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Book

Each day is different: an introduction to the care and support of people with dementia

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
2nd ed.

This booklet is a beginner's guide to working with people with dementia. It is designed to help staff in the first few weeks in their role and will also be useful for those who have been working with people with dementia for a while. The booklet provides practical tips on how staff should approach working with people with dementia and also suggests simple ways to boost confidence to make a real difference to the lives of people with dementia. Contents include chapters on: each day is different; The first days in the job; What is dementia; You can make a difference; It’s good to talk; dignity; understanding how dementia affects behaviour; enjoy your work; and further information.

Book

An introduction to vascular dementia

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
28p.
Place of publication:
London

Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Dementia is used to describe the symptoms that occur when the brain is damaged by specific diseases. These diseases include Alzheimer's disease and Vascular dementia. Someone with dementia may have difficulties remembering, solving problems or concentrating. Vascular dementia is a type of dementia caused by problems in the supply of blood to the brain. This information booklet is designed to help anyone who works with and supports people with Vascular dementia to understand the condition. It explains the causes, symptoms and treatments available. Contents include chapters on: what is dementia; what is vascular dementia and; diagnosing vascular dementia; factors that may cause vascular dementia; treatment; support; guidance for health professionals; and useful organisations

Book Full text available online for free

Guidelines for care: person-centred care of people with dementia living in care homes: framework

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer Society of Canada
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
67p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Toronto

These guidelines for care present a framework aimed at improving the quality of care of people with dementia in care homes through a person-centred philosophy. The Alzheimer Society suggests that people with dementia have the right to enjoy the highest possible quality of life and quality of care by being engaged in meaningful relationships which are based on equality, understanding, sharing, participation, collaboration, dignity, trust and respect. The framework is an evidence based foundation for the development of knowledge translation tools to enhance quality care. A Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) was completed to systematically examine practice guidelines published in peer-reviewed journals regarding the care of people in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease living in care homes. The guidelines consist of the following sections: what does a person-centred philosophy mean; what does person-centred care look like in a care home; ensuring family inclusiveness; extending a person-centred philosophy through end of life.

Book Full text available online for free

Putting care right: your guide to choosing a care home

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
London

This guide features the essential issues to consider when deciding on a care home for a person with dementia. It lists questions families can put to care home staff and includes blank pages for notes on the places they visit. This guide raises the crucial questions everyone should ask about care homes. It will also help people to understand how to recognise quality care and help them to start demanding the high standards of care that people with dementia deserve. The charity’s survey found a third of people over 55 have experience of looking for care homes, but nationwide more than more than four out of ten people admit they would not know what to look for in a good care home. Skilled staff appear to be more important than a nicely decorated room when it comes to deciding on the quality of residential care. A choice of activities and access to outside space was also rated as important by more than 94 per cent of people.

Book

Understanding vascular dementia

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
London

This booklet has been written to help anyone affected by vascular dementia – people with dementia, carers, family members and professionals – to understand the condition. It is a type of dementia caused by problems with the supply of blood to, or within the brain. The stages are similar to those of Alzheimer's disease, but the decline of functions happens in steps, rather than gradually. Symptoms vary, depending on which parts of the brain have been damaged and how severe the damage is. Researchers believe that people who have had a stroke have an increased risk of developing vascular dementia. In the early stages, the individual may not experience memory problems and the personality will be unaffected. Subcategories of vascular dementia include (1) mild vascular cognitive impairment, (2) multi-infarct dementia, (3) vascular dementia due to a strategic single infarct, (5) vascular dementia due to hemorrhagic lesions, (6) Binswanger’s disease and (7) mixed dementia (combination of AD and vascular dementia.

