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Book

A guide to organising local studies

Author:
GOOD PRACTICES IN MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Good Practices in Mental Health
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
32p.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and wellbeing among adolescents in Scotland: profile and trends

Authors:
BLACK Carolyn, MARTIN Chris
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
98
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report explores trends in mental health and wellbeing among adolescents in Scotland and the factors which best predict higher and lower mental health and wellbeing. The data shows that in the last three years there has been a marked change in mental health and wellbeing among pupils. While some aspects have improved (conduct problems, pro-social behaviour) or remained largely the same over time (hyperactivity, mental wellbeing), others have worsened (emotional problems and peer problems). One of the starkest changes is the extent to which mental health and wellbeing has changed among 15 year old girls, particularly in terms of their emotional wellbeing. In 2010, 28 per cent of 15 year olds girls had a borderline or abnormal emotional problems score. This increased to 41 per cent in 2013. Physical wellbeing was linked to mental health and wellbeing – those who had a limiting illness or disability reported poorer mental health and wellbeing than those that did not – particularly in relation to emotional problems. A number of activities appeared to have a protective effect against poor mental health and wellbeing (although causal links are likely to be complex). Expecting to go to university, belonging to a group or club and seeing friends, doing a hobby, reading books or playing a sport at least weekly were associated with better mental health and wellbeing. For girls, in particular, playing sport on a weekly basis was strongly related to lower levels of emotional and behavioural problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mental health and psychological support in UK armed forces personnel deployed to Afghanistan in 2010 and 2011

Authors:
JONES Norman, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 204(2), 2014, pp.157-162.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Data are presented relating to the burden of mental ill health in UK armed forces personnel and the effect of support measures including operational, family, welfare and medical support obtained on two occasions some 18 months apart. A total of 2794 personnel completed a survey while deployed to Afghanistan; 1363 in 2011 and 1431 in 2010. Their responses were compared and contrasted. The prevalence of self-report mental health disorder was low and not significantly different between the surveys; the rates of probable post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were 2.8% in 2010 and 1.8% in 2011; for common mental health disorders the rates were 17.0% and 16.0% respectively. Remembering receiving predeployment psychoeducation, perceptions of good leadership and good family support were all significantly associated with better mental health. Seeking support from non-medical sources and reporting sick for medical reasons were both significantly associated with poorer mental health. Over a period of 18 months, deployment mental health symptoms in UK armed forces personnel were fewer than those obtained from a military population sample despite continuing deployment in a high-threat context and were associated with perceptions of support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

What does social inclusion mean?

Author:
BERTRAM Mark
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 12(2), May 2008, pp.24-27.
Publisher:
Emerald

Reports on findings from a survey of over 150 service users, through one-to-one interviews and discussion groups, which asked what the term 'social inclusion' meant to them. It also gathered their thoughts on whether mental health services could help people in the area of social inclusion.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Childhood IQ in relation to later psychiatric disorder. Evidence from a Danish birth cohort study

Authors:
BATTY G. David, MORTENSEN Erik L., OSLER Merete
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 187(2), August 2005, pp.180-181.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Studies examining the relationship between early-life IQ and the risk of subsequent psychiatric disorder in adulthood are scarce. In the present investigation, the childhood IQ scores of 7022 singleton-born Danish males were linked to psychiatric hospital discharge records in adulthood. IQ scores were inversely related to the risk of total psychiatric illness, with the highest levels apparent in the lowest scoring IQ group. Adjusting for paternal occupational social class and birth weight had only a small attenuating effect. Low childhood IQ may have an aetiological role in the development of adult total psychiatric disorder.

Journal article

What do surveys of public attitudes to mental health problems really mean (and do we mean what we say)?

Author:
SMITH Michael
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 3(4), December 2004, pp.40-47.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Campaigns to improve public attitudes to people with mental health problems have yet to show significant impact according to national surveys, but how reliable are the surveys? Reviews recent research and argues that the findings are complicated by methodological bias and doubts about the public's ability to acknowledge prejudice honestly.

Journal article

Meeting mental health needs: client satisfaction: a user-led approach

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Prison Service Journal, 155, September 2004, pp.19-20.
Publisher:
Her Majesty's Prison Service of England and Wales

There has been growing use of client surveys across both health and social care over the past 20 years. While standard user satisfaction surveys undoubtedly provide an opportunity for users' views to be heard, the degree to which they can be considered client-led is questionable. Revolving Doors Agency trained service users to interview others. Findings included: 70% were satisfied, 25% moderately satisfied, and attitudes are positive, but 45% made suggestions for improvement. Detailed results are given together with what was done and why, recommendations, and what will change as a result.

Journal article

Measuring quality of life: a new and practical survey instrument

Authors:
GREENLEY James R., GREENBERG Jan Steven, BROWN Roger
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 42(3), September 1997, pp.244-254.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Despite increasing recognition of the importance of measuring the quality of life (QOL) of people with severe mental illness, such assessments are seldom carried out because of the lack of an efficient, easy-to-use, and valid measurement instrument. To facilitate the gathering of QOL information in evaluation, programme improvement, or other efforts, the authors present a new short self-administered questionnaire called the Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ).

Journal article

Social sensitivity: a shared feature of all phobias

Authors:
STRAVYNSKI A., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 34(3), September 1995, pp.343-351.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The prominence of a variety of social fears among types of phobia was examined.

Journal article

Coping strategies and phobias: the relationship between fears, phobias and methods of coping with stressors

Authors:
DAVEY Graham C., BURGESS Ian, RASHES Rachel
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 34(3), September 1995, pp.423-434.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Two studies are described which assessed the extent to which fears and phobias are associated with particular types of strategies for coping with stress.

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