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Journal article

Do maternal and paternal mental illness and substance abuse predict treatment outcomes for children exposed to violence?

Authors:
RISSER Heather J., et al
Journal article citation:
Child Care in Practice, 19(3), 2013, pp.217-220.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This study examined whether having a parent with a mental illness or a parent who abuses substances predicts treatment outcomes for children receiving community-based services for exposure to violence. From 2001 to 2011, data were collected from 492 children from one-and-a-half to seven years old and their primary caregivers enrolled in Safe From the Start services. Results indicated significant improvements pre-intervention to post-intervention in child emotional and behavioural problems, as measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). One-way bivariate analyses indicated that children of mothers or fathers with a mental illness and children of mothers who abused substances had higher CBCL scores at intake. Repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed a main effect such that maternal and paternal mental illness and maternal substance abuse were associated with poorer CBCL scores. The only parental risk factor to moderate the association between treatment and CBCL scores was paternal mental illness. Treatment was associated with greater improvement in CBCL scores for children of fathers with, relative to those without, mental illness, and the effect was due to higher CBCL scores at intake for children of fathers with mental illness rather than lower outcome scores. Results suggest that Safe From the Start services which provide early intervention can be effective in improving children's emotional and behavioural functioning. Additionally, the effectiveness of services appears to be robust to parental risk factors such as mental illness and substance abuse.

Book

Children hearing voices: what you need to know and what you can do

Authors:
ESCHER Sandra, ROMME Marius
Publisher:
PCCS Books
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
310p.
Place of publication:
Ross-on-Wye

Drawing on a three-year study involving interviews with 80 children and young people about their experiences, this book aims to provide support and practical solutions for the experience of hearing voices. It is in 2 parts. The first section is intended for voice-hearing children and looks at what voice hearing is and learning to deal with it, covering what influence the voices have, what triggers voices, voices and emotions, and explanations for voice hearing. It also presents the stories of 8 children hearing voices. The second section is intended for parents and adult carers, and covers the history of hearing voices, theoretical explanations in mental health care, non-medical explanations, the role of psychiatric treatment, research interviewing children and adolescents hearing voices, children hearing voices and trauma, advice for parents, and parents' experiences.

Digital Media

My crazy parents

Authors:
MATTHEWS Morgan, (Director)
Publisher:
Minnow Films
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
(50 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
London

For these documentary films, three families where one of the parents had mental health problems were filmed over a six month period. Often through the eyes of the children, the films show how the family is affected and how the children cope with traumatic situations. Issues covered include parents overdosing or repeatedly self-harming and children having to go repeatedly into care. As part of the process the families also filmed themselves to produce video diaries of their thoughts and experiences.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Children who care for parents with mental health problems

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 1.05.08, 2008, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Research summaries on children and parents with mental illness including reports on the findings of a two year study by the Young Carers Research Group.

Digital Media

Child and adolescent mental health

Authors:
WOLF STUDIOS, (Producer)
Publisher:
Research in Practice
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
sound cassette
Place of publication:
Dartington

The field of child and adolescent mental health causes concern because of its implications for  client groups and the disparity between demand and available resources not just for young people but for adults too.  There are many questions in the minds of those charged with helping vulnerable children and their families: what is meant by mental health?; or should we be talking about mental illness instead?; what sorts of mental health problems do young people have?; what happens if they don’t get help?; how do non-specialists access advice and how can they help children waiting for specialist intervention?; what interventions are effective?; what do we know about outcomes and what are the prospects for children if they do not get appropriate help?  This cassette gathers information, from both research and practice, about the state of  current knowledge.

Journal article

Empowering the parent

Author:
RYE Nina
Journal article citation:
Therapy Today, 17(7), September 2006, pp.25-28.
Publisher:
British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

The author explains the process of filial therapy, a type of play therapy which involves the parents or carers as agents of therapeutic change. The article includes case examples.

Journal article

Parental alienation due to a shared psychotic disorder (folie a deux)

Author:
LOWENSTEIN Ludwig
Journal article citation:
Justice of the Peace, 24.06.06, 2006, pp.467-471.
Publisher:
Butterworth

This article considers the shared psychotic disorder (folie a deux) which is often an integral part of the parental alienation process. The way in functions leads to the alienation of a good parent. This article goes against most current judicial decisions and other psychologist's views. The author recommends destroying the folie a deux pathological relationship of the child and the alienator by removing the child either to the alienated parent or an independent party while the child is being provided with therapy and has contact with the alienated parent.

Journal article

Stress and coping patterns of parents of the mentally ill in Israel

Author:
GIDRON B.
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 34(2), April 1991, pp.159-170.
Publisher:
Sage

Stress and coping patterns were examined as distinctive factors in the first study of Israeli parents who care for their mentally ill sons or daughters. The authors surveyed fifty parents of the mentally ill in Israel, examining self-reported inventories of potential stresses and coping strategies. Parents reported their greatest concerns surrounded their child's future and their own difficulties in acceptance of their situation. They reported coping by relying on professionals and spouses, and did not report a significant reliance on natural support networks. These findings are examined in the context of studies conducted in other nations.

Book

Children at risk: in the web of parental mental illness

Authors:
FELDMAN Ronald A., STIFFMAN Arlene R., JUNG Kenneth G
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
299p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
New Brunswick, NJ

A study of children with mentally ill parents and their susceptibility to mental illness.

Journal article

Children in care: the association with mental disorder in patients

Authors:
ISAAC B.C., MINTY E.B., MORRISON R.M.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 16(3), June 1986, pp.325-339.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Report of a study of 31 families of children who had stayed in care for at least 12 months, and of 26 families with children who had been in care for up to 3 months. Information about the parents' mental health was obtained from social work records, psychiatric records and interviews with the parents. The parents of children in care for the longer period were more likely to have received psychiatric treatment and appeared to suffer from more severe or longstanding disorders, as evidenced by admissions into psychiatric hospital and type of psychiatric diagnosis. However, the most striking finding was the high rate of past and current psychiatric disorder in the total sample of parents; this appeared to be an important factor influencing children's admissions into, and discharge from, care.

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