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Journal article

Assessing and treating sexual offenders with mental disorders

Authors:
LORD Alex, PERKINS Derek
Journal article citation:
Journal of Forensic Practice, 16(2), 2014, pp.94-109.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to increase our understanding of the role of mental disorder in sexual offending as well as identifying innovations in assessment and treatment with offenders who present with these typically complex risks and needs. Design/methodology/approach: The converging literatures on “good lives” and other developments in sexual offender treatment are compared with recovery from mental disorder and what is known about the particular needs and characteristics of sexual offenders with mental illness and severe personality disorder (PD). Findings: A key outcome of this review is that many mentally disordered sexual offenders have similar needs to those in prison and the community but there are particular challenges posed by severe PD, paraphilias and the relatively rare individuals whose offending is functionally linked to psychotic symptoms. Practical implications: Practical implications include the need for case formulation of complex needs related to mental disorder using direct and indirect measures of attitudes and interests. Treatment needs to be responsive to very different personality and mental health presentations as well as problems with offending and cognitive schemas. Direct functional links between mental health symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations are very rare in practice and are usually secondary to PD and sexual offending issues. In practice, treatment promoting recovery from mental disorder is highly compatible with the “good lives” approach to sexual offender treatment. Staff development, supervision and support are particularly important for staff treating mentally disordered sexual offenders. Originality/value: It is argued that mentally disordered sexual offenders are an under-researched sub-group within the wider sexual offender population. This paper brings together the relatively limited literature on treatment with examples of recent treatment innovations, multi-modal assessment approaches and reviews of research on the needs of this relatively uncommon but highly risky group. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Failure and delay in treatment-seeking across anxiety disorders

Authors:
JOHNSON Emily M., COLES Meredith E.
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 49(6), 2013, pp.668-674.
Publisher:
Springer

Anxiety disorders are a significant mental health problem. Despite the availability of effective treatments most sufferers do not seek help. The current study assesses delays in treatment-seeking, failure to seek treatment, and reasons for delaying treatment for individuals with anxiety disorders. Data were drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiological Surveys including 3,805 participants and analyses focused on treatment-seeking variables. Results indicate that individuals with anxiety disorders are less likely to seek treatment from a professional and more likely to experience delays in obtaining both any treatment, and effective treatment, than individuals with other forms of mental illness (in this case unipolar depression or substance use disorders). Deficits in mental health literacy (knowledge and beliefs about mental illness) were commonly endorsed as reasons for having delayed seeking treatment. The current study highlights the importance of improving knowledge about anxiety disorders to improve treatment-seeking. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Helping patients to cope with seasonal affective disorder

Author:
HARION Nerys
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 13.11.07, 2007, pp.25-26.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

The author looks at the causes and symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder and types of treatment available.

Journal article

Learning to feel

Author:
BEXSON Tina
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, November 2004, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Reports on a new treatment at St Andrew's Hospital, Northampton for borderline personality disorder, a controversial diagnosis about which psychiatrists often disagree and which Mind has dubbed a 'dustbin diagnosis' for people who are simply 'difficult' or 'different'. Called dialectical behaviour therapy, it aims to reduce self-destructive behaviours and address what undermines their ability to stay in treatment and professionals' motivation to carry on helping them.

Journal article

The listeners

Author:
MOORE Wendy
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 103, May 2000, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
MIND

Profiles the radical work and far-reaching impact of Marius Romme and Sandra Escher, catalysts of the hearing voices movement.

Journal article

Accepting the inner voices

Author:
BAKER Paul
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 2.8.95, 1995, pp.59-61.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Hearing internal voices is relatively common, and many people not considered to have mental health problems have experienced them.

Book

The voice inside: a practical guide to coping with hearing voices

Author:
BAKER Paul
Publisher:
Hearing Voices Network
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
24p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Manchester

Provides an introduction to a new way of thinking about 'hearing voices'. Looks at what it is like to hear voices, why does it start and how people can cope better with the experience. Also provides further information about the Hearing Voices Network.

Journal article

Hearing is believing

Author:
LINEHAN Tim
Journal article citation:
New Statesman and Society, 26.3.93, 1993, pp.18-19.

The Hearing Voices Network argue that 'hearing voices' should be accepted as a variation of normal human behaviour not as a sickness and that the response of psychiatry to try to eliminate the voices through medication is misguided.

Journal article

Alcoholism and coexisting psychiatric disorders

Author:
MULINSKI Paul
Journal article citation:
Social Casework, 69(3), March 1988, pp.141-146.
Publisher:
Alliance for Children and Families

Stresses the importance of treating both problems at the same time.

Journal article

“You don’t have anorexia, you just want to look like a celebrity”: perceived stigma in individuals with anorexia nervosa

Authors:
DIMITROPOULOS Gina, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(1), 2016, pp.47-54.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Minimal research has been conducted on how individuals with Anorexia nervosa (AN) undergoing treatment perceive public stigma. Aim: Explore how affected individuals with AN believe the general public perceives AN. Method: Using thematic analysis, 19 participants with AN were interviewed at the beginning of treatment. Results: Three interrelated themes were ascertained: (1) AN is not an illness; (2) eating disorder behaviours are volitional and the public endorses a socio-cultural explanation for the disorder; 3) affected individuals delay disclosing their illness and experience shame engaging in intensive treatment for AN as a result of their perception of stigma. Conclusions: Individuals with AN viewed the public as trivializing AN by viewing behaviours as within their control and by attributing eating disorder behaviours solely to socio-cultural factors. Participants believed that the public minimizes the challenges associated with treatment. Findings suggest that clinical interventions targeting stigma are required to counteract perceptions held by service users regarding how others view their illness. “Mental health literacy” interventions are needed for health professionals working with high risk groups likely to avoid seeking help due to fears of stigmatisation. (Publisher abstract)

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