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Book Full text available online for free

National programme for improving mental health and well-being small research projects initiative 2006: ... An exploration as to how personal narraitives are used in the promotion of recovery and social inclusion by mental health service users in Scotland

Authors:
ALTENBERGER Iris, MACKAY Rob
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Findings are presented from a study that aimed to explore and identify how personal narratives are used in Scotland to promote recovery and social inclusion by mental health service users. This study took the form of semi-structured interviews with 12 individuals in six locations across Scotland. This was followed up with a focus group discussion with four of the same individuals.

Book Full text available online for free

Inspirational journeys of hope

Author:
RECOVERY RENFREWSHIRE
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
34p.
Place of publication:
Paisley

'Stories of Hope' was an idea born out of the efforts of a small group of individuals belonging to a larger group called 'Recovery Renfrewshire'. This booklet is intended to inspire and motivate the reader. By sharing people's stories, the publishers hope to help change, in a small way, preconceived attitudes and beliefs around mental health.

Book Full text available online for free

Routes to recovery: collected wisdom from the SRN narrative research project

Author:
SCOTTISH RECOVERY NETWORK
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Routes to Recovery was developed by the Scottish Recovery Network (SRN) based on interviews with people in recovery from long-term mental health problems. The information and ideas described in this booklet came from Scottish Recovery Network’s Narrative Research Project. During this project 67 people around Scotland who described themselves as in recovery, or recovered, from a long-term mental health problem were interviewed. This publication is intended to highlight some of the things that people said that they had been able to do to support their recovery.

Journal article

Physical health and mental illness: listening to the voice of carers

Authors:
HAPPELL Brenda, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 26(2), 2017, pp.134-141.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Shortened life expectancy of people with mental illness is now widely known and the focus of research and policy activity. To date, research has primarily reflected perspectives of health professionals with limited attention to the views and opinions of those most closely affected. The voice of carers is particularly minimal, despite policy stipulating carer participation is required for mental health services. Aim: To present views and opinions of carers regarding physical health of the people they care for. Methods: Qualitative exploratory. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted with 13 people identifying as carers of a person with mental illness. Research was conducted in the Australian Capital Territory. Data analysis was based on the thematic framework of Braun and Clarke. Results: Two main themes were interaction between physical and mental health; and, carers’ own physical and mental health. Participants described the impact of mental illness and its treatments on physical health, including their own. Conclusions: Carers are acknowledged as crucial for the delivery of high quality mental health services. Therefore they have an important role to play in addressing the poor physical health of people with mental illness. Hearing their views and opinions is essential. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

All talk: experiencing user-led research

Authors:
GILLARD Steve, STACEY Estelle
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 9(2), May 2005, pp.27-30.
Publisher:
Emerald

The authors, of Slough User-Led Consultation (SULC) describe the benefits of people with experience of mental health problems undertaking research if the service users being interviewed are to feel able to talk freely and openly about their views and experiences of services.

Journal article

Turning the tables

Author:
SLOCOMBE Will
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, September 2012, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

A psychiatrist called Isabel Wilson (1895-1982) designed and created a group of table mats for a group of her colleagues. These table mats called, ‘Table Mats of the Famously Insane’, depicted various characters who might be called ‘famous’ and ‘insane’, including George III, an Egyptian god, and King Lear. They were accompanied by coasters designed around the topic of ‘causes and cures’ including drugs, the moon, and psychotherapy. Inspired by this story, CorpoArt, a small service user venture was commissioned to design their own set of table mats on the theme of famous psychiatrists and ‘causes and cures’. The aim was to introduce them to something of the history of psychiatry and how far it has come, and also to allow them to articulate their own experiences of treatment. The resulting mats are varied and interesting. Some focus on the designs of Wilson’s original mats. Another focuses on the ways in which mental health problems are ‘hidden’. Others are inspired by things that help people to cope, including activities such as cycling and the role of the mother. These mats may serve as a useful springboard into a conversation between service users and mental health professionals.

Book Full text available online for free

People with mental health conditions and pathways to work

Authors:
HUDSON Maria, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
131p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This qualitative research project aimed to identify how Jobcentre Plus Pathways to Work may better meet the needs of the mental health client group. The research explored the reasons why Pathways has yielded mixed results for clients with mental health conditions and what helps contribute to good outcomes. Fieldwork was carried out between January 2008 and February 2009 across 3 Jobcentre Plus districts. An iterative qualitative research design was used including interviews with Jobcentre Plus and non-Jobcentre Plus staff working with people with mental health conditions, incapacity benefit claimants with mental health conditions, and service provider workshops. The study focused on the areas of: Jobcentre Plus and non-Jobcentre Plus staff perceptions and experiences of working with people with mental health conditions and Pathways to Work; clients' attitudes towards and beliefs about work; clients’ experiences and perceptions of Work Focused Interviews; and clients’ experiences and perceptions of referrals; and other services and issues in entering and sustaining paid work. Many clients were satisfied with the help they received from Jobcentre Plus Pathways, though many mandatory clients felt that the opportunity to participate had not come at the right time for them. A range of suggestions are made for improvement to Pathways emerging from this research.

Journal article

Getting heard

Author:
LETTS Penny
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, June 2011, pp.14-16.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

A recent report by the Care Quality Commission and the Administrative Justice and Tribunals Council examines the views of patients appearing before mental health tribunals in England. This article summarises some of the key findings.

Journal article

The lived experiences of tobacco use, dependence, and cessation: insights and perspectives of people with mental illness

Author:
SOLWAY Erica Singer
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Work, 36(1), February 2011, pp.19-32.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Although smoking rates among the overall population in the United States have declined since the 1960s, smoking rates among people with mental illness remain high. A study based on focus group interviews with 26 individuals receiving outpatient mental health services who were current smokers, former smokers, or who had never smoked, attempted to develop a theory to understand the high prevalence of smoking from the perspectives of people with mental illness. This article discusses the findings in 4 categories: the lived experiences of never smoking, smoking, and the process of quitting; the role of tobacco use for people with mental illness; other forces that promote or discourage tobacco use, including institutional smoking policies; and tensions and complexities in addressing smoking with this group. It includes examples and brief extracts from the interviews. The author concludes that although living with mental illness may present unique challenges to giving up smoking, most people with mental illness have a strong wish to stop smoking, and that social workers can play an important role in addressing tobacco use among people with mental illness through implementing policy changes.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Rethink blogs

Author:
RETHINK
Publisher:
Rethink
Place of publication:
London

Rethink's blog area contains posts from a range of Rethink blog writers who have experienced mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder either directly, or indirectly as a carer or sibling.

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