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Book

A review of research on falls among elderly people

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Trade and Industry,|Age Concern
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
86p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Health and care services for older people: overview report on research to support the national service framework for older people

Author:
ASKHAM Janet
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
84p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report summarises the key findings from a group of 16 studies commissioned by the Policy Research Programme under the ‘Older People’s use of services’ Research Initiative. The aim of the initiative was to inform and assess the implementation of the National Service Framework for Older People (2001)

Journal article

Making sense of dementia: carers' perceptions

Author:
ASKHAM Janet
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 15(1), March 1995, pp.103-114.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Outlines how the informal care givers of people recently diagnosed as suffering from dementia perceive and describe the condition. Examines the reasons for the wide variety of understanding of dementia.

Book

Breaking the silence: HIV/AIDS and older people; towards greater awareness of their support needs

Authors:
STEWART Elaine, ASKHAM Janet
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
10p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Short paper focusing on the support needs of older people (aged over 50) with HIV/AIDS.

Book

Caring: the importance of third age carers

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, et al
Publisher:
Carnegie United Kingdom Trust
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
100p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Dunfermline

Research study that set out to look at: the proportion of third age carers providing informal care; possible future trends; areas of concern; the financial costs; and future prospects. Also considers how policies might be modified to alleviate problems experienced by carers and to create better opportunities for them.

Journal article

Care at home for people with dementia: as in a total institution?

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 27(1), January 2007, pp.3-24.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article examines three kinds of social relationship likely to be present when people with dementia are cared for at home by relatives or friends: custodial care, an intimate relationship, and home-life. Using Goffman's three defining aspects of custodial care – routinisation, surveillance and mortification of the self – the paper examines whether these characterised the care of people with dementia at home and, if so, whether they conflicted with the intimate relationship and with home-life. The study involved sustained observations and interviews with 20 people with dementia and their carers in and around London, and qualitative analysis of the data. It was found that all three aspects of custodial care were present although not fully realised, and that they led to difficulties, many of which were associated with the concurrent pursuit of an intimate relationship and home-life. In all cases, daily life was routinised partly to help accomplish care tasks but was found monotonous, while surveillance was usual but restrictive, and prevented both the carers and those with dementia from doing things that they wished to do. Those with dementia were distressed by the denial of their former identities, such as car-driver or home-maker, and by being treated like children. Both the carers and the people with dementia had various ways of balancing custodial care, their intimate relationships and home-life, such as combining routines with other activities, evading surveillance or carrying it out by indirect means, and there were many attempts to maintain some semblance of former identities.

Book

To have and to hold: the bond between older people and the homes they own

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, et al
Publisher:
York Publishing Service/Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
62p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

Presents the findings of a detailed interview study looking at the attitudes of older home owners to their property. Finds that the interviewees see the independence and financial aspects of home ownership as both beneficial and burdensome. Individual circumstances, such as divorce, disability or widowhood influenced their views about moving home and about residential care.

Book

Opinions on pensions: older people's attitudes to incomes, taxes and benefits

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, HANCOCK Ruth, HILLS Julie
Publisher:
Age Concern Institute of Gerontology
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
38p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Research study based on the views and attitudes of older people towards financial matters as they affect them.

Book

Social and health authority services for elderly people from black and minority ethnic communities

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, HENSHAW Lesley, TARPEY Maryrose
Publisher:
HMSO/Age Concern Institute of Gerontology
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
142p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Research study looking at local initiatives in service provision for black and minority ethnic elders. Includes the views of staff and users.

Book

Dementia and home care: a research report on a home support scheme for dementia sufferers

Authors:
ASKHAM Janet, THOMPSON Catherine
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
174p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Mitcham

Outlines project design and method; assesses benefits to clients and effects on carers. Looks at the cost of home care and its limitations.

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