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Book

Mental health

Author:
WEINSTEIN Jeremy
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
76
Place of publication:
Bristol

Mental health social work is at an impasse. On the one hand, the emphasis in recent policy documents on the social roots of much mental distress ,and in the recovery approaches popular with service users seems to indicate an important role for a holistic social work practice. On the other hand, social workers have often been excluded from these initiatives and the dominant approach within mental health continues to be a medical one, albeit supplemented by short-term psychological interventions. Jeremy Weinstein draws on case studies and his own experience as a mental health social worker, to develop a model of practice that draws on notions of alienation, anti-discriminatory practice and the need for both workers and service users to find ‘room to breathe’ in an environment shaped by managerialism and marketization. Academics and student social workers respond to Weinstein’s lead essay. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A case for psychodynamic social work

Author:
BULL G.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community, 4(3/4), 1990, pp.96-106.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Argues that the psychodynamic approach has some unique advantages in work with people with severe psychiatric problems.

Journal article

The new alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders: issues and controversies

Author:
PORTER Jeffrey S.
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 24(1), 2014, pp.50-56.
Publisher:
Sage

Purpose: Assess the new alternative Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5) model for personality disorders (PDs) as it is seen by its creators and critics. Method: Follow the DSM revision process by monitoring the American Psychiatric Association website and the publication of pertinent journal articles. Results: The DSM-5 PD Work Group’s proposal was not included in the main diagnostic section of the new DSM, but it was published in the section devoted to emerging models. The alternative DSM-5 PD constructs are radically different from those found in DSM, fourth edition, text revision. Discussion: There are some positive conceptual changes in the new model, but reliability and validity are not generally improved. However, social workers may be able to benefit from the use of the personality trait domains/facets of the alternative model. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social work and a social model of madness and distress: developing a viable role for the future

Author:
BERESFORD Peter
Journal article citation:
Social Work and Social Sciences Review, 12(2), 2005, pp.48-58.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

This article explores the social model in relation to 'mental health' policy and practice generally and social work specifically. It highlights the continuing dominance of bio-medical approaches to and interpretations of 'mental health'; examines the development and nature of mainstream social approaches and considers mental health service users' own discussions of a social model of madness and distress. The article looks at the ramifications for social work which is based on a social model of madness and distress; what it might look like and what infrastructural supports it is likely to require to develop effectively.

Book

Social work in mental health: an evidence-based approach

Editors:
THYER Bruce A., WODARSKI John S., (eds.)
Publisher:
John Wiley and Sons
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
592p.
Place of publication:
Chichester

Guide to the delivery of evidence-based care. Covering a wide spectrum of mental health disorders, the editors have brought together noted experts to provide the most current, empirically supported techniques in the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders as classified by the DSM-IV-TR. Examples of evidence-based interventions guide the reader through the process and provide insight into the philosophy as well as the scientific basis underlying each technique and intervention presented. Chapters begin with learning objectives that alert you to the main ideas covered and conclude with provocative study questions that are designed to test your understanding while providing an opportunity for review and reinforcement of the key concepts covered.

Journal article

Supported education for adults with psychiatric disabilities: an innovation for social work and psychosocial rehabilitation practice

Authors:
MOWBRAY Carol T., et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 50(1), January 2005, pp.7-20.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Discusses supported education (SEd), one of the newest pyschosocial rehabilitation (PSR) models for adults with mental illness. Its mission, principles and service components are presented, reflecting its basis in PSR practice. Evidence of the effectiveness of supported education based on research and evaluation studies is provided. Concludes with a discussion of why PSR and SEd are important to social work and how social workers can effectively use this evidence-based practice to maximise opportunities for consumers with a mental illness.

Journal article

Socialpsykiatri - en ny mde at se socialt arbejde p! (Social psychiatry - a new way to view social work!)

Author:
ANDERSEN Carsten
Journal article citation:
Nordisk Sosialt Arbeid, 14(2), 1994, pp.131-143.
Publisher:
Universitetsforlaget AS

In all the Nordic countries there has been a development in the field of psychiatry, away from the large treatment institutions towards locally and socially based psychiatric work. In the individual Nordic countries this work is organised in different ways. In Denmark the development of the psychiatric organisation has tried to get away from centralized institutional psychiatry towards a more decentralized district psychiatry and social psychiatry. The expression 'social psychiatry' is often accused of mixing medical psychiatric treatment with social interventions or suggesting that social work can also be a form of psychiatric treatment. Social work is social work and social care directed towards people with mental disorders. This work is based on specialised psychiatric knowledge and basis social methods and concepts.

Journal article

The approved social worker - reflections on origins

Author:
PRIOR Pauline M.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 22(2), 1992, pp.105-119.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Discusses the contradictions inherent in the role of the ASW and argues that the provisions of the Mental Health Act and the lack of community resources have impeded the development of advocacy as part of the social work role.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Personality disorder: the limits to intervention

Author:
BURTON A.
Journal article citation:
Practice: Social Work in Action, 4(4), 1990, pp.221-228.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Examines the theoretical knowledge about personality disorder; reports a case history and two different social work approaches to the client's problems.

Journal article

On being unreasonable in modern society: are mental health problems special?

Authors:
PILGRIMA David, TOMASINI Floris
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(5), August 2012, pp.631-646.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Conceptually, both medicine and social science have struggled to find a consensus of understanding about madness and misery, leaving mental health and mental ill health as highly contested topics. There are many grounds for arguing that people with a range of disabilities have more in common than they have differences. However, those grounds to date have not resulted in a unified social movement. This paper examines one possible reason for that lack of unity: the particular force of being unreasonable in modern society. However, being unreasonable is not limited to those with a psychiatric diagnosis, nor does a lack or loss of reason take a simple common form within that group: it is a highly nuanced and context-specific matter. This complexity is discussed in relation to a set of inter-related questions about legalism, morality and post-enlightenment concerns with order and rationality. The paper concludes with a discussion of scenarios available to new social movements concerned with disability.

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