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Journal article

Don't ask me, I'm only the client

Author:
HOCKING Josephine
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 20.2.92, 1992, p.13.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Looks at the failure of the Children Act to prevent children being sent to adult psychiatric wards.

Book

Bridges over troubled waters: a report from the NHS Health Advisory Service on services for disturbed adolescents

Author:
NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE. HEALTH ADVISORY SERVICE
Publisher:
National Health Service. Health Advisory Service
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
77p.,appendices.
Place of publication:
Sutton
Book Full text available online for free

The truth about self-harm for young people and their friends and families

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
35
Place of publication:
London

This booklet provides accessible information and advice on self-harm. Self-harm describes any behaviour where someone causes harm to themselves, usually as a way to help cope with difficult or distressing thoughts and feelings. It most frequently takes the form of cutting, burning or nonlethal overdoses. However, it can also be any behaviour that causes injury – no matter how minor, or high-risk behaviours. This resource explains how to get help, the recovery process, how to keep safe, and what to do, and look out for, if worried that someone may be self-harming. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

No harm done: recognising and responding to self-harm. Next steps for staff working with young people

Authors:
YOUNGMINDS, ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS, CHARLIE WALLER MEMORIAL TRUST
Publisher:
YoungMinds
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Provides simple guidance to help professionals support young people who are self-harming. Self-harm describes any way in which a young person might harm themselves or put themselves at risk in order to cope with difficult thoughts, feelings or experiences. It affects up to 1 in 5 young people and spans the divides of gender, class, age and ethnicity. The document examines: how to recognise the self-harm warning signs; how to hold the first conversation; what to do when a young person is not ready to talk; what to do when there are concerns about a young person's immediate safety; how to provide practical support; and how to provide support within the context of a whole school approach. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Young people's narratives of depression

Authors:
ISSAKAINEN Mervi, HANNINEN Vilma
Journal article citation:
Journal of Youth Studies, 19(2), 2016, pp.237-250.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article reports on findings from a study, which aimed to gain insight into young people's depression as a part of their life course by analysing written accounts of 81 young Finnish people who self-identified as having been depressed. The participants’ accounts were seen as reflecting both their actual life and their narrative interpretations of it in relation to the prevailing normative conceptions regarding youth. The accounts can be grouped into four main story types. The story type referred to as growing up on a sidetrack depicts depression as having its origins in childhood adversities that hinder the realisation of normative goals. Falling off the track depicts how a young person's life can be derailed as a result of experiences that cause or exacerbate depression. In the story missing the track, depression is intertwined with one's experience of failure in meeting normative expectations, whereas the story questioning the track features the problematisation of such expectations. The results underscore the importance of tackling different adverse conditions in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood in a timely fashion, as well as the importance of therapy, counselling and guidance, which help young people to manage difficulties and depression in their life. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Young people's mental health

Author:
YOUTH SELECT COMMITTEE
Publisher:
British Youth Council
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
40
Place of publication:
London

Reports on the findings from the Youth Select Committee’s inquiry into mental health services for young people. The committee consists of eleven people, aged 13-18 and includes both elected and reserved seats to ensure a broad representation of interests and experience from all parts of the UK. The report deals with the current state of service, levels of funding and changes to service provision. It looks at quality of education, training for teachers and the role of schools and explores awareness of mental health and digital culture. The report includes a set of key recommendations. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and wellbeing among adolescents in Scotland: profile and trends

Authors:
BLACK Carolyn, MARTIN Chris
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
98
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report explores trends in mental health and wellbeing among adolescents in Scotland and the factors which best predict higher and lower mental health and wellbeing. The data shows that in the last three years there has been a marked change in mental health and wellbeing among pupils. While some aspects have improved (conduct problems, pro-social behaviour) or remained largely the same over time (hyperactivity, mental wellbeing), others have worsened (emotional problems and peer problems). One of the starkest changes is the extent to which mental health and wellbeing has changed among 15 year old girls, particularly in terms of their emotional wellbeing. In 2010, 28 per cent of 15 year olds girls had a borderline or abnormal emotional problems score. This increased to 41 per cent in 2013. Physical wellbeing was linked to mental health and wellbeing – those who had a limiting illness or disability reported poorer mental health and wellbeing than those that did not – particularly in relation to emotional problems. A number of activities appeared to have a protective effect against poor mental health and wellbeing (although causal links are likely to be complex). Expecting to go to university, belonging to a group or club and seeing friends, doing a hobby, reading books or playing a sport at least weekly were associated with better mental health and wellbeing. For girls, in particular, playing sport on a weekly basis was strongly related to lower levels of emotional and behavioural problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A general psychopathology factor in early adolescence

Authors:
PATALAY Praveetha, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 207(1), 2015, pp.15-22.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Background: Recently, a general psychopathology dimension reflecting common aspects among disorders has been identified in adults. This has not yet been considered in children and adolescents, where the focus has been on externalising and internalising dimensions. Aims: This study aimed to examine whether a general psychopathology could be identified in early in young people. It also sought to evaluate the validity and relevance of a hierarchical model that includes general psychopathology by exploring associations with sociodemographic predictors, educational correlates and social competencies. Method: Alternative factor models were estimated using self-reports of symptoms in a large community-based sample aged 11–13.5 years (N = 23 477) across 210 secondary schools in England, and resulting dimensions were assessed in terms of associations with external correlates and future functioning. Results: Both a traditional two-factor model and a bi-factor model with a general psychopathology bi-factor fitted the data well. The general psychopathology bi-factor best predicted future psychopathology and academic attainment. Associations with correlates and factor loadings are discussed. Conclusions: A general psychopathology factor, which is equal across genders, can be identified in young people. Its associations with correlates and future functioning indicate that investigating this factor can increase our understanding of the aetiology, risk and correlates of psychopathology. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Growing pains

Author:
GOODCHILD Sophie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2015, pp.8-9.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

As the number of children and young people with mental health issues continues to increase, the author looks at the possible reasons and want can be done to address the issues. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Horse power

Author:
MEACHIN Hayley
Journal article citation:
Professional Social Work, February 2015, pp.24-25.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

The author visits an equine assisted psychotherapy session in Surrey to see how it can help traumatised young people where other types of therapy have failed. A short case study describes how equine therapy helped a young person with issues around identity, self-esteem, mental health and relationships. (Original abstract)

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