Book Full text available online for free

Dementia in rural Wales

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
London

This report looks at current situation for people living with dementia in rural areas in Wales and identifies the additional challenges facing people with dementia and their carers. Based on an analysis of existing data, the report estimates that approximately 17,000 people living with dementia in Wales live in rural areas. It also suggests that there will be a disproportionately large increase in the number of people with dementia in rural areas in the future due the large proportion of older people in the population, a greater proportion of the population living in rural areas than both Scotland and England; and a greater growth of the older population rural areas than in urban ones. Interviews carried out with people affected by dementia in rural areas identified some of the challenges of living in rural areas, which included poor transport links which make it harder to access help, support services less likely to be commissioned in rural areas, lack of awareness of dementia, and carers more likely to feel isolated and unsupported. The report sets out a series of recommendations in order to find out more about the extent, impact and potential growth of dementia in rural areas, and to see how Wales can lead the way in supporting people affected by it. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Living and dying with dementia in England: barriers to care

Authors:
MARIE CURIE CANCER CARE, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publishers:
Marie Curie Cancer Care, Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
24
Place of publication:
London

This report assesses access to appropriate high quality care in the final stage of dementia – a progressive, terminal illness. It highlights that dementia is often not recognised as a terminal diagnosis, and this can lead to poor access to care, inconsistent quality of care and inadequate pain management. The report draws on research from across the UK and particularly from University College London, as well as findings from health and social care services. The paper examines the three main barriers that prevent many people from accessing appropriate high-quality care at the end of their lives. These are: poor identification and planning, including poor recognition of dementia as a terminal illness and a cause of death and lack of appropriate/timely diagnosis and care planning; inequality of access to palliative care, hospice care and funding and discrimination; and inconsistency in care standards and inappropriate hospital admissions. The report aims to bring together NHS organisations, social care bodies, royal colleges, charities, researchers, and people with experience of dementia and end of life care, to explore how to address the barriers and develop an action plan that each organisation can to sign up to. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Optimising treatment and care for people with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia: a best practice guide for health and social care professionals

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
26p.
Place of publication:
London

More than 90% of people with dementia will experience behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) as part of their illness. These symptoms include agitation, aggression, hallucinations and delusions. This guide has been designed to support health and social care professionals to determine the best treatment and care for people experiencing BPSD. It has been designed to be a practical, informative tool, with an emphasis on alternatives to drug treatment. Good practice recommendations, such as the NICE dementia guidelines, recommend psychosocial interventions as the first line approach and emphasise the importance of assessing medical conditions and pain, which often underpin the development of these symptoms. The value of not rushing into treatment is also important, as many people with BPSD will experience significant improvement or resolution of symptoms over a 4-6 week period. The toolkit provides 2 simple flow diagrams to be used depending on whether the person with dementia is already prescribed antipsychotics or not. The flow diagrams should be used to determine the best care and treatment for each person with dementia. The guidance, charts and care plans are colour-coded according to a traffic light system representing: prevention; watchful waiting; and specific interventions and antipsychotic prescription.

Book Full text available online for free

Home from home: quality of care for people with dementia living in care homes

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
69p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The Alzheimer's Society's Home From Home report calls for care homes to begin operating as specialist dementia care providers. Research shows a typical person with dementia in a care home spends just two minutes in every six hours socially interacting with other people - most of these residents are in the advanced stages of dementia and rely on the support of trained staff. The Home From Home report features a survey of more than 3,500 people, including relatives of people with dementia, care home staff and managers. The survey shows more than half of people with a relative in residential care say there is not enough for the person with dementia to do each day. Over one in four family carers feel they do not receive enough information about the care and treatment of the person they care for. Care home staff say providing care that improves the quality of life of residents with dementia is the top factor in job satisfaction.

Book Full text available online for free

Dementia-friendly technology: a charter that helps every person with dementia benefit from technology that meets their needs

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
30
Place of publication:
London

The Dementia-friendly technology charter aims to give people with dementia and their carers information on how to access technology and provides guidance to health, housing and social care professionals on how to make technology work for people based on their individual needs. The charter, developed by a diverse working group led by Tunstall Healthcare, has been produced as part of the Dementia Friendly Communities programme. The charter sets out in detail what considerations community and primary care providers need to give to technology and what they need to have in place during the different stages of a person with dementia’s journey, including before diagnosis, after diagnosis, during a crisis and when more complex needs appear. It also illustrates the key components of a good technology service and includes a self-evaluation check list for commissioners and providers. (Edited publisher abstract)

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