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Journal article Full text available online for free

Predictors of later schizophrenia and affective psychosis among attendees at a child psychiatry department

Authors:
CANNON Mary, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 178, May 2001, pp.420-426.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Schizophrenia has been linked with psychological problems in childhood but there is little information on precursors of affective psychosis. Childhood item sheets, which give standardised information on signs and symptoms of mental illness in the year preceding assessment are completed for all attendees at the children's department of the Maudsley and Bethlem Royal Hospital. The authors examined item sheet data on individuals with an adult diagnosis of schizophrenia or affective psychosis and a comparison group with no adult mental illness. Finds that abnormal suspiciousness or sensitivity and relationship difficulties with peers are associated with later schizophrenia. In contrast, affective psychosis is associated with childhood hysterical symptoms and disturbances in eating. Concludes that childhood psychological precursors for schizophrenia and affective psychosis differ and do not simply reflect non-specific psychiatric disturbance in adolescence.

Book

Hearing voices: embodiment and experience

Author:
BLACKMAN Lisa
Publisher:
Free Association Books
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
275p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The hearing of voices is generally regarded as indicative of mental health problems, yet there is evidence to suggest that hearing voices is far more common than believed, that many voice hearers are not suffering from mental illness, and that those who develop non psychiatric explanations of their voices may live with them quite well. This book, drawing on the experiences of the Hearing Voices Network, challenges commonly accepted perceptions of mental health and questions how it is that we come to experience and relate to ourselves as autonomous, rational human beings. The book draws on critical psychology, post structuralism, discourse theory and work on embodiment for many of its insights.

Journal article

Quality of life in boarding houses and hostels: a residents' perspective

Authors:
HORAN Matthew E., et al
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 37(4), August 2001, pp.323-334.
Publisher:
Springer

In the last forty years deinstitutionalisation has transferred the care of people with a serious mental illness from the psychiatric hospitals to community based facilities. More recently it has been questioned whether these new facilities offer the anticipated benefits of quality of life. This study examines the Quality of Life (QOL) of people diagnosed with schizophrenia living in two different accommodation facilities, hostels and boarding houses in Australia. QOL is examines from the resident's perspective. Lehmans' (1988b) QOL interview was used to measure objective, subjective, and global QOL of 60 participants in three hostels and two boarding house clusters. Hostel and boarding house data were compared and results showed that residents preferred boarding house accommodation. Overall, residents of both accommodation facilities reported satisfaction with QOL, and indicated that they regard them as asylum or sanctuary from the outside world.

Journal article

Communicating effectively with psychotic patients

Author:
JOHNSTON John
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 20.9.01, 2001, pp.36-37.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Argues that nurses need to develop a feel for the hidden meaning of words if they are to have constructive conversations with people whose talk is often dismissed.

Journal article

The effects of cognitive impairment and substance abuse on psychiatric hospitalisations

Authors:
JACKSON Carlos T., et al
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 37(4), August 2001, pp.303-312.
Publisher:
Springer

Previous studies have demonstrated a relationship between impairment in executive functioning and hospital and community tenure for people with schizophrenia. However, while it has been clearly established that comorbid substance abuse has a profound negative impact on the functioning of people with schizophrenia, no studies have examined the relative effect of cognitive impairment to substance use in predicting rehospitalisation in this population. This study examined the extent to which impairment on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and substance abuse are correlated with lifetime psychiatric hospitalisations for outpatients with schizophrenia. Substance abuse was significant predictor of prior hospitalisations and impairment on the WCST was a significant predictor of the months hospitalised. The findings suggest that both substance abuse and cognitive impairment need to be addressed in order to reduce hospitalisations and time in the hospital.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Psychiatric effects of cannabis

Author:
JOHNS Andrew
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 178, February 2001, pp.116-122.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Aims To re-evaluate the adverse effects of cannabis in the general population and among vulnerable individuals, including those with serious psychiatric disorders. It was found that an appreciable proportion of cannabis users report short-lived adverse effects, including psychotic states following heavy consumption, and regular users are at risk of dependence. People with major mental illnesses such as schizophrenia are especially vulnerable in that cannabis generally provokes relapse and aggravates existing symptoms. Health workers need to recognise, and respond to, the adverse effects of cannabis on mental health.

Book

Schizophrenia

Authors:
BIRCHWOOD Max, JACKSON Chris
Publisher:
Psychology Press
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
168p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Hove

Schizophrenia continues to be the most debilitating of the psychotic disorders with less than one third returning to a `normal' level of functioning. The understanding of this disorder has advanced considerably over the last 10 years with major contributions from neurobiology but particularly from an understanding of the way in which psychosocial and psychological factors interact with underlying vulnerabilities to influence both the content and timing of psychotic symptoms and the personal and social difficulty they create. This book brings together this disparate and complex literature. The section on treatment brings to the reader a clear account of psychological, social and drug treatments interspersed with clinical accounts.

Book

The day the voices stopped: a memoir of madness and hope

Authors:
STEELE Ken, BERMAN Claire
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
257p.
Place of publication:
New York

Steele died at 51, just after completing this highly personal but clear-headed account of his life as a schizophrenic. His parents' denial of his illness, which struck suddenly when he was 14, hampered them and him in seeking help and in understanding the dangers his condition might entail, and thus his experience of his illness was punctuated by several suicide attempts and violent attacks. There were also a few bright spots - the occasional knowledgeable, sympathetic doctor or positive and educational hospital programme, amid the despair and hopelessness that usually surrounded him. During the 32 years that interior voices overwhelmed his thoughts and actions, Steele moved back and forth across the country and in and out of hospitals and worked at odd jobs, including an unfortunate stint of prostitution. His account of the day the voices stopped will surely remain with everyone who reads it, and the whole book should inform and affect other victims of severe mental illness and their families.

Book

Mind's yellow card for reporting drug side effects: a report of users' experiences

Authors:
COBB Alison, DARTON Katherine, JUTTLA Kiran
Publisher:
MIND
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
40p.
Place of publication:
London

Mind's yellow card scheme is based on the official scheme used by doctors to report adverse drug reactions to the Medicines Control Agency. Mind's own scheme is for people taking psychiatric drugs rather than health professionals. It invites people to report side effects and other aspects of their treatment.

Book

Raising our voices: an account of the hearing voices movement

Author:
JAMES Adam
Publisher:
Handsell
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
178p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Gloucester

This book details the history of the Hearing Voices Network from Julian Jaynes' work on the bicarmal mind to the development of the Network. It includes chapters on: Moses - prophet or schizophrenic; the freedom to hear voices and the beginnings of the hearing voices movement; self help; who or what are the voices; psychotic and proud; cognitive psychology and hearing voices; grooming maverick psychiatrists; advocacy; and the genetics of schizophrenia.

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