Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 359

Journal article

Working with students with psychiatric disabilities or other emotional problems

Author:
MAZZA Elena T.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 35(4), 2015, pp.425-448.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The professional literature on gatekeeping in social work education has grown; however, there remains a dearth in the literature regarding how educators truly work to engage students who are experiencing a psychiatric disability or other emotional problem. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 26 social work educators from 22 colleges and universities in the United States. Practice wisdoms emerged as interwoven strategies which encourage proactive interventions that accentuate students’ strengths through socially just opportunities. Identified strategies include having an awareness of psychosocial and environmental stressors that students may be experiencing, recognizing warning signs, approaching students, and building appropriate faculty-student relationships. (Publisher abstract)

Book

Madness, distress and the politics of disablement

Editors:
SPANDLER Helen, ANDERSON Jill, SAPEY Bob
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
320
Place of publication:
Bristol

This book explores the challenges of applying disability theory and policy, including the social model of disability, to madness and distress. It brings together leading scholars and activists from Europe, North America, Australia and India, to explore the relationship between madness, distress and disability. Whether mental health problems should be viewed as disabilities is a pressing concern, especially since the inclusion of psychosocial disability in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This book is aimed at policy makers, practitioners, activists and academics. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The effects of mental illness on families within faith communities

Authors:
ROGERS Edward B., STANFORD Matthew, GARLAND Diana R.
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Religion and Culture, 15(3), 2012, pp.301-313.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

It is understood that families are negatively affected when a member has a mental illness. This study investigated the experiences and values of families caring for a mentally ill loved one within the context of a Christian faith community. Almost 6,000 participants in 24 churches representing four Protestant denominations completed a survey describing their family's stresses, strengths, faith practices, and desires for assistance from the congregation. Findings showed mental illness in 27% of families, with those families reporting twice as many stressors on average. Families with mental illness present scored lower on measures of family strength and faith practices. Help with mental illness was a priority for those families affected by it, but ignored by others in the congregation. These findings indicate that mental illness is not only prevalent in church communities, but is accompanied by significant distress that often goes unnoticed. The authors concluded that partnerships between mental health providers and congregations may help to raise awareness in the church community.

Journal article

Stress in the city

Author:
CHAPMAN Leslie
Journal article citation:
Therapy Today, 23(1), February 2012, pp.14-18.
Publisher:
British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

This article considers the mental health crisis emerging in the City of London. Anecdotal evidence from media articles and blogs suggests that mental ill health in the City is a significant problem and a growing one. The article argues that the culture in the City environment is psychologically toxic, with a complete disregard for the wider human and social consequences of working there. The focus is on working tremendously long hours and amassing as much wealth as possible. Workers have little or no empathy with each other, and those who can’t keep up risk losing their jobs. Despite this, there appears to be a widespread sense of denial that these mental health problems exist. This culture of denial means that treating such problems and encouraging people to seek help presents a major challenge for mental health practitioners. Furthermore, the mental health practitioners working in this environment see their role as helping their clients to work within such an environment rather than question the culture in which they are working. The article concludes by questioning whether these practitioners may be colluding in sustaining the psychological toxicity of this environment.

Journal article

Mental health disparities research: the impact of within and between group analyses on tests of social stress hypotheses

Authors:
SCHWARTZ Sharon, MEYER Ilan H.
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 70(8), April 2010, pp.1111-1118.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Social stress models are the predominant theoretical frame for studies of the relationship between social factors and mental health, and propose that prejudice, discrimination and related social ills add a unique source of stress that may explain how socially disadvantaged populations produce mental health problems. Noting that researchers have used a variety of methodological approaches to study this hypothesis, the authors of this paper argue that there are disconcerting inconsistencies in research findings that have not been sufficiently considered, particularly the distinction between studies of within group and studies of between groups variation. The article covers the premises of social stress theory, empirical findings in studies of social stress, and divergence in sources of evidence, with discussion of the inference for social stress as a cause of mental disorders.

Book

Working to recovery: victim to victor III

Authors:
TAYLOR Karen, COLEMAN Ron, BAKER Paul
Publisher:
P and P
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
64p.
Place of publication:
Dundee
Edition:
2nd ed.

