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Journal article

Seriousness and lethality of attempted suicide: a systematic review

Authors:
LIOTTA Marco, MENTO Carmela, SETTINERIC Salvatore
Journal article citation:
Aggression and Violent Behavior, 21, 2015, pp.97-109.
Publisher:
Elsevier

The concepts of seriousness and lethality of suicide attempts are essential to the assessment of suicide risk and, therefore, to prevent suicidal behaviour. A review of the literature was conducted in order to identify the most important factors that increase the seriousness and potential lethality of attempted suicide. The factors identified were incorporated into four main categories: progression along the suicide continuum; age and gender; mental disorders and method of suicide. Although each category contains independent risk factors for the severity of the suicide attempt, their combination both within and, above all, between them, has emerged as the most important predictor of suicidal behaviour. (Publisher abstract)

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Statistical update on suicide

Author:
GREAT BRITAiN. Department of Health. Health Improvement Analytical Team
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
11
Place of publication:
London

In September 2012, a statistical document presenting key statistics and relevant information was published alongside ‘Preventing suicide in England: a cross-government outcomes strategy to save lives’. This document provides an update with latest available information, in which the term suicide refers to deaths from both intentional self-harm and injury or poisoning of undetermined intent. It includes trend information on deaths in particular circumstances and by age group. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Patient suicide: the impact of service changes: a UK wide study

Author:
NATIONAL CONFIDENTIAL INQUIRY INTO SUICIDE AND HOMICIDE BY PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS
Publisher:
University of Manchester
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
18
Place of publication:
Manchester

The National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness (NCISH) aimed to examine the relationship between mental health service changes and patient suicide rates in the UK. The specific objectives were to investigate: the take up of service changes over time; the association between the number of service changes implemented and suicide rates; the association between service changes and suicide rates before and after their implementation; and the effect of individual service changes on specific patient sub-groups. A detailed service questionnaire was sent to all mental health services in the UK. Questions related to whether specific policies or service changes had been implemented. 17 recommendations and service changes were selected for consideration, reflecting their clinical and policy importance. (Edited publisher abstract)

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The national confidential inquiry into suicide and homicide by people with mental Illness. Annual report: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales

Authors:
APPLEBY Louis, et al
Publisher:
University of Manchester. Centre for Mental Health and Risk. National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
135
Place of publication:
Manchester

It is reported that suicide by mental health patients had risen, to 1,333 deaths in 2011 (England), following a previous fall. The rise probably reflected the rise in suicide in the general population, which had been attributed to existing economic difficulties. The proportion of patients dying by suicide who were unemployed had risen in England and Northern Ireland. An apparent rise in Scotland was largely explained by a coding change, but the adjusted figure for patient suicide was still comparatively high. Increases in Wales and Northern Ireland were based on small numbers and should be treated with caution. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mental illness and suicide in British South Asian adults

Author:
INEICHEN Bernard
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Religion and Culture, 15(3), 2012, pp.235-250.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

South Asians make up about 4.7% of the UK population. Studies from the 1990s concluded that the mental health of British people of South Asian origin was at least as good, and probably rather better, than that of the ethnic majority. Their rates for mental illness and suicide have been shown by some researchers to be lower than that of the total UK population, using a variety of measures, and considering many psychiatric conditions. This paper reviews the literature on the extent of mental illness among British South Asian adults, and explores aspects of their service use, and their attitudes to mental illness. Some distinguishing features of British South Asian mental health are identified, including areas justifying further research. The author concludes that variations in the South Asian population including generation, country of origin, religion, class, wealth and geography, emphasise the growing need to disaggregate this population when presenting data about them.

Journal article

Attributable risk of psychiatric and socio-economic factors for suicide from individual-level, population-based studies: a systematic review

Authors:
LI Zhuoyang, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 72(4), February 2011, pp.608-616.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Fourteen case-control and cohort studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Although relative risk for suicide was much higher for psychiatric disorders compared to socioeconomic factors, the population attributable risk for some socioeconomic factors and some psychiatric disorders were found to be of the same order of magnitude. The suggestion that public health policy on suicide prevention should focus on lower risk, but higher prevalence, socioeconomic factors is discussed.

Journal article

Targeting suicide - qualitative analysis of suicide prevention strategy documents in England and Finland

Authors:
SOLIN Pia, NIKANDER Pirjo
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 16(1), March 2011, pp.5-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

In a policy context, suicide is not easily defined, understood or prevented. It leaves a long-lasting mental and social burden on those left behind, as well as direct consequences on the health sector and society as a whole. The means policy itself is often difficult to turn into action. This review details the interpretative repertoires found in the suicide prevention strategies of both England and Finland, and examines their potential functions and audiences. In both nations, the political repertoire was formed from four themes: the public health epidemiology; the everyday; the preventive action; and the reflective repertoires. The paper outlines the polyphonic and multi-layered nature of these policy documents and how different repertoires may be used for various functions. The paper concludes that, while the polyphonic nature of policy documents is necessary to reach a wider readership and to capture suicide as a controversial phenomenon, its argumentative style may also undermine some of the measures and actions recommended by policy itself.

Journal article

Suicide ideation in older adults: relationship to mental health problems and service use

Authors:
CORNA Laurie M., CAIRNEY John, STREINER David L.
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 50(6), December 2010, pp.785-797.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of suicide ideation among community-dwelling older adults and the relationship between suicide ideation, major psychiatric disorder, and mental health service use. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 1.2: Mental Health and Well-being (CCHS 1.2) for all adults aged 55 years and over was used to estimate the prevalence of suicide ideation and the prevalence of major psychiatric disorder and service use among ideators versus nonideators. Using multivariate models, the study considered the sociodemographic, social, and mental health correlates of suicide ideation and mental health care use. The results showed that more than 2% of older adults reported suicide ideation in the past year and more than two thirds of these respondents did not meet the criteria for any of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders assessed in the CCHS 1.2. In multivariate models, being male, younger, or widowed, reporting lower social support and higher psychological distress increased the likelihood of suicide ideation. More than 50% of the respondents who reported suicidal thoughts did not access any type of mental health care use. The article concludes that, although suicide ideation is associated with depression and anxiety disorders, many older adults with suicidal thoughts do not meet the criteria for these clinical disorders.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The funny side of suicide

Author:
DRINKWATER Mark
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 5.8.10, 2010, p.26.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The author talks to the comic Taylor Mackenzie about his production at the Edinburgh Festival which is about his suicide attempt and the 15 weeks that led up to it. Six other shows at the Edinburgh Festival about disability are also listed.

Journal article

Mental health and firearms in community-based surveys: implications for suicide prevention

Authors:
SORENSON Susan B., VITTES Katherine A.
Journal article citation:
Evaluation Review, 32(3), June 2008, pp.239-256.
Publisher:
Sage

Suicide rates in the United States are higher among those who own or live in a household with a hand gun. This article examines the association between hand gun ownership and mental health, another risk factor for suicide. Data from the General Social Survey, a series of surveys of U.S. adults, are analyzed to compare general emotional and mental health, sadness and depression, functional mental health, and mental health help seeking among gun owners, persons who do not own but live in a household with a gun, and those who do not own a gun. After taking into account a few basic demographic characteristics associated with both variables, there appears to be no association between mental health and gun ownership. Nor is there any association between mental health and living in a household with a firearm. Findings suggest that the high risk of suicide among those who own or live in a household with a gun is not related to poor mental health. Implications for prevention are discussed.

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