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Journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

Publisher:
Blackwell Publishing

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry is published by Blackwell Publishing Asia on behalf of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) and includes high quality, peer-reviewed, original research articles, reviews and case reports in the field of psychiatry. Coverage on Social Care Online from this journal is limited to relevant systematic reviews only.

Journal

Social Psychiatry

Book

Mental disorders: challenging prejudice

Author:
ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
10p.
Place of publication:
London

Introduction to a series of booklets describing a range of mental health problems, aiming to make people more understanding of what these are and of the people who suffer from them.

Book

Reasoning about madness

Author:
WING J.K
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication year:
1978
Pagination:
265p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oxford
Journal article

Getting heard

Author:
ZUCCHELLI Fabio
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, January/February 2014, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Hearing Voices Movement has become established in the UK and provides an alternative to the traditional psychiatric view to what hearing voices means. This article provides a brief history of the movement and the development of the Network in the UK. It also looks at how the approach works within mental health services and with practitioners. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Importance of specialisation in psychiatric services. Commentary on... How did we let it come to this?

Author:
KILLASPY Helen
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 36(10), October 2012, pp.364-365.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

In his editorial (ibid, pp.361-363), George Lodge makes a plea for continuity of care, making a case that the increased specialisation of mental healthcare over recent years has led to fragmentation of patient care. This response argues that continuity of care is not a straightforward concept and its relationship to clinical outcome is not established. Three arguments are presented: difficulties with the concept of continuity of care; specialisation as a reason for celebration; and ensuring efficiency in service delivery. It concludes that the increased specialisation of mental healthcare reflects an evolving evidence base that has increased our understanding of mental illness and the treatments and delivery systems that are most effective. In other words, specialisation is the sign of a progressive field.

Journal article

Turning the tables

Author:
SLOCOMBE Will
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, September 2012, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

A psychiatrist called Isabel Wilson (1895-1982) designed and created a group of table mats for a group of her colleagues. These table mats called, ‘Table Mats of the Famously Insane’, depicted various characters who might be called ‘famous’ and ‘insane’, including George III, an Egyptian god, and King Lear. They were accompanied by coasters designed around the topic of ‘causes and cures’ including drugs, the moon, and psychotherapy. Inspired by this story, CorpoArt, a small service user venture was commissioned to design their own set of table mats on the theme of famous psychiatrists and ‘causes and cures’. The aim was to introduce them to something of the history of psychiatry and how far it has come, and also to allow them to articulate their own experiences of treatment. The resulting mats are varied and interesting. Some focus on the designs of Wilson’s original mats. Another focuses on the ways in which mental health problems are ‘hidden’. Others are inspired by things that help people to cope, including activities such as cycling and the role of the mother. These mats may serve as a useful springboard into a conversation between service users and mental health professionals.

Book

An uneasy dwelling: the story of the Philadelphia Association community houses

Author:
GORDON Paul
Publisher:
PCCS Books
Publication year:
2010
Place of publication:
Ross-on-Wye

The Philadelphia Association has been providing places of asylum for over 40 years. Hundreds of men and women, whether formally designated ‘mentally ill’, or experiencing serious emotional distress, have entered a PA community house and been allowed to “go through whatever they have to go through”, in their own time and in their own way, free from the interventions of psychiatry or family. Despite the longevity and the radically different nature of the project, little has been written about the work. This book is an attempt to correct that. It is in part a history of the houses but also an account of how the houses work today and an exploration of their underpinning ethos. The most famous of the houses was the first, Kingsley Hall, which opened in 1965 and which has come to have an almost iconic status in the world of what has come to be called critical psychiatry. More than 15 houses have been run under PA auspices. In the past the PA was most closely identified with one of its founders, the highly public figure RD Laing. This book is an attempt to explain more about the PA and reveal misperceptions.

Journal article

Psyche, soma, and science studies: new directions in the sociology of mental health and illness

Author:
PICKERSGILL Martyn D.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 19(4), August 2010, pp.382-392.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

This article aims to introduce science and technology studies (STS) to mental health stakeholders, particularly sociologists of mental health, and to encourage dialogue between disciplines and communities. STS is explicitly concerned with the relationship between science and society and centres on the sociological, anthropological, philosophical, historical and political analysis of science and technology and, increasingly, medicine. The author first discusses the core concerns of STS and then some of the existing contributions STS has made to mainstream medical sociology are outlined, with emphasis on genetics, medicine and society. This is used to provide insights into how STS and the sociology of mental health might better engage with one another and illustrates some of the scholarly gains that can emerge. Existing research situated at the intersections of STS and the sociology of mental health is analysed. The author concludes that an emphasis on the sociology of psychiatric knowledge and application, drawing on STS, the sociology of mental health, and inclusive of the insights of both mental health professionals and service users, has considerable potential to afford intellectual, practical and political benefit for scholarly and practitioner communities and to those living with psychopathology.

Journal

Psychiatrist (The)

Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The Psychiatrist publishes news and articles on developments in psychiatric practice and service provision. This journal is indexed and abstracted selectively on Social Care Online.

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