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Book

Guardianship: under the Mental Health Act 1983; England 2001

Editors:
THATTI Paul, DOWNEY Kevin
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
14p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Guardianship: under the Mental Health Act 1983; England 2000

Editors:
KILBEY Tracie, SMITH Gerry, BROWN Ann-Marie
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
12p.,tables.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article Full text available online for free

Income inequality and the prevalence of common mental disorders in Britain

Authors:
WEICH Scott, LEWIS Glyn, JENKINS Stephen P.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 178, March 2001, pp.222-227.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This study tests the hypothesis that individuals in regions of Britain with the highest income inequality have a higher prevalence of the common mental disorders, after adjusting for individual income. The association between income inequality and prevalence of the common mental disorders varied with individual income level. Among persons with the highest incomes, common mental disorders were more frequent in regions with greater income inequality. The opposite was true for those with the lowest incomes. Income inequality was associated with worse mental health among the most affluent individuals.

Book

Inpatients formally detained in hospitals under the Mental Health Act 1983 and other legislation, England: 1990-1991 to 2000-2001

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
London

This bulletin summarises information about people detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 in NHS facilities, including high security psychiatric hospitals and private nursing homes.

Journal article

Socio-demographic differences in general practice consultation rates for psychiatric disorders among patients aged 16-64

Authors:
SHAH Rajen, McNIECE Rosie, MAJEED Azeem
Journal article citation:
Health Statistics Quarterly, 11, Autumn 2001, pp.5-10.
Publisher:
Office for National Statistics

Examines data from the Fourth National Survey of Morbidity in General Practice to examine the relationship between socio-demographic factors and consultation rates for psychiatric disorders. Found that consultation rates increased for all diagnoses from Social Class I to V. Women had consultation rates 82 per cent higher than men. Although overall consultation rates were highest in Whites, Afro-Caribbeans had higher consultation rates for schizophrenia and personality disorders. Age, sex and ethnicity were associated with substantially differing consultation rates for psychiatric disorders in general practice.

Journal article

The prevalence and characteristics of co-occurring serious mental illness (SMI) and substance abuse or dependence in the patients of Adult Mental Health and Addictions Services in eastern Dorset

Authors:
VIRGO Nick, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 10(2), April 2001, pp.175-188.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Researchers interviewed key workers of all NHS inpatient, day-patient and outpatient Adult Mental Health (AMH) and Addictions Services in eastern Dorset. 'Dual diagnosis' (co-occurring severe mental illness (SMI) and substance abuse or dependence) occurred in 12% of addictions, 12% of all AMH, and 20% of SMI, AMH patients (range 10% rehabilitation to 41% acute wards). Most 'dual diagnoses' in AMH were alcohol and/or cannabis abuse with psychoses, and in addictions heroin dependence and/or alcohol abuse or dependence with depression. Compared with other AMH, SMI patients, AMH 'dual diagnosed' patients were younger; were more often male, in less stable accommodation, unemployed, with more than one psychiatric diagnosis and personality disorder; and tended to have more crises and pose greater risk to themselves and others. Compared with 'dual diagnosed' addictions patients they were less involved with drugs, at less risk of abuse by others and less often acknowledged dual problems.

Journal article

American juvenile justice: recent trends and issues in youth offending

Authors:
JENSON Jeffrey M., POTTER Cathryn C., HOWARD Matthew O.
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 35(1), March 2001, pp.48-68.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Reviews trends in juvenile offending in the United States since the 1970s. Examines serious youth violence, co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems among offenders, female delinquency, and other issues currently confronting the American juvenile justice system.

Book

Children and adolescents who try to harm, hurt or kill themselves: a report of further analysis from the national survey of mental health of children and adolescents in Greta Britain in 1999

Authors:
MELTZER Howard, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office for National Statistics
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
70p.
Place of publication:
Newport

The main aim of this report is to present prevalence rates of self-harm among children and adolescents aged 5-15 in England, Scotland and Wales during the first half of 1999. The way the questions were phrased means that it is difficult to distinguish between self-harm with the intention of committing suicide and self-harm without that intention, i.e. self-mutilation. Therefore, most of the analysis in this report is presented by source and covers any attempt by children to harm, hurt or kill themselves. Information was collected on 83% of the 12,529 children eligible for interview from up to three sources resulting in at least some data for 10,438 children and adolescents aged 5-15 in Great Britain. According to parents, approximately 1.3% of 5-10 year olds had ever tried to harm, hurt or kill themselves. The lowest rate, 0.4% was found among 5-7 year old girls rising to 2.1% of 8-10 year old boys.The rate of self harm among the sample of young children with no mental disorder was 0.8%. The rate increased dramatically to 6.2% of children diagnosed as having an anxiety disorder and 7.5% of those who had a conduct disorder, hyperkinetic disorder or a less common mental disorder.

Book

Psychiatric morbidity among adults living in private households, 2000

Authors:
SINGLETON Nicola, et al
Publisher:
Stationery Office/Great Britain. Office for National Statistics
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
154p.
Place of publication:
London

Survey of psychiatric morbidity in Great Britain. Looks at: prevalence; social disabilities associated with mental health problems; use of services; the effects of recent stressful life events; and lifestyle indicators (including drug and alcohol misuse). Surveys people aged from 16-64.

Journal article

Changing places: men replace women in mental health beds in Britain

Authors:
PRIOR Pauline, HAYES Bernadette C.
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 35(4), September 2001, pp.397-410.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Based on census materials collected in England and Wales from 1921 to 1991, this study focuses on gender differences in occupancy rates in hospitals and other mental health facilities in Britain. The results suggest that since 1991, or for the first time in the twentieth century, there are more males than females in residential mental health facilities in Britain. Furthermore, this pattern of association holds for all age groups except those aged 65 years and over. Second, there are currently two distinct subpopulations in mental health facilities - a male group which is predominantly of working age, and a female group, which is predominantly of retirement age. The existence of these two 'care' populations will impact significantly on current and future resourcing of mental health services. The policy implications of the research findings are discussed within the context of the debates on the changing relationship between gender and mental health.

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