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Journal article

Social exclusion and mental health - how people with mental health problems are disadvantaged: an overview

Author:
BOARDMAN Jed
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 15(3), 2011, pp.112-121.
Publisher:
Emerald

Social exclusion is a major problem in the UK. Evidence shows that those with mental health problems or learning disabilities are excluded from participation in many areas of society. This article provides an overview of aspects of social exclusion, and the way in which certain groups are excluded from mainstream society. It summarises the main findings of the work of the Royal College of Psychiatrists Scoping Group on Social Exclusion and Mental Health. The article suggests that a person is socially excluded if they do not participate in key activities of the society in which he or she lives. People with mental health problems, particularly those with long-term psychoses, are among the most excluded groups. They may be excluded from material resources and living in relative poverty, excluded from socially valued productive activity, excluded from social relations and neighbourhoods, and also excluded from civic participation and health and health services.

Journal article

Patterns of exclusion of carers for people with mental health problems - the perspectives of professionals

Authors:
GRAY Benjamin, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community, 24(4), December 2010, pp.475-492.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The UK government 10 year strategy for carers (Carers at the Heart of 21st Century Families and Communities, 2008) outlines commitment to support for carers, to enable them to be included within service provision and to have a 'life of their own' including income, employment and well-being, helping to prevent social exclusion. In this study, 65 strategic staff in mental health care delivery from a range of settings and sectors were interviewed and invited to comment on the social exclusion of carers. The findings highlight four main types of exclusion: personal exclusions (including stigma and keeping mental health problems a secret), social exclusions (including isolation, commitments and restrictions and young carers), service exclusions (including needs not being addressed and difficulties with access), and financial exclusions (including paying for care). The author discusses the patterns of exclusion and considers the ways in which professionals and services can promote the social inclusion of carers for people with mental health problems in future.

Journal article

Mental health disparities research: the impact of within and between group analyses on tests of social stress hypotheses

Authors:
SCHWARTZ Sharon, MEYER Ilan H.
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 70(8), April 2010, pp.1111-1118.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Social stress models are the predominant theoretical frame for studies of the relationship between social factors and mental health, and propose that prejudice, discrimination and related social ills add a unique source of stress that may explain how socially disadvantaged populations produce mental health problems. Noting that researchers have used a variety of methodological approaches to study this hypothesis, the authors of this paper argue that there are disconcerting inconsistencies in research findings that have not been sufficiently considered, particularly the distinction between studies of within group and studies of between groups variation. The article covers the premises of social stress theory, empirical findings in studies of social stress, and divergence in sources of evidence, with discussion of the inference for social stress as a cause of mental disorders.

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Digital exclusion profiling of vulnerable groups: adults with mental health problems: a profile

Authors:
CITIZENS ONLINE, NATIONAL CENTRE FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Communities and Local Government
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
58p.
Place of publication:
London

This profile considers adults with mental health problems. It aims to understand group members' actual and potential interaction with technology. The starting point of the profile is to understand the life circumstances of group members through desk-based research. Our understanding of group members' (potential) engagement with technology has been developed largely through primary research. In particular, focus groups were set up with group members and professionals working with the group. Detailed findings from the primary research as well as further background to this profile are available from the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Journal article

Challenges in multidisciplinary systematic reviewing: a study on social exclusion and mental health policy

Authors:
CURRAN Claire, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 41(3), June 2007, pp.289-312.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

In the clinical sciences, systematic reviews have proved useful in the aggregation of diverse sources of evidence. They identify, characterize and summate evidence, but these methodologies have not always proved suitable for the social sciences. The authors discuss some of the practical problems faced by researchers undertaking reviews of complex and cross-disciplinary topics, using the example of mental health and social exclusion. The barriers to carrying out social science and cross-disciplinary reviews are reported and some proposals for overcoming these barriers are made, not all of them tried and tested, and some of them controversial. Using a mapping approach, a wide-ranging search of both clinical and social science databases was undertaken and a large volume of references was identified and characterized. Population sampling techniques were used to manage these references. The challenges encountered include: inconsistent definitions of social phenomena, differing use of key concepts across research fields and practical problems relating to database compatibility and computer processing power. The challenges and opportunities for social scientists or multidisciplinary research teams carrying out reviews are discussed. Literature mapping and systematic reviews are useful tools but methods need to be tailored to optimize their usefulness in the social sciences.

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National programme for improving mental health and well-being small research projects initiative 2006-07: restart for recovery

Authors:
BAILEY Pegs, MYERS Fiona, COUTTS Pippa
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Restart is an Edinburgh-based employability project that aims to promote recovery for people with mental health problems through supporting them into work. It is managed by Forth Sector and works in partnership with NHS Lothian and others. The evaluation used a qualitative methodology to assess the impact the project has had on people’s employability, recovery and levels of social inclusion. It interviewed a total of 17 service users and 4 service providers over a period of 3 months.

Journal article

Mental health and higher education: mapping field, consciousness and legitimation

Authors:
BAKER Sally, BROWN B. J., FAZEY John A.
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 26(1), February 2006, pp.31-56.
Publisher:
Sage

Some UK academics have declared that they do not want higher education to become part of the social welfare system. In this article the authors review aspects of policy and practice that suggest that this has already happened. Explicit encouragement of people with mental health problems to undertake courses has proceeded alongside a number of initiatives to make higher education institutions better able to support students in difficulty, and new responsibilities are being unfolded for the staff. There is growing evidence that students’ mental health problems are increasing. To make sense of the transformations in the topography of policy and in the consciousness it encourages, we make use of theoretical frameworks such as Bourdieu's notion of field and the generative work of Foucault and Rose, to examine the implications this has for the conceptualization of politics under New Labour and the implications this has for a newly recapitalized notion of responsible individuals.

Journal article

An adventure into the unknown: creating employment opportunities in eastern Europe

Author:
LUCAS Jo
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 9(2), May 2005, pp.12-17.
Publisher:
Emerald

Describes how non-government organisations are establishing community based employment initiatives in eastern Europe, creating opportunities for people with mental health problems. Looks at the challenges they face as they seek to establish financial self-sufficiency while not loosing their social support functions.

Journal article

An idea whose time has come?: mental health, social inclusion and housing

Author:
JOHNSON Robin
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 8(1), February 2005, pp.24-28.
Publisher:
Emerald

The Social Exclusion Unit (SEU) report on mental health published in summer 2004 had surprisingly little to say about housing. But behind the scenes there has been a ferment of activity and the National Institute for Mental Health for England (NIMHE) has been given the lead role in advancing all central government efforts to create a more joined-up vision of mental health for the 21st century. NIMHE has taken the lead in implementation of the SEU's conclusions and much more besides. A National Project Team on mental health and housing is to come together next year, with a wide-ranging brief. This article looks at some of the issues this new body will take on, including a new focus on research on the links between poor mental health and poor housing, and an evaluation of 'housing-based solutions'. As NIMHE itself is absorbed from April 2005 into the new Care Services Improvement Partnership, the prospects for linking housing with the community care modernisation agenda must be looking up.

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Count me in: making life better for people with mental health problems: an easy read version of the Social Exclusion Unit report

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
London

An easy to read version of the Social Exclusion Unit’s report on mental health. It was put together with the help of Mencap and outlines in easy to understand language what the report is about, explains some of the key terms such as ‘social exclusion’ and sets out some of the main action points from the report.

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