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Journal

Journal of Psychotherapy in Independent Practice

Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
London

The Journal of Psychotherapy in Independent Practice has been merged/replaced with The Psychotherapy Patient, the Journal of Clinical Activities, Assignments and Handouts in Psychotherapy Practice, and the Journal of Mental Health Intervention after the publication of Volume 2, No. 4. The journal under its new title of the Journal of Adjunctive Therapies in Mental Health begins as Volume 1, No. 1, Spring 2004.

Book

Dynamic psychotherapy explained

Author:
HUGHES Patricia
Publisher:
Radcliffe Medical Press
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
174p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Places psychotherapy in its context in psychiatry and outlines the important theories of dynamic psychotherapy. Uses clinical examples to illustrate theory and practice.

Book Full text available online for free

An evaluation of the 'IPS in IAPT' Psychological Wellbeing and Work Feasibility pilot

Authors:
STEADMAN Karen, THOMAS Rosemary
Publisher:
Work Foundation
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
68
Place of publication:
London

Report on the pilot of a scheme to help people with mental health problems, who are claiming Employment Support Allowance, find paid work. The scheme provided employment support based on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model, alongside the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. The evaluation shows that across the different participant groups, and across the pilot sites, there was considerable positivity about the IPS and IAPT service, including in those sites that did not already have a similar service in place. The report outlines a series of recommendations, including: enhancing the partnership relationship between IPS and IAPT providers; enhancing parallel provision of IPS and IAPT services; enhancing partnership working with Jobcentre Plus; and considering broadening of eligibility criteria. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Horses for courses

Author:
ANDREWS Crispin
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, January/February 2015, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Equine-assisted psychotherapy can help people with mental ill health to develop and understanding of their condition and the issues that may have triggered it. A horse handler and psychotherapist who run equine-assisted psychotherapy sessions talk about how the therapy works in practice. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Emotional mirrors: equine therapy

Author:
DAMPSEY Liz
Journal article citation:
Addiction Today, 24(139), November 2012, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
Addiction Recovery Foundation

Sierra Tucson is a behavioural health treatment centre and psychiatric hospital which has pioneered equine-assisted therapy, or EAP. Many who admit for treatment are dealing with various kinds of addictions, mood disorders, traumas, eating disorders, and pain management issues. Every other week, patients participate in group EAP, which is part of a Therapeutic and Recreational Activities Programme. This article describes the role that horses can play in the recovery process for patients struggling with behavioural and mental health issues. It argues that horses can sense the feelings in us that are often out of our conscious awareness and mirror our feelings back to us through their body language. Case examples are provided to demonstrate how patients and therapists can work with horses.

Journal article

Therapeutic activities and psychological interventions by cognitive behavioural and psychodynamic therapists working with medically unexplained symptoms: a qualitative study

Author:
LUCA Maria
Journal article citation:
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 12(2), 2012, pp.118-127.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), or signs of physical malfunction that cannot be accounted for by a physical disorder, weighs heavily on NHS resources and are difficult for psychological therapists to work with. The belief of some MUS clients that their symptoms are purely physical perpetuates this difficulty. The aim of this paper is to report on therapeutic activities and psychological interventions used to treat MUS clients by experienced cognitive behavioural and psychodynamic therapists. Twelve in-depth, semi-structured, qualitative interviews with psychotherapists, recruited from 2 NHS Departments, were conducted. Interview transcripts were analysed using grounded theory. The findings showed that therapists from 2 modalities share the following activities and interventions: working together with clients; sensitive, empathic responding and building trust; being flexible with techniques; keeping an open mind; and multi-disciplinary cooperation. They also use a number of modality specific interventions which differentiate them from their colleagues. While the therapists spoke of the difficulty that experienced in engaging MUS clients psychologically, they also felt that working together with clients produced more positive outcomes.

Journal article

Long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in complex mental disorders: update of a meta-analysis

Authors:
LEICHSENRING Falk, RABUNG Sven
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 199(1), July 2011, pp.15-22.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Psychodynamic psychotherapy is an umbrella concept encompassing treatments that include supportive-interpretive psychotherapeutic interventions. This meta-analysis focused on its use in complex mental disorders (defined as personality disorders, chronic mental disorders or multiple mental disorders). A literature search was used to identify relevant studies, and 10 controlled trial studies were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria, including psychodynamic psychotherapy lasting for at least one year or 50 sessions. The article discusses the analysis of the studies, including comparison of the effects of long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy with other forms of psychotherapy. The authors conclude that the analysis showed that long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy was superior to less intensive methods of psychotherapy in complex mental disorders, and that there were positive correlations between outcome and duration of therapy. They note that further research on long-term psychotherapy is needed.

Journal article

Systematic review of practice-based research on psychological therapies in routine clinic settings

Authors:
CAHILL Jane, BARKHAM Michael, STILES William B.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 49(4), November 2010, pp.421-453.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Published material on practice-based research was reviewed to compare results with benchmarks derived from efficacy studies. Database searches were undertaken to identify research published in English between January 1990 and December 2008, and screening processes resulted in the selection of 31 eligible studies to be included in the quality review. These were quality assessed using an adapted version of a checklist designed for the appraisal of both randomised and non-randomised studies of healthcare interventions, and the article includes a table listing the studies, their main features and quality ratings. The authors concluded that the results showed that psychological treatment conducted in routine clinic settings is effective for a range of client problems, particularly common mental health problems, but that the result of comparisons with efficacy benchmarks is dependent on the outcome index used.

Journal article

Controlling, avoiding, or protecting the object: three reactions to the breakdown of psychic retreats

Author:
WASKA Robert
Journal article citation:
Psychoanalytic Social Work, 16(1), January 2009, pp.58-75.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Asserting that in working psychoanalytically it is common to encounter patients who need to carefully manage their immediate objects, and focusing on cases in which the notion of a psychic retreat helping the patient avoid the anxieties of paranoid and depressive positions has been only partly functional, the author uses case material to discuss the clinical difficulties faced with certain patients and their struggles with failure to win their object's love, acceptance, or forgiveness.

Book Full text available online for free

Talking therapies explained

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
32p.
Place of publication:
London

Talking therapies can help people to work out how to deal with negative thoughts and feelings and to make positive changes. They can help people who are feeling distressed by difficult events in their lives as well as people with a mental health problem. This booklet is aimed at anyone who wants to know more about different types of talking therapies, also referred to as counselling, psychological treatments, and psychotherapies. The booklet explains more about talking therapies and includes the experiences of people who have used them. It also advises how to find and choose a therapist, and where to look for more information.

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