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Journal article

Mistreatment of older people in the United Kingdom: findings from the first National Prevalence Study

Authors:
BIGGS Simon, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 20(1), January 2009, pp.1-14.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The National Prevalence Study of Elder Mistreatment took place in 2006 and included 2,111 respondents aged 66 and over from England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland who answered a face-to-face questionnaire. Mistreatment by family members, close friends or care workers was reported by 2.6%, with the most common form being neglect (1.1%) followed by financial abuse (0.6%), psychological abuse (0.4%), physical abuse (0.4%) and sexual abuse (0.2%). Women were significantly more likely to have experienced mistreatment than men but there were gender differences according to type of abuse and perpetrator, and divergent patterns for neglect, financial and interpersonal abuse. Further analysis of the data also indicated that the likelihood of mistreatment varied according to socioeconomic position and health status.

Journal article

Baby boomers and adult ageing: issues for social and public policy

Authors:
BIGGS Simon, et al
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing, 8(3), September 2007, pp.32-40.
Publisher:
Pier Professional
Place of publication:
Brighton

This article provides a critical assessment of academic and policy approaches to population ageing with an emphasis on the baby boomer cohort and constructions of late-life identity. It is suggested that policy towards an ageing population has shifted in focus, away from particular social hazards and towards an attempt to re-engineer the meaning of legitimate ageing and social participation in later life. Three themes are identified: constructing the baby boomers as a force for social change, a downward drift of the age associated with 'older people' and a shift away from defining ageing identifies through consumption, back towards work and production. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications for future social and public policy.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Elder abuse in Europe

Authors:
BIGGS Simon, KINGSTON Paul
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Europe, 2(3), 1995, pp.1-2.
Publisher:
Russell House

Elder abuse is becoming a matter of increasing concern in Europe. The authors introduce this special edition on the subject.

Journal article

Getting in training

Author:
BIGGS Simon
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 15.7.93, 1993, p.15.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

To tackle elder abuse effectively it is vital that social workers are trained. Looks at the types of training approaches available and calls for long-term strategies to be drawn up.

Book

Confronting ageing: a groupwork manual for helping professionals

Author:
BIGGS Simon
Publisher:
Central Council for Education and Training in Social Work
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
88p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Manual for staff working with older people with exercises to explore attitudes and activities relevant to their working lives. Aims both to deepen understanding and promote reassessment of existing practices.

Book

Older people: a resource list for social work trainers

Authors:
BIGGS Simon, HEWERDINE Celia, comps
Publisher:
Central Council for Education and Training in Social Work
Publication year:
1988
Pagination:
96p., bibliogs..
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Spiritual perspectives of Black Caribbean and White British older adults: development of a spiritual typology in later life

Authors:
SADLER Euan, BIGGS Simon, GLASER Karen
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 33(3), 2013, pp.511-538.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Spirituality is positively linked to health and well-being in later life, particularly among older adults of black ethnic groups. However, definitions of spirituality in the literature have largely been theoretically informed, rather than based on the views of older people themselves. Using in-depth interviews with 34 individuals aged between 60 and 95 years in South London, this study examines the spiritual perspectives of Black Caribbean and White British older adults. The research aimed to develop a spiritual typology to add to an understanding of the process of spirituality in later life. Findings showed that Black Caribbean older individuals mostly defined spirituality in relation to their belief in a transcendent God, whereas White British older individuals tended to draw upon a wider range of spiritual, religious or secular notions. A spirituality typology in later life captured four categories of relationship, between ‘God to self’, ‘self to God’, ‘self to universe’ and ‘self to life’. The typology highlights the central role of ethnicity in shaping spiritual perspectives in later life, and identifies the multidimensional nature of spirituality among older adults, reflecting in part a developmental process, although a process which is socially and culturally constructed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Exploring generational intelligence as a model for examining the process of intergenerational relationships

Authors:
BIGGS Simon, HAAPALA Irja, LOWENSTEIN Ariela
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 31(7), October 2011, pp.1107-1124.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article discusses an emerging model of intergenerational relationships that places oneself in the position of a person of a different age. It examines an experiential approach that draws on sociological thinking on generational consciousness and on the relationships between conflict, solidarity and ambivalence. The main emphasis is on the processes of generational experience, and a distinction is made between the informational knowledge that is available to social actors and the degree to which it is possible to act intelligently. The latter highlights the steps that would need to be taken to become critically aware of age as a factor in social relations, including the relative ability to recognise one's personal generational distinctiveness, acquiring understanding of the relationship between generations, critical awareness of the value stance being taken toward generational positions, and finally, acting in a manner that is generationally aware. The article concludes with a discussion of how generational relations can be encouraged. Implications for future research into intergenerational relationships is presented.

Journal article

The age-shift: observations on social policy, ageism and the dynamics of the adult lifecourse

Authors:
BIGGS Simon, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community, 20(3), November 2006, pp.239-250.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Through a critical engagement with policy trends, the authors ask how shifts in ideologies of ageing might influence the possibilities available to adults as they grow older. Of particular interest are the implications for how people are being encouraged to think about the adult lifecourse. These questions are addressed by looking at policy development, taking the 2000–2005 period in the UK as a case example, and by comparing this period to wider regional and international trends. Finally, the implications of contemporary policy are assessed, from a psychodynamic point of view, for the maintenance of a viable identity in later life and for intergenerational relationships.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The development of an elder abuse policy in Britain: patterns and prospects

Author:
BIGGS Simon
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Europe, 2(3), 1995, pp.30-33.
Publisher:
Russell House

The abuse of older people had been identified as a social problem at approximately the same time in both the UK and the USA. However, British responses to the problem have been slow to take shape. This article examines how British social policy currently views elder abuse and its implications for its positioning as a social problem of the 1990s.

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