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Journal article

Complex causes

Author:
FERRY Richard
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 19.1.94, 1994, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Sheds light on the perplexing nature of self-injurious behaviours by offering a method of classifying them according to their origins.

Book Full text available online for free

The truth about self-harm for young people and their friends and families

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
35
Place of publication:
London

This booklet provides accessible information and advice on self-harm. Self-harm describes any behaviour where someone causes harm to themselves, usually as a way to help cope with difficult or distressing thoughts and feelings. It most frequently takes the form of cutting, burning or nonlethal overdoses. However, it can also be any behaviour that causes injury – no matter how minor, or high-risk behaviours. This resource explains how to get help, the recovery process, how to keep safe, and what to do, and look out for, if worried that someone may be self-harming. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

No harm done: recognising and responding to self-harm. Next steps for staff working with young people

Authors:
YOUNGMINDS, ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS, CHARLIE WALLER MEMORIAL TRUST
Publisher:
YoungMinds
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Provides simple guidance to help professionals support young people who are self-harming. Self-harm describes any way in which a young person might harm themselves or put themselves at risk in order to cope with difficult thoughts, feelings or experiences. It affects up to 1 in 5 young people and spans the divides of gender, class, age and ethnicity. The document examines: how to recognise the self-harm warning signs; how to hold the first conversation; what to do when a young person is not ready to talk; what to do when there are concerns about a young person's immediate safety; how to provide practical support; and how to provide support within the context of a whole school approach. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Vulnerabilities to deliberate self-harm among adolescents: the role of alexithymia and victimization

Authors:
GARISCH Jessica Anne, WILSON Marc Stewart
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 49(2), June 2010, pp.151-162.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Using a sample of 325 students aged between 16 and 23 years from a secondary school in Wellington, New Zealand, this study investigated vulnerabilities to deliberate self-harm among adolescents, specifically focusing on peer victimisation and alexithymia (described as a clinical construct referring to poor ability to identify and describe emotions, and poor interoceptive awareness), in order to better identify at-risk adolescents and their needs. The students completed self-report questionnaires about their history of deliberate self-harm and bullying, with a self-rating depression scale, and alexithymia measured using the self-report Toronto Alexithymia scale. The results showed that self-harming adolescents reported more victimisation and alexithymia symptomology than those who had never engaged in deliberate self harm. The researchers concluded that the findings suggest that stressors in the social environment such as bullying are more likely to facilitate deliberate self harm when an adolescent has poor emotion regulation and communication skills and when an individual is experiencing mood difficulties, and that the area of deliberate self-harm and emotional functioning requires extensive future research including longitudinal studies investigating the vulnerabilities created by victimisation and alexithymia.

Journal article

Co-occurrence of self-reported disordered eating and self-harm in UK university students

Authors:
WRIGHT Fiona, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 48(4), November 2009, pp.397-410.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The authors state that students are reported to have more symptoms of mental health problems than other young people. Their study aimed to examine disordered eating and self-harm, looking at their co-occurrence, onset timing and the help-seeking of UK university students. Surveys including questions about disordered eating, self-harm thoughts and behaviours, and psychological well-being were administered to undergraduate students at the University of Leeds. The study found that there was a strong relationship between reports of disordered eating and self-harm, that these often predated university entrance, that a younger age of onset of disordered eating behaviours was reported in those with co-occurring disordered eating and self-harm, and that help-seeking rates were low.

Book Full text available online for free

Understanding self-harm

Authors:
CSIPKE Emese, et al
Publisher:
SANE
Publication year:
2008
Place of publication:
London

Non-accidental self-harm without suicidal intent by cutting, scratching or burning the skin and other tissue, by taking overdoses of prescription and over-the-counter medications, by bruising, by ingesting harmful substances or objects and by other methods is finally being discussed in the media and researched by academics. Little by little, its meanings and functions are uncovered in writings by survivors and reports based on clinical experience and academic studies. SANE wanted to add to this research effort and in 2005 a web based questionnaire was launchedcharting the journey from first acts of self-harm through to the time when self-harm can be left behind, with a special focus on the social context in which self-harm takes place. This report is intended as a source of information and most importantly, a discussion point for people who self-harm, their families, treatment professionals who work with people who self-harm and research professionals and students who work on the subject.

Journal article

We don't do suicide watch

Author:
JAMES Adam
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 129, September 2004, p.24.
Publisher:
MIND

Profiles the Acorn programme, a ward for 12 self-harming clients at the Retreat, the therapeutic community near York. Staff aim to create 'treatment alliances', facilitating clients to take responsibility for their behaviour. There is no suicide watch, clients are expected to dress their own self-harm wounds, and if they storm out threatening to injure themselves nurses will not rush in pursuit. They are encouraged to take collective responsibility for each other, and emergency community meetings decide what to do if a client is judged to be at risk from self-harm.

Journal article

Where's the harm in it?

Author:
GEORGE Mike
Journal article citation:
Care and Health Magazine, 57, 2004, pp.42-43.
Publisher:
Care and Health

Reviews the facts behind self harm.

Journal article Full text available online for free

ABC of mental health: common mental health problems in hospital

Authors:
RAMIREZ Amanda, HOUSE Allan
Journal article citation:
British Medical Journal, 7.6.97, 1997, pp.1679-1681.
Publisher:
British Medical Association

Discusses the three main types of mental health problems of patients attending acute general hospitals. Acute primary psychiatric disorder, including deliberate self harm; psychiatric disorder in patients with physical illness; and psychologically based physical syndromes (somatisation).

Journal article

Specialist needs

Authors:
CHILDS Adrian, et al
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 19.1.94, 1994, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Considers the role of nurses in the supervision of potentially self-injuring patients, based on experiences at the Maudsley Hospital in London.

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