Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 267

Journal article Full text available online for free

Subjective and objective dimensions of quality of life in psychiatric patients: a factor analytical approach: The South Verona Outcome Project 4

Authors:
RUGGERI Mirella, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 178, March 2001, pp.268-275.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Explores the role of subjective and objective Quality Of Life dimensions and their cross-sectional and longitudinal predictors. The relationship between QQL, as measured by the Lancashire Quality Of Life Profile (LQL), and demographic variables, diagnosis, psychopathology, disability, functioning, affect balance, self-esteem, service use and service satisfaction was investigated at two points in time, using factor analysis and multiple regression techniques. Concludes that subjective and objective data are distinct types of information. Objective measures may be more suitable in detecting treatment effects. Subjective information is necessary to complete the QQL picture and to enhance the interpretation of objective data.

Journal article

The impact of exercise on the mental health and quality of life of people with severe mental illness: a critical review

Authors:
ALEXANDRATOS Kristy, BARNETT Fiona, THOMAS Yvonne
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 75(2), February 2012, pp.48-60.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

While physical exercise is beneficial in terms of mental health and wellbeing, there has been little research investigating its impact on mental health and quality of life for people who experience a severe mental illness. This review explores the effect of physical exercise on the mental health and quality of life of people with severe mental illness. Data was drawn from 16 articles published between 1998 and 2009. The findings revealed that exercise contributed to improvements in symptoms, including mood, alertness, concentration, sleep patterns and psychotic symptoms. Exercise also improved quality of life through social interaction, meaningful use of time, purposeful activity and empowerment. The authors concluded that future studies should focus on psychological outcome measures to provide greater evidence for its use in therapy.

Journal article

Relationships between physical activity, symptoms and quality of life among inpatients with severe mental illness

Authors:
BONSAKSEN Tore, LERDAL Anners
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 75(2), February 2012, pp.69-75.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

This study explored the relationships between self-reported physical activity, depression, anxiety and quality of life in 18 inpatients with severe mental illness in Norway. Physical activity was measured with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire; anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; and quality of life was measured with the World Health Organization Quality of Life - BREF. Results revealed that patients with more depression and anxiety symptoms reported lower quality of life. There was no relationship between physical activity and quality of life. Findings also confirmed relationships between depression and anxiety scores and lower quality of life. The authors concluded that the findings may be due to participants' severity of illness. Physical activity may be more important to quality of life in better-functioning patients.

Journal article

Psychological well-being in visually impaired and unimpaired individuals: a meta-analysis

Authors:
PINQUART Martin, PIEFFER Jens P.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 29(1), January 2011, pp.27-45.
Publisher:
Sage

It is generally believed that limited vision is negatively associated with psychological well-being (PWB). This meta-analysis integrates the results of 198 studies that compared the PWB of visually impaired individuals with unimpaired control groups or population norms. The authors define PWB in terms of individual internal states, such as being free of mental illness, having high levels of positive emotions, self acceptance, and being satisfied with life. The mean age of the visually impaired respondents was 71.37 years; normally sighted controls were just a little younger. About 62% of the respondents were women. Overall, visually impaired people showed a strong decline of vision-specific psychological well-being. However, declines in vision-unspecific measures were small compared to normally sighted peers. Sampling methods influenced study results. Declines of PWB were greater in studies with convenience samples (compared to probability samples) and in studies that used population norms rather than a control group. PWB was lower in; individuals with greater vision loss and in those with age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy, as compared to glaucoma; in adults as compared to children; and, to some extent, in older studies. The authors discuss their findings in terms of developing and implementing interventions aimed at protecting the PWB of visually impaired individuals.

Journal article

Putting recovery into mental health practice

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, SLADE Mike
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2008, pp.28-31.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

While the concept of recovery requires further development, the author argues that it provides a framework that could bring a radical transformation of mental health services in the UK. This article, based on a longer policy paper produced by the Sainsbury Centre, presents some of the key ideas and their implications for the delivery of mental health services.