This book has been written to fill a gap in the available literature on how to overcome mental distress.  It has been written especially for people undergoing emotionally distressing experience and particularly those people who have been diagnosed as having a mental illness.  This is a workbook and as the name implies it is intended to be a practical tool in assisting you in your recovery

Journal article

Predicting longitudinal patterns of psychological distress in older husband caregivers: further analysis of existing data

Authors:
LEVESQUE Louise, et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 12(3), May 2008, pp.333-342.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Further analysis of existing data from a previous longitudinal Canadian study of older husband caregivers sought to determine whether primary objective and subjective stressors drawn from Pearlin's model of caregiving could predict three patterns of psychological distress observed in the sample over 1 year: (a) stable high (n = 115), (b) stable low (n = 44), and (c) rising (n = 46). Results of discriminant function analyses show that subjective stressors (level of role overload, role captivity and relational deprivation) at baseline, distinguish the stable low group of husbands from the stable-high. The results suggest that there is considerable stability over time. Many husband caregivers report high-psychological distress and need help, whereas there is a need of preventive interventions to keep psychological distress low. Implications for singular interventions.

Book Full text available online for free

Another assault: Mind's campaign for equal access to justice for people with mental health problems

Author:
MIND
Publisher:
MIND
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
26p.
Place of publication:
London

Too often people with mental health problems are reluctant to report crimes.One victim told Mind that contact with the police exposed them to yet more discrimination and vulnerability: "The system of investigation is another assault."Mind's new research exposes shockingly high levels of bullying, harassment and exploitation experienced by people with mental health problems while living in the community. Mind believes everyone has an equal right to personal safety, and that people  experiencing mental distress have the same rights to justice as anyone else.

Journal article

The effect of pre-employment factors on job control, job strain and psychological distress: a 31-year longitudinal study

Authors:
ELOVAINIO Marko, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 65(2), July 2007, pp.187-199.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This study examined the role of pre-employment factors, such as maternal antenatal depression, low birth weight, childhood socioeconomic position, early adolescence health risk behaviours and academic performance, in the relationship between work characteristics (low job control and high job demands, or job strain) and psychological distress at age 31. The data of 2062 women and 2231 men was derived from the prospective unselected population-based Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study. Results of linear regression models showed that being female, father's low socioeconomic position, and poor academic achievement in adolescence were linked to low control and high job strain jobs at age 31, and that low control and high job strain were associated with psychological distress at age 31. Although having lower school grades, high absence rate from school, and moderate alcohol consumption at age 14 were significant predictors of psychological distress at age 31, the associations between job control, job strain and psychological distress remained after controlling for these and other pre-employment effects. As such, pre-employment factors do seem to link people to risky work environments, which in turn seem to relate strongly to psychological distress. However, the relationship between pre-employment factors and later psychological distress in adulthood is not completely explained by job environment.

Journal article

The role of social capital in reducing non-specific psychological distress: the importance of controlling for omitted variable bias

Authors:
SCHEFFLER Richard M., BROWN Timothy T., RICE Jennifer K.
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 65(4), August 2007, pp.842-854.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This paper examines the relationship between area-level social capital and non-specific psychological distress. It demonstrates that not controlling for non-time-varying omitted variables can seriously bias research findings. The authors use data from three cross-sections of the US National Health Interview Survey (1999, 2000, and 2001): 37,172 observations nested within 58 Metropolitan Statistical Areas. Data was also added from the Area Resource File and County Business Patterns. A validated measure of social capital, the Petris Social Capital Index (PSCI), which measures structural social capital was used. The authors estimate a two-level multilevel linear model with a random intercept. Non-specific psychological distress is measured using a valid and reliable indicator, the K6. Individual-level variables include sex, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, family income, smoking status, exercise status, and number of visits to a health professional. Area-level covariates include the PSCI, the unemployment rate, psychiatrists per 1000 population, non-psychiatric physicians per 1000 population, and area-level indicators to account for non-time-varying area-level omitted variable bias. Time dummies are also included. It was found that lagged area-level social capital is negatively related to non-specific psychological distress among individuals whose family income is less than the median. These associations are much larger when we control for non-time-varying area-level omitted variables.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts