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Journal article

Alcohol use in later life - older people's perspectives

Authors:
WARD Lizzie, BARNES Marian, GAHAGAN Beatrice
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 12(4), 2011, pp.239-247.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper reports on qualitative research aiming to generate a wider evidence-based by exploring the circumstances in which older people drink, and the meaning that drinking alcohol has for them and its impact. The study developed a participatory methodology in which older people were actively involved in designing and carrying out the research. 21 older people were recruited for interviews, which were carried out by older co-researchers. The article describes the study and its findings. Thematic analysis identified drinking styles (social - regular; social - occasional; heavy lone drinking; and heavy drinking in a drinking network) and themes illustrating what affects drinking styles (social relationships; loss, change and adaptation; cost and availability; health, well-being and growing older; and responsibility, control and independence). The article discusses aspects of older people's drinking habits, including seeking help. It notes that this is a sensitive topic, discusses implications for practice and policy development, and suggests that more research is needed to understand the social, cultural and economic contexts of older people's drinking behaviour.

Journal article

New jobs old roles: working for prevention in a whole-system model of health and social care for older people

Authors:
SMITH Naomi, BARNES Marian
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 21(1), 2013, pp.79-87.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The ‘Partnerships for Older People Projects’ programme provided government funding for local and health authorities to pilot prevention and intervention services in partnership with the voluntary sector and older people between 2006 and 2009. This evaluation of a pilot in southern England used a Theory of Change approach to gather and reflect on data with different groups involved in the delivery of this model of prevention. This whole-system model, although complex and challenging to implement, was considered overall to have been a success and provided significant learning for partners and stakeholders on the challenges and benefits of working across professional and sectoral boundaries. New posts were created as part of the model – two of these, recruited to and managed by voluntary sector partners, were identified as ‘new jobs’, but echoed ‘old roles’ within community and voluntary sector based health and social care. The authors reflect on the parallels of these roles with previously existing roles and ways of working and reflect on how the whole-system approach of this particular pilot enabled these new jobs to develop in appropriate and successful ways.

Journal article

Ageing activists: who gets involved in older people's forums?

Authors:
BARNES Marian, HARRISON Elizabeth, MURRAY Lesley
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 32(2), February 2012, pp.261-280.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Senior Citizens’ Forums have been established across East Sussex to provide a mechanism for dialogue between the County Council, the Primary Care Trusts, other public agencies, and older people. The aim of this article is to explore the characteristics and motivations of the members of these forums, specifically looking at: how they see themselves in relation to ‘other older people’; and their relationships with the places in which they live. The article draws upon pieces of research conducted with 2 forums. The first involved participatory research with forum members to explore issues prompting their participation and their experiences of this. The second comprised biographical interviews with forum members with reference to mobility and participation over their lifespan. The findings are discussed in relation to the characterisation of participants in such forums as the ‘usual suspects’ whose legitimacy to speak on behalf of others may be questioned, and by reference to a growing recognition of the significance of place in the lives of older people. Important differences in motivations, backgrounds and priorities of forum members are shown between the 2 forums. The research confirms that place-based participation tends to engage those who are fitter and who have more social and cultural capital, but questions assumptions that this means they are spaces for the pursuit of self-interest.

Book Full text available online for free

Cheers!?: a project about older people and alcohol

Authors:
WARD Lizzie, BARNES Marian, GAHAGAN Beatrice
Publisher:
University of Brighton. Health and Social Policy Research Centre
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
82p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Brighton

This was a partnership project led by Age Concern Brighton, Hove & Portslade and included Brighton & Hove City Council, Brighton & Hove Primary Care Trust, the Drug and Alcohol Action Team and the University of Brighton. Aware that there was a gap in local research evidence on alcohol use by older people in the city, the agencies commissioned a scoping study which mapped current practitioner knowledge in a discrete area of the city. Following on from this, further research was undertaken which examined the issues from older people's perspectives. The research explored the circumstances in which older people drink, the meaning that drinking alcohol has for them and the impact it has, acknowledging that this can be a pleasurable and positive experience, as well as something that can have adverse health, financial, personal and interpersonal impacts. The project used a participative approach and involved older people in designing and carrying out the research as co-researchers and as members of an older people's reference group. Working as a team we were able to draw on our different knowledge, experience and expertise to create contexts in which older people could talk about their experiences of drinking in ways that made sense to them and to construct their own ideas about the place of alcohol in their lives.

Book

Paths to empowerment

Editors:
BARNES Marian, WARREN Lorna
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
148p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

In two sections. Section one looks at definitions of empowerment, and existing models and practice. Section two discusses issues for research and researchers. Includes illustrations of different, and sometimes conflicting, voices to emerge from within the user movement and from among voluntary and statutory sector allies.

Journal article

Transforming practice with older people through an ethic of care

Authors:
WARD Lizzie, BARNES Marian
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 46(4), 2016, pp.906-922.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This article explores the relevance of deliberative practices framed by feminist care ethics to social work practice with older people. It draws on two connected projects which brought together older people: practitioners and academics. The first was a participatory research project in which the significance of care to well-being in old age emerged. The second was a knowledge exchange project which generated learning resources for social care practice based on the research findings of the first project. The authors analyse selected transcripts of recordings from meetings of both projects to consider the ways that discussions about lived experiences and everyday lives demonstrate care through this dialogue. Using this analysis, the authors propose that care ethics can be useful in transforming relationships between older people and those working with them through the creation of hybrid spaces in which ‘care-full deliberation’ can happen. It is argued that such reflective spaces can enable transformative dialogue about care and its importance to older people and offer a counterbalance to the procedurally driven environments in which much social work practice takes place and can support practice more attuned to the circumstances and concerns of older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Older people, well-being and participation: learning resources based on collaborative research

Authors:
BARNES Marian, GAHAGAN Beatrice, WARD Lizzie
Publishers:
University of Brighton, Age UK Brighton & Hove
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
24
Place of publication:
Brighton

The handbook accompanies films made as part of an ESRC funded participatory research project on well-being in older age. The research was carried out by a team of older people, university researchers and a voluntary sector manager. The handbook provides detailed explanations of the issues explored through the acted scenarios. It also lists questions that can used to reflect more on these issues, and suggests where you can go for more information. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Being well enough in old age

Authors:
BARNES Marian, TAYLOR David, WARD Lizzie
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 33(3), 2013, pp.473-493.
Publisher:
Sage

This article offers a critique of the dominant ways in which well-being has been conceptualized and researched within social policy, focusing in particular on the significance of this for policy relating to older people. It conceptualizes well-being as relational and generative rather than an individual outcome. Normative notions of independence, autonomy and consumerism at the heart of policy on well-being and ageing are critically explored and it is suggested that indexes of older people’s happiness conceal more than they reveal. This theoretical approach is illustrated with empirical material from a participatory study in which older people were co-producers of knowledge about what well-being means and how it can be produced. Working with older people as co-researchers it was found that keeping well in old age involves demanding emotional and organizational labour both for older people and for family and friends. The need for ethical and relational sensibilities at the heart of policy on well-being and ageing is suggested. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

An ethic of care and sibling care in older age

Author:
BARNES Marian
Journal article citation:
Families, Relationships and Societies, 1(1), 2012, pp.7-23.
Publisher:
Policy Press
Place of publication:
Bristol

Current feminist care ethics emphasises the relational nature of care which suggests the importance of understanding the different dynamics of care in different relational contexts. This article applies such a perspective to a small number of interviews with carers looking after siblings in older age. While some attention has been given to sibling care following the death of parents of people with learning difficulties and, to a lesser extent, those with enduring mental health problems, older sibling care can take place when siblings become ill, or when they have had close contact over a lifetime. Personal descriptions suggested that motivations to care are strongly embedded in family responsibility, but the precise meaning and consequences of this vary. Such relationships may not be more egalitarian than other familial caring relationships, although it was noted that caregiving brought older siblings closer together.

Book Full text available online for free

Well-being in old age: findings from participatory research

Authors:
WARD Lizzie, BARNES Marian, GAHAGAN Beatrice
Publisher:
University of Brighton; Age Concern Brighton, Hove and Portslade
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
88p.
Place of publication:
Brighton

This project was designed to develop understanding of what well-being means to older people, and of how it is produced. A major aim of the project was to make a contribution to thinking about policy and practice and how this might enhance or detract from the way people experience well-being in old age. Eleven co-researchers, aged between 60 and 87, were recruited between 2008 and 2011. The co-researchers carried out one to one interviews with 30 older people and seven focus groups in which another 59 older people took part. Findings revealed that relationships were significant. Families could be a source of support and security, but for some can also involve difficult and painful relationships, distance and estrangement. Good relationships with adult children can contribute to well-being and maintaining satisfactory relationships was recognised as important. Health also featured as an important factor in well-being; chronic ill health had not only physical effects, but also emotional and psychological impacts. However, Being able to draw on experiences gained over a lifetime, learning from past mistakes, or reflecting on the benefit of hindsight, informed present attitudes and was a personal resource for some.

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