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Journal article

Evaluation of a pilot project for mental health screening for children looked after in an inner London borough

Authors:
NEWLOVE-DELGADO Tamsin, MURPHY Elizabeth, FORD Tamsin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Children's Services, 7(3), 2012, pp.213-225.
Publisher:
Emerald

This study evaluated the feasibility of a screening test for looked after children in order to identify undetected psychiatric disorders. Children aged 4 to 16 in care in the London Borough of Southwark for four consecutive months were eligible for screening. Where the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire suggested that a psychiatric disorder was possible, participants were then invited to complete the Developmental and Well-Being Assessment, which was rated by a senior psychiatrist to generate diagnoses if appropriate. Findings revealed that that over one year, 23 children were eligible for screening, a total of 18 underwent the initial stage of screening, and 7 were subsequently diagnosed with a formal psychiatric disorder. The authors concluded that the study highlighted the unmet need for mental health interventions among children looked after by the local authority, and confirmed the feasibility of a simple screening protocol.

Book Full text available online for free

People with mental health conditions and pathways to work

Authors:
HUDSON Maria, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
131p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This qualitative research project aimed to identify how Jobcentre Plus Pathways to Work may better meet the needs of the mental health client group. The research explored the reasons why Pathways has yielded mixed results for clients with mental health conditions and what helps contribute to good outcomes. Fieldwork was carried out between January 2008 and February 2009 across 3 Jobcentre Plus districts. An iterative