Journal article

Comparing quality of life using the World Health Organization Quality of Life measure (WHOQOL-100) in a clinical and non-clinical sample: exploring the role of self-esteem, self-efficacy and social functioning

Authors:
MURPHY Helen, MURPHY Elisa K.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 15(3), June 2006, pp.289-300.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Quality of life assessments provide a measure of client-assessed wellbeing and help clinicians recognize issues of importance to clients. Comparing quality of life in individuals with a mental illness and individuals without mental illness would allow us to profile and understand the needs of individuals with mental illness understand the impact of stigma and narrow the treatment gap. The aim was to compare quality of life in individuals with severe mental illness against a sample of the general population and to investigate the role of self-esteem, self-efficacy and social functioning. The World Health Organization Quality of Life measure (WHOQOL-100) along with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) and the Generalized Self Efficacy Scale (GSES) were administered to 104 individuals, 52 of whom were mental health service users with the remaining 52 participants sampled from the general population. Significant differences were found between clinical and non-clinical groups in four domains of the WHOQOL-100 and in a majority of the facets within domains. Two domains, Level of Independence and Social Relationships, were important differentiating aspects of QoL between the clinical and non-clinical sample as the highest significant differences were recorded there. Lower self-esteem and self-efficacy scores were recorded for the clinical sample compared to the non-clinical sample. The negative repercussions of mental illness encompassed almost all aspects of QoL that individuals had ascertained to be important for satisfaction and wellbeing in everyday life. Findings also indicated that individuals with mental illness have similar needs to a “normal” population in terms of social support and social networks and that inter-personal issues were probably more pervasive than intra-psychic events with regard to QoL. We conclude that the concept of QoL offers clinicians an increased awareness and greater concern for life issues for people who are mentally ill, helping us to develop collaborative relationships and provide effective interventions for individuals with mental illness.

Journal article

Putting users in control

Authors:
HITCHON Gil, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, June 2006, pp.16-18.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The authors, from the charity Together, argue that mental health organisations need to put service users at the heart of everything they do. They argue that recovery, well-being and quality of life, rather than simply the treatment of symptoms, should drive mental health organisations. The article uses a four quadrant/four-views perspective in order to help integrate the key perspectives that influence people's lives.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Patient-rated mental health needs and quality of life improvement

Authors:
SLADE Mike, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 187(3), September 2005, pp.256-261.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Patient-rated unmet need is cross-sectionally associated with quality of life. This study aims to test the hypotheses that: (a) higher patient-rated unmet need is associated with lower individual quality of life assessments by a patient over time; and (b) reduction in patient-rated unmet need precedes improvement in quality of life. One hundred and one individuals using adult mental health services in Croydon, London were asked to complete 6-monthly questionnaires, comprising quality of life (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life, MANSA) and unmet need (Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule, CANSAS) assessments. Seventy-three participants provided 240 separate pairs of consecutive assessments. Random effects regression models indicated an impact on current quality of life for both average level of unmet need and change in unmet need over the past month. The authors conclude that changes in patient-rated unmet needs may cause changes in quality of life.

Book Full text available online for free

Count me in: making life better for people with mental health problems: an easy read version of the Social Exclusion Unit report

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
London

An easy to read version of the Social Exclusion Unit’s report on mental health. It was put together with the help of Mencap and outlines in easy to understand language what the report is about, explains some of the key terms such as ‘social exclusion’ and sets out some of the main action points from the report.

Journal article

The quality of life of HIV-infected women is associated with psychiatric morbidity

Authors:
TOSTES M.A., CHALUB M., BOTEGA N.J.
Journal article citation:
AIDS Care, 16(2), February 2004, pp.177-186.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Evaluates the effect of clinical, demographic and psychiatric factors on the health-related quality of life of 76 women with HIV infection seen in two HIV reference centres in Brazil. The generic questionnaire for evaluation of Health-Related Quality of Life (SF-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) and the Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R) were used. The statistical tests included the covariance analysis. The sub-group of the non-AIDS symptoms (clinical stage B) showed the worst quality of life. The variables which better explained the scoring variation on both the mental and physical components of the SF-36 were related to mental health. The more mental symptoms present, the worse the health-related quality of life. Concludes that care strategies should be rethought in the area of mental health which are directed toward HIV+ patients, by virtue of the levels of mental health symptoms found and the request for care which the research revealed.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts