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Book Full text available online for free

Supported housing for older people in the UK: an evidence review: summary

Authors:
PANNELL Jenny, BLOOD Imogen
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Sheltered housing has changed significantly over the past decade, yet has received little attention from researchers and policy-makers. Changes to funding and benefits for older people's housing and support services need underpinning by robust evidence. This study examines existing evidence about the quality of life offered by sheltered and retirement housing and identifies factors that may improve or reduce quality of life. Eighty publications with material on housing with support and further background publications were included, along with a detailed analysis of 24 academic and resident-led research reports. Key points suggest that: there is limited recent research evidence on the quality of accommodation, services and residents in the UK's 550,000 units of housing with support for older people; this lack of evidence is a cause for concern for residents, providers and commissioners of housing, support and care; and diminishing levels of on-site staffing have affected quality of life for some residents.

Book Full text available online for free

Supported housing for older people in the UK: evidence review: report

Authors:
PANNELL Jenny, BLOOD Imogen
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
68p.
Place of publication:
York

Sheltered housing has changed significantly over the past decade, yet has received little attention from researchers and policy-makers. Changes to funding and benefits for older people's housing and support services need underpinning by robust evidence. This study examines existing evidence about the quality of life offered by sheltered and retirement housing and identifies factors that may improve or reduce quality of life. Eighty publications with material on housing with support and further background publications were included, along with a detailed analysis of 24 academic and resident-led research reports. Key points suggest that: there is limited recent research evidence on the quality of accommodation, services and residents in the UK's 550,000 units of housing with support for older people; this lack of evidence is a cause for concern for residents, providers and commissioners of housing, support and care; and diminishing levels of on-site staffing have affected quality of life for some residents.

Book Full text available online for free

Findings from housing with care research: practice examples

Authors:
BLOOD Imogen, PANELL Jenny, COPEMAN Ian
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
28p.
Place of publication:
York

This report draws together practical examples of ways of working from two reports: “Boundaries of roles and responsibilities in housing with care” and “Affordability, choices and quality of life in housing with care”. It highlights ways of working in different housing with care schemes, drawing on the two studies and considering their implications in very practical terms. The practice guide is aimed at people managing frontline housing with care schemes, commissioners and senior managers in housing organisations, social services and health, and frontline staff, older people and their relatives. The practice guide: identifies five key topics in housing with care which could benefit from improvement; summarises what older people and their relatives say they value in housing with care; and presents practical examples.

Journal article

Integrating housing with care for older people

Author:
BLOOD Imogen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 21(4), 2013, pp.178-187.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose – The research explored the way in which different services, providers and other key players work together in housing with care (HWC) schemes and the impact of this on the quality of life of the older people living in them, especially those with high support needs. Methods – This qualitative study included interviews with 47 residents and five relatives at 19 private and not-for-profit schemes across the UK and 52 professionals from provider, statutory and other relevant organisations. Findings – Most participants were very satisfied with the services in HWC but a third described problems linked to “boundary” issues, where gaps, delays or confusion had arisen at the interface between teams, organisations or professional groups. Gaps often occurred where tasks were relatively small: they affected the quality of life of older people with high support needs but did not necessarily outweigh the benefits of living in HWC. Practical implications – We identify ways of improving integrated working in HWC and beyond. The paper is relevant to those commissioning and providing services to older people and to all those with an interest in integrating care and housing. Originality/value – This is the first UK-wide, cross-sector study to focus specifically on the boundaries between roles and responsibilities and their impact on residents in HWC. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Whose responsibility? Boundaries of roles and responsibilities in housing with care: report

Authors:
BLOOD Imogen, PANNELL Jenny, COPEMAN Ian
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
56p.
Place of publication:
London

Housing with care (HWC) aims to bring the provision of housing support and care together under one roof and this can bring many benefits to older people with high support needs. However, schemes operate in a complex funding and regulatory environment. There is no single model of HWC, and in some schemes, providers are delivering different services alongside each other. This is the first UK-wide study to explore the impact of this complexity on residents’ quality of life. It explored the boundaries of roles and responsibilities in HWC and how they impact on older residents' quality of life, particularly those with high support needs. Most residents reported very positive experiences of HWC, but a third described problems linked to roles and responsibilities, from building maintenance to increasing care needs. Ambiguity around the boundaries between job roles can lead to confusion, gaps or duplication. Also, gaps were often filled by staff members over-stretching their roles, but such a discretionary approach can be inconsistent, inequitable and unsustainable.

Book Full text available online for free

Whose responsibility? Boundaries of roles and responsibilities in housing with care: summary

Authors:
BLOOD Imogen, PANELL Jenny, COPEMAN Ian
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Housing with care (HWC) aims to bring the provision of housing support and care together under one roof and this can bring many benefits to older people with high support needs. However, schemes operate in a complex funding and regulatory environment. There is no single model of HWC, and in some schemes, providers are delivering different services alongside each other. This brief summary describes the first UK-wide study to examine the impact of this complexity on residents’ quality of life. It explored the boundaries of roles and responsibilities in HWC and how they impact on older residents' quality of life, particularly those with high support needs. Most residents reported very positive experiences of HWC, but a third described problems linked to roles and responsibilities, from building maintenance to increasing care needs. Ambiguity around the boundaries between job roles can lead to confusion, gaps or duplication. Also, gaps were often filled by staff members over-stretching their roles, but such a discretionary approach can be inconsistent, inequitable and unsustainable.

Book Full text available online for free

A better life: valuing our later years

Author:
BLOOD Imogen
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
91
Place of publication:
York

In 2009, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation launched the five-year programme A Better Life, to explore what can help older people with high support needs to improve their quality of life (and what ‘quality of life’ means for them) now and in the future. This book was commissioned by JRF to draw out and reflect on the key messages from this body of work. A recurring theme in the programme is that ageing is about all of us; it is everyone’s business, not just those working in care homes, commissioning health and care services, or developing government policies and programmes. The book quotes the personal experiences of individual older people, and asks why it is that personal identity risks getting overlooked at this stage of life. It looks specifically at how they can contribute to the development of the supportive relationships, which older people with high support needs value. It considers the messages about what ‘choice’, ‘control’ and ‘independence’ mean to people as they get older. A concluding chapter summarises key messages and draws together the practical ideas for change that were introduce throughout the report, starting with old age is not about ‘them’: it is about all of us. Older people are individuals, and as a group, they are becoming more diverse. Relationships matter to us whatever our age: we have a fundamental human need to connect with others meaningfully. Older people with high support needs have many assets, strengths and resources; and whatever our age or support needs, we should all be treated as citizens: the individual and collective voices of older people with high support needs should be heard and given power. A short paper is also available that summarises the key messages from JRF’s ‘A better life’ programme of work. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Affordability, choices and quality of life in housing with care: report

Authors:
PANNELL Jenny, BLOOD Imogen, COPEMAN Ian
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
63p.
Place of publication:
York

Research on affordability of housing with care has so far focused on costs and savings to local authority budgets. There has been little research on affordability for residents, especially self-funders. Proposed changes to benefits will potentially impact on all residents, especially on people under state pension age. This report presents findings from the first study of tenants and leaseholders who are paying some or all their own costs in private and not-for-profit housing with care (HWC). It examined how affordability affects choice, and the consequences for quality of life - particularly for those with high or increasing support needs. The 18-month UK-wide study involved 21 schemes (for rent and sale), developed and managed by private and not-for-profit providers. Interviews were held with 78 residents (54 tenants and 24 leaseholders), 4 family carers and 47 professionals.  This research found that: older people face many uncertainties about affordability, changes to charges and care needs; 85% of residents interviewed were very happy in HWC. Couples could stay together, and partner carers received support; the majority of people saw HWC as good value for money; and age and health influenced whether HWC was (and would remain) affordable.

Book Full text available online for free

Affordability, choices and quality of life in housing with care: summary

Authors:
PANNELL Jenny, BLOOD Imogen, COPEMAN Ian
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Research on affordability of housing with care has so far focused on costs and savings to local authority budgets. There has been little research on affordability for residents, especially self-funders. Proposed changes to benefits will potentially impact on all residents, especially on people under state pension age. This report presents findings from the first study of tenants and leaseholders who are paying some or all their own costs in private and not-for-profit housing with care (HWC). It examined how affordability affects choice, and the consequences for quality of life - particularly for those with high or increasing support needs. The 18-month UK-wide study involved 21 schemes (for rent and sale), developed and managed by private and not-for-profit providers. Interviews were held with 78 residents (54 tenants and 24 leaseholders), 4 family carers and 47 professionals.  This research found that: older people face many uncertainties about affordability, changes to charges and care needs; 85% of residents interviewed were very happy in HWC. Couples could stay together, and partner carers received support; the majority of people saw HWC as good value for money; and age and health influenced whether HWC was (and would remain) affordable.

Book Full text available online for free

Boundaries of roles and responsibilities in housing with care schemes

Authors:
PANNELL Jenny, BLOOD Imogen
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
20p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

This article considers the boundaries, roles and responsibilities of housing with care (HWC) services. Different organisations provide a range of services while external agencies guide, regulate and inspect what they do. Since there is no single model of HWC, individual dwellings and schemes vary enormously in size and scale, location, services and cost. They are run by private companies and not-for-profit housing associations and charities; and there are significant variations in provision and policy context across the UK. The article highlights contested roles and responsibilities in HWC concerning issues around: decisions to move in and allocations; the different expectations residents, families, providers and professionals have of HWC; buildings and facilities provision, management and maintenance, health and safety; promoting well-being and preventing exclusion of frailer residents; safeguarding and duty of care; managing increasing care and support needs; whether HWC offers a ‘home for life’.

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