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Book Full text available online for free

Trauma and young offenders: a review of the research and practice literature: research summary

Authors:
LIDDLE Mark, et al
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Reports on findings from a review of research and practice literature concerning trauma in the backgrounds of young offenders. It aims to highlight what is currently known about trauma within the population of young offenders, and to identify the importance of this knowledge for effective resettlement practice. Searches were carried out using the internet and academic databases, focusing on young people up to the age of 25. The review focuses on: definitions of trauma and the different ways in which trauma has been understood in the research and practice literature; the prevalence of different types of traumatic childhood and adolescent experiences in the backgrounds of young offenders; the effects that such trauma can have on young people in the short-term, and its longer term impacts on emotional, social, and neurological development; the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour, including the extent of their capacity to comply with youth justice interventions. The evidence suggests that offenders have a disproportionate amount of childhood and adolescent trauma in their backgrounds and that some of the impacts of such trauma appear to be linked to offending behaviour. It also looks at the implications that an understanding of trauma and its effects might have for resettlement work undertaken with young custody-leavers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Young offenders and trauma: experience and impact. A practitioners guide.

Authors:
WRIGHT Sam, LIDDLE Mark, GOODFELLOW Pippa
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This practitioner briefing aims to highlight what is currently known about the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour and development. Traumatic experiences very common in the backgrounds of young offenders and but the impact of these experiences can limit their ability to engage with opportunities and can seriously narrow their life chances. It is therefore critical that resettlement practitioners are aware of issues concerning trauma because attempting to address behaviour without understanding a young person’s underlying difficulties can result in unsuccessful and sometimes counterproductive interventions. The briefing considers the type of events that can cause trauma, the impact trauma can have, presents data to show the greater prevalence of mental health conditions and related issues such as substance dependency offenders; and looks at what this means for resettlement practice with young offenders. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Not one word of welcome

Author:
NEUSTATTER Angela
Journal article citation:
Young Minds Magazine, 93, March 2008, pp.15-17.
Publisher:
YoungMinds

The author looks at the difficulties facing unaccompanied asylum seeking children. She discusses the dangers of failing acknowledge their mental health needs.

Journal article

The compulsion to repeat

Author:
RUSSELL Paul Libbey
Journal article citation:
Smith College Studies in Social Work, 76(1/2), 2006, pp.33-49.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article focuses on the compulsion to repeat in psychotherapy. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Barriers to assessment and treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and other trauma-related problems in people with severe mental illness: clinician perspectives

Authors:
SALYERS Michelle P., et al
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 40(1), February 2004, pp.17-31.
Publisher:
Springer

The authors conducted a state-wide survey of 251 clinicians serving people with severe mental illness (SMI) in community support programs, to identify barriers to the diagnosis and treatment of PTSD and other trauma-related problems. Most clinicians did not feel competent to effectively treat these problems. Competence/confidence and belief in utility of intervention were positively related to the percentage of clients with whom trauma and PTSD had been discussed, documented in charts, and addressed directly in treatment. Clinicians need training that develops skills and knowledge as well as conveys the value of addressing PTSD and other trauma-related problems in people with SMI.

Book

Washing my life away: surviving obsessive-compulsive disorder

Author:
DEANE Ruth
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
95p.
Place of publication:
London

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) affects one in fifty people. In this personal account the author shares her own experience as an OCD sufferer, from the first innocuous signs of onset to the devastating effect of the condition on her relationships with her family and friends, her self-esteem and her marriage. The author takes the reader on a moving, honest and at times light-hearted journey, from washing her hands until they cracked and bled, to hospital admission and eventual management and recovery from OCD.

