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Book

Social work and mental disorder: a practical guide for social workers

Author:
BEECH David
Publisher:
Pepar
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
112p., diags, bibliog.
Place of publication:
Birmingham
Book Full text available online for free

Think ahead: social work poll

Author:
COMRES
Publisher:
ComRes
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

Reports on the results of an online survey of 2,033 of British adults which asked about the role of social workers in providing support for people with mental health problems. The survey also asked about the type of support people thought social workers could provide for people with severe mental health problems and professionals involved in deciding whether someone could be detained under the Mental Health Act. Results included that only 41 per cent of those surveyed thought of social workers as important providers of mental health support, whereas 69 per cent identified psychiatrists and 65 per cent identified GPs. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Understanding depression from different paradigms: toward an eclectic social work approach

Authors:
HUANG Yu-Te, FANG Lin
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 46(3), 2016, pp.756-772.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Depression is a significant mental health issue that many social workers encounter in their practice. There is great deal of theoretical and empirical knowledge concerning depression that stems from different paradigms. In this paper, the authors argue for the importance of understanding depression from four paradigms, post-positivism, social constructivism, critical theory and Eastern paradigm, and they illuminate how depression would be known and dealt with by these paradigmatic approaches. Given multiple paradigms available in understanding depression, the authors argue that social workers need to have the ability to appreciate and discern these different paradigms. Such ability can help strengthen social work practice. The authors further illustrate an eclectic approach that not only allows social workers to recognise the utilities and limitations of different paradigms, but also enables them to be dynamic, effectively addressing a range of issues when working with a service user who has depression. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

In the hyphen: perceptions, benefits, and challenges of social workers’ dual identity as clinician-client

Author:
PROBST Barbara
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 95(1), 2014, pp.25-33.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

This study is the first to directly inquire into the experience of clinical social workers who live “in the hyphen,” having received psychiatric diagnoses and/or been in therapy themselves. Rather than inhabiting these roles sequentially as previous studies suggest, many inhabit them simultaneously. Social workers who took part in this qualitative thematic analysis describe the benefits of living in the hyphen, such as greater understanding of client resistance and opportunity to serve as a model of realistic hope, as well as its challenges, including countertransference, retraumatization, and fear of being “outed.” Overall, the experience of “sitting in the other chair” was more important to participants than having a skillful therapist as a role model or sharing a specific diagnostic history with a client, which they cautioned did not offer a shortcut to authentic understanding or formation of a therapeutic alliance (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Reinventing the employable citizen: a perspective for social work

Authors:
ROETS Griet, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 42(1), 2012, pp.94-110.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Modern economies try to employ economically inactive individuals, such as people with chronic mental health problems, through a wide range of strategies. This article, based on a project in Flanders, Belgium, in which social workers are charged with managing labour market training programmes, explores the support elements available for people with mental health problems. It aims to transfer the Belgian experience to the British context in an analysis of the various notions and interpretations of citizenship in social practices. In the analysis, the authors differentiate between notions and experiences of normative and relational citizenship. They argue that a relational approach to citizenship enables social workers in Belgium to make use of their discretionary space to negotiate employment trajectories in a flexible way. In conclusion, social workers are in a critical position to influence social policy makers.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The reader scoops a top award

Author:
SALE Anabel Unity
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 2.4.09, 2009, p.20.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Social worker Janice Hutton describes how she received a Reading Hero award from Reading for Life, for her work with young people who have mental health problems.

Journal article Full text available online for free

A traumatic life brought to book

Author:
SALE Anabel Unity
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 25.9.08, 2008, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Social worker Philip Hill's life story was so extraordinary that his psychiatrist urged him to complete his autobiography.  The book details his story from being taken into care, being misdiagnosed as having learning disabilities as a child and experiencing two breakdowns and paranoid schizophrenia, to becoming a social worker. In this article Philip talks to the author about his experiences.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The role of social work in mental health services

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 17.7.08, 2008, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

This article discusses the role of social workers in co-ordinating and delivering services for people with mental health problems.

Journal article

Stress and pressures in mental health social work: the worker speaks

Authors:
HUXLEY Peter, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 35(7), October 2005, pp.1063-1079.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Two-thirds of councils with social services responsibilities (CSSRs) took part in a UK survey of mental health social workers. A one in five sample of front line workers was drawn, and 237 respondents completed a questionnaire and diary about their work context and content, and their attitudes to their work, their employer, mental health policy and the place of mental health social work in modernized mental health services. The questions, that called for free-text responses, were completed in detail and at length. This paper reports the results of a qualitative analysis of these responses using NVIVO software. The paper is structured around the themes emerging from the analysis: pressure of work; staffing matters; job satisfaction and well-being; recruitment and retention issues; and being valued. The conclusions are that the social workers value face to face contact with service users, and that their commitment to service users is an important factor in staff retention. The most unsatisfactory aspects of their work context arise from not feeling valued by their employers and wider society, and some of the most satisfactory from the support of colleagues and supervisors. Without attention to these factors, recruitment and retention problems will remain an unresolved issue.

Journal article

Social workers' views of the etiology of mental disorders: results of a national study

Authors:
WALSH Joseph, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 50(1), January 2005, pp.43-52.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Research on many mental disorders since the 1990s strongly suggests a biological component to etiology. These developments should inform the decisions clinical social workers make regarding interventions with clients. Several recent research reports have suggested that social workers may underestimate the influence of biological factors in some mental disorders. Presents the results of a US national study of social workers in which disorder-specific measures of mental illness were used to determine more clearly whether social workers are making research-based assessments of mental illness etiology. It was found that social workers attribute causality of 4 disorders in a manner consistent with current research.

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