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At home?: a study of mental health issues arising in social housing

Author:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR MENTAL HEALTH IN ENGLAND
Publisher:
National Institute for Mental Health in England
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
88p.
Place of publication:
Leeds

This report, based on original survey fieldwork, is intended to gather and express the views and experiences of housing staff on the challenges of working with individuals with mental health problems, and on what they would see as good practice in this field.  It builds upon, up-dates and extends a study conducted in the mid-1990s in a similar and neighbouring area . In addition, where there is a need and a desire for change – and it is clear from the findings so far that there is both – we need to appreciate better what the drivers for change might be, and what the restrictions or inhibiting factors.  This is best done at a local level.  This report will need to be followed by local dialogue between agencies to discuss the issues raised in their local context, and to consider the recommendations that follow.

Journal article

The role of the mental health support time recovery worker

Author:
MORRIS Tania
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 15.08.06, 2006, pp.23-24.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

In the NHS new ways of working that aim to improve care for service users, address staff shortages and increase job satisfaction are continually being created, piloted and introduced in phases. This article examines the role of the support time recovery worker in adult mental health.

Journal article

Service under Scrutiny

Author:
HALLY Helen
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 7.2.96, 1996, p.57.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

The author, a member of several recent mental health inquiry teams, raises key concerns about the inquiry process.

Journal article

Understanding quality of life: a comparison between staff and patients

Authors:
MISSENDEN Kirstie, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work and Social Sciences Review, 6(2), 1995, pp.117-129.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

Reports on a study comparing the quality of life (QOL) of a mental health staff group and a group of patients with diagnoses of psychotic illness. The measures used were the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile (LQOLP), the Life Experiences Checklist (LEC) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Between group comparisons indicated substantial differences in objective QOL but few differences in satisfaction with various life domains. There were also no significant differences in measures of global well-being. Some possible implications of these results for the use of global well-being as an outcome measure are discussed. The potential importance of cognitive processes in the rating QOL is also highlighted.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health toolkit for employers

Author:
BUSINESS IN THE COMMUNITY
Publisher:
Business in the Community
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
68
Place of publication:
London

A toolkit on how to tackle mental ill health and promote wellbeing in the workplace. Mental health is an integral part of how people feel about their jobs, how well they perform and how well they interact with colleagues, customers and clients. With 1 in 6 employees currently experiencing mental health problems, mental health is an essential business concern. This resource sets out a step by step action plan, focusing on: making a commitment; building an approach through workplace policies and plans; promoting a positive culture; providing support and training; managing mental health and ending stigma; providing the right support; helping people recover; and regularly evaluating the organisation’s approach to mental health. The toolkit includes a number of case studies providing examples of good practice. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The perspectives of people who use mental health services engaging with arts and cultural activities

Authors:
JENSEN Anita, STICKLEY Theodore, EDGLEY Alison
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 20(3), 2016, pp.180-186.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a study of arts engagement for mental health service users in Denmark. Design/methodology/approach: The study was completed at Hans Knudsen Instituttet, Denmark. It involved analysis of emerging themes from semi-structured interviews with six participants who had participated in a structured visit to the National Gallery (Statens Museum for Kunst) in Denmark. Findings: Multiple benefits for people who use mental health services engaging in arts activities are reported. Arts activities are described as a central component of everyday life; a way of life and a significant factor in getting through the day. Barriers are identified in the interdisciplinary working between the museum educator and participants. Social implications: This study identifies that the participants benefited from taking part in the arts/cultural activity. Findings also suggest that if museums are offering activities to people who use mental health services they should equip staff with training designed to support appropriate ways of working with this group. This interdisciplinary activity offers a relatively untapped potential arena of support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Librarian or counsellor?: a pilot study of the experiences of library staff in one healthy reading scheme in Ireland

Author:
NEVILLE Patricia
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 23(1), 2014, pp.15-19.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Book prescription schemes and healthy reading schemes place self-help books in public libraries to assist in the treatment of mild to moderate mental illness. Research has highlighted that library staff play an active role in the success of this initiative. Aims: To conduct a pilot study of the professional experiences of the library staff of Clare County Healthy Reading scheme as they deal with the therapeutic demands of the reading public. Method: A preliminary questionnaire was developed and distributed among the staff members. In total, 12 completed questionnaires were returned and analysed. Result: Despite their lack of training and support from statutory mental health services, library staff affirmed their belief in the benefits of healthy reading schemes. Library staff also maintained a clear understanding of their role as gatekeepers but not as therapeutic advisors to the reading public. Conclusion: Despite the serious restrictions to mental health services in Clare, library staff did not believe that their role was to ‘fill in the gap’ in terms of providing mental health assistance to the reading public. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Organisational impact of a forensic education programme

Authors:
WALKER Helen, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Forensic Practice, 15(3), 2013, pp.218-230.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the organisational impact of the New to Forensic Mental Health education programme, developed for use across all forensic services in Scotland. To date, 267 have been trained as a trainer or mentor; 502 have completed the programme and 375 are yet to complete. The programme is designed to promote self-directed learning and is multi-disciplinary and multi-agency in approach. It includes case studies and problem-based learning relating to patients in a variety of settings, from the community to high secure care. Design/methodology/approach: As part of a larger longitudinal study to assess the value of this New to Forensic Mental Health education programme, organisational impact was assessed using semi-structured interviews with (n=13) senior staff working in forensic services. Participants were purposively selected for interview. Findings: Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis, which revealed three themes: “Acquiring knowledge: what you learn and how you learn”, “Developing skills” and “Shift in attitudes and behaviour”. The results demonstrate the positive impact the programme has had at an organisational level and what changes can occur when staff become more knowledgeable, skilful and confident. The implications for practice, along with the limitations of the study, are discussed. One of the weaknesses of this type of analysis is that it is always dependent on the analyst's interpretation, and is thus the product of that person's bias, filters or prejudices. Originality/value: This evaluation is one of the limited few that explore organisational impact of an education programme. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Something to declare? The disclosure of common mental health problems at work

Author:
IRVINE Annie
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 26(2), March 2011, pp.179-192.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

With a focus on mental health and the workplace, this article presents research findings highlighting the complexities involved in individual decision-making and experiences about whether and how to inform employers and others in the workplace about mental health problems such as stress, anxiety and depression. It is based on 2 studies about people's experiences of mental health and employment (one of incapacity benefits recipients and the other of individuals who had sustained employment throughout periods of mental ill health). Using examples from the study data, it discusses how the complex nature of mental health can complicate workplace disclosure, such as where individuals expressed difficulties in the workplace or in their personal life rather than a mental health problem and where individuals delayed disclosure because they did not perceive their experience to be a mental health problem. The author notes that for many people in the mental health and employment studies described, the starting point of their experience was not one of illness or disability, but of sadness, stress or worry.

Journal article

Low security: patient characteristics which lead to an offer of admission and staff perceptions in a unit for people with intellectual disability

Author:
YACOUB Evan
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 4(4), December 2010, pp.25-34.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper focuses on the characteristics of patients with intellectual disabilities offered an admission to a low secure intellectual disability unit, and staff views of low security settings for people with intellectual disabilities. The project was based at a low secure NHS unit for people with intellectual disabilities which accepts referrals from regions within the M25. A case-controlled study was carried out for 33 patients referred to the unit over 42 months. The characteristics of 18 patients offered an admission were compared with those of 15 patients not offered an admission. In addition, 5 of the staff working on the unit were interviewed about the concept of low security. The findings showed that patients offered an admission were more able than those not offered an admission, posed more risks and were more complex diagnostically. Staff working on the unit agreed that their patients were complex, but felt that they were appropriately placed overall. The challenges of low secure provision were discussed by staff. Patients sampled were complex and heterogeneous, but not necessarily ‘forensic’, and their complexity requires sophisticated care plans and management strategies.

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