Book Full text available online for free

Developing trauma-informed resettlement for young custody leavers. A practitioner's guide

Authors:
WRIGHT Sam, LIDDLE Mark, GOODFELLOW Pippa
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This practitioner briefing outlines key features of trauma-informed approaches to working with young offenders leaving custody. It highlights the importance of carrying out resettlement work with an awareness of possible trauma in the backgrounds of young custody leavers and with an understanding of the way in which such trauma can affect behaviour and engagement. It outlines four key features: staff awareness, training and support; assessment; approaches to working with young offenders; and consideration of the therapeutic window. It also looks at the implications that trauma and its effects might have for resettlement practice and at the impact the right kind of interventions can have. It concludes that developing trauma-informed approaches to resettlement work has the potential to deliver more productive and long-standing positive impacts for custody leavers, particularly those considered to be the most difficult to engage. A short practice example of the iCoN clinically-led outreach trauma service is included. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A statewide introduction of trauma-informed care in a child welfare system

Authors:
KRAMER Teresa L., et al
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 35(1), 2013, pp.19-24.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Most children in the care of the child welfare system have been exposed to multiple traumas in addition to the stressor of being removed from their home. Because the risk for mental health problems following exposure to trauma is high, a critical need exists to introduce trauma-informed practices into the child welfare system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate initial stages of a trauma-informed training program for the Arkansas Division of Child and Family Services (DCFS). In Phase 1, 102 (75%) of DCFS area directors and supervisors participated in 10 regional, two-day workshops modeled after the National Child and Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) trauma-informed training for child welfare. Pre- and post-training evaluations demonstrated significant improvements in participants' knowledge of trauma-informed practices. A three-month follow-up with directors and supervisors indicated that use of trauma-informed practices increased significantly and that such changes were correlated with pre- versus post-training improvement in knowledge. Most participants were able to partially implement action steps established at the time of training; however, a number of barriers were cited as preventing full implementation, including time constraints, heavy caseloads, lack of staff, and limited resources. Results are discussed in light of plans under way for Phase II training for all DCFS front-line staff. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

From nightmare to memories

Author:
LOGIE Robin
Journal article citation:
Therapy Today, 23(6), July 2012, pp.28-31.
Publisher:
British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) is a form of therapy mainly used in treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related mental health problems. This article outlines the development of EMDR and its use as a psychological treatment, and describes the process of EMDR therapy sessions from the therapist's and client's perspectives. It reports that use of EMDR has become more diverse and looks in particular at its application in 3 areas: depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and pain. It discusses the effectiveness of EMDR treatment and research into its application. It also briefly explains how to train in EMDR.

Book

Unfitting stories: narrative approaches to disease, disability, and trauma

Authors:
RAOUL Valerie, et al
Publisher:
Wilfrid Laurier University Press
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
360p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Waterloo, ON

Unfitting Stories: Narrative Approaches to Disease, Disability, and Trauma illustrates how stories about ill health and suffering have been produced and received from a variety of perspectives. Bringing together the work of Canadian researchers, health professionals, and people with lived experiences of disease, disability, or trauma, it addresses central issues about authority in medical and personal narratives and the value of cross- or interdisciplinary research in understanding such experiences. The book considers the aesthetic dimensions of health-related stories with literary readings that look at how personal accounts of disease, disability, and trauma are crafted by writers and filmmakers into published works. Topics range from psychiatric hospitalization and aestheticizing cancer, to father-daughter incest in film. The collection also deals with the therapeutic or transformative effect of stories with essays about men, sport, and spinal cord injury; narrative teaching at L’Arche (a faith-based network of communities inclusive of people with developmental disabilities); and the construction of a “schizophrenic” identity. A final section examines the polemical functions of narrative, directing attention to the professional and political contexts within which stories are constructed and exchanged. Topics include ableist limits on self-narration; drug addiction and the disease model; and narratives of trauma and Aboriginal post-secondary students. Unfitting Stories is essential reading for researchers using narrative methods or materials, for teachers, students, and professionals working in the field of health services, and for concerned consumers of the health care system. It deals with practical problems relevant to policy-makers as well as theoretical issues of interest to specialists in bioethics, gender analysis, and narrative theory

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