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Book

Preventing mental illness

Author:
Newton Jennifer
Publisher:
Routledge & Kegan Paul
Publication year:
1988
Pagination:
275p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Targeting suicide - qualitative analysis of suicide prevention strategy documents in England and Finland

Authors:
SOLIN Pia, NIKANDER Pirjo
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 16(1), March 2011, pp.5-14.
Publisher:
Emerald

In a policy context, suicide is not easily defined, understood or prevented. It leaves a long-lasting mental and social burden on those left behind, as well as direct consequences on the health sector and society as a whole. The means policy itself is often difficult to turn into action. This review details the interpretative repertoires found in the suicide prevention strategies of both England and Finland, and examines their potential functions and audiences. In both nations, the political repertoire was formed from four themes: the public health epidemiology; the everyday; the preventive action; and the reflective repertoires. The paper outlines the polyphonic and multi-layered nature of these policy documents and how different repertoires may be used for various functions. The paper concludes that, while the polyphonic nature of policy documents is necessary to reach a wider readership and to capture suicide as a controversial phenomenon, its argumentative style may also undermine some of the measures and actions recommended by policy itself.

Journal article

Mental health and firearms in community-based surveys: implications for suicide prevention

Authors:
SORENSON Susan B., VITTES Katherine A.
Journal article citation:
Evaluation Review, 32(3), June 2008, pp.239-256.
Publisher:
Sage

Suicide rates in the United States are higher among those who own or live in a household with a hand gun. This article examines the association between hand gun ownership and mental health, another risk factor for suicide. Data from the General Social Survey, a series of surveys of U.S. adults, are analyzed to compare general emotional and mental health, sadness and depression, functional mental health, and mental health help seeking among gun owners, persons who do not own but live in a household with a gun, and those who do not own a gun. After taking into account a few basic demographic characteristics associated with both variables, there appears to be no association between mental health and gun ownership. Nor is there any association between mental health and living in a household with a firearm. Findings suggest that the high risk of suicide among those who own or live in a household with a gun is not related to poor mental health. Implications for prevention are discussed.

Journal article

At the mercy of the law

Author:
SONE Kendra
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 18.10.90, 1990, pp.28-30.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The Home Office wants social services to stop mentally ill people going to prison, but the system to it is falling down.

Book

Epidemiology and the prevention of mental disorders

Editors:
COOPER Brian, HELGASON Tomas
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
367p., diags., bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Gives an overview of prevention in psychiatry: identifying incidence of mental illness; assessing risk factors; protecting vulnerable groups; and promoting healthier public policies.

Book Full text available online for free

Food for thought: mental health and nutrition briefing

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

This briefing focuses on how nutrition can be effectively integrated into public health strategies to protect and improve mental health and emotional wellbeing. It discusses what is known about the relationship between nutrition and mental health, looks at foods that have a negative effect on mental health and the role of food in preventing mental health problems. It also presents evidence of links between diet and the mental health conditions of depression, schizophrenia, dementia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The briefing makes nine policy recommendations. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Perception of mattering and suicide ideation in the Australian working population: evidence from a cross-sectional survey

Authors:
MILNER A., PAGE K.M., LAMONTAGNE A.D.
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 52(5), 2016, pp.615-621.
Publisher:
Springer

Thoughts about suicide are a risk factor for suicide deaths and attempts and are associated with a range of mental health outcomes. While there is considerable knowledge about risk factors for suicide ideation, there is little known about protective factors. The current study sought to understand the role of perceived mattering to others as a protective factor for suicide in a working sample of Australians using a cross-sectional research design. Logistic regression analysis indicated that people with a higher perception that they mattered had lower odds of suicide ideation than those with lower reported mattering, after controlling for psychological distress, demographic and relationship variables. These results indicate the importance of further research and intervention studies on mattering as a lever for reducing suicidality. Understanding more about protective factors for suicide ideation is important as this may prevent future adverse mental health and behavioural outcomes. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Focus on: people with mental ill health and hospital use: exploring disparities in hospital use for physical healthcare

Authors:
DORNING Holly, DAVIES Alisha, BLUNT Ian
Publisher:
QualityWatch
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
49
Place of publication:
London

Using hospital data, this study calculates the emergency and planned hospital activity rates for people with mental ill health, and examines how this changed over a five-year period (2009/10 to 2013/14) compared with a reference population. It also looks at what other factors, beyond mental ill health, are contributing to the differences. It examines whether people with mental ill health have more potentially preventable hospital admissions than those without mental ill health and explores whether people with mental ill health are more likely to have an emergency rather than a planned admission or stay longer in hospital for common physical healthcare procedures than those without mental ill health. The report shows that people with mental ill health use more emergency hospital care than those without mental ill health. In 2013/14, this was 3.2 times the accident and emergency (A&E) attendances and 4.9 times the emergency inpatient admissions. However, only a small part of this emergency care was explicitly to support mental health needs and deprivation is strongly associated with hospital use. The report also reveals that people with mental ill health had 3.6 times more potentially preventable emergency admissions than those without mental ill health in 2013/14. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Talk to me 2: suicide and self harm prevention strategy and action plan for Wales: consultation document

Author:
WALES. Welsh Government
Publisher:
Welsh Government
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
Cardiff

A consultation document, seeking views on the national action plan to reduce suicide and self-harm in Wales. The plan sets out the strategic aims and objectives for the period 2014- 2019. It identifies priority people, places and actions and sets out how to deliver action nationally and locally. The consultation period ends on 5 March 2015. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Preventing suicide: a global imperative

Author:
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
Publisher:
World Health Organization
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
89
Place of publication:
Geneva

This report provides a global knowledge base on suicide and suicide attempts as well as actionable steps for countries. It aims to encourage and support countries to develop or strengthen comprehensive suicide prevention strategies in a multisectoral public health approach. It proposes practical guidance on strategic actions that governments can take on the basis of their resources and existing suicide prevention activities. Over 800,000 people die due to suicide every year and it is the second leading cause of death in 15-29-year-olds. There are indications that for each adult who died of suicide there may have been more than 20 others attempting suicide. The report argues that suicides are preventable and that an effective strategy for preventing suicides and suicide attempts is to restrict access to the most common means, including pesticides, firearms and certain medications. Health-care services need to incorporate suicide prevention as a core component while early identification and effective management are key to ensuring that people receive the care they need. The report recognises that communities play a critical role in suicide prevention and can provide social support to vulnerable individuals and engage in follow-up care, fight stigma and support those bereaved by suicide. (Edited publisher abstract)

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