on how the findings have also been used to draw up practice guidance on designing homes and living spaces for people with dementia and sight loss. (Edited publisher abstract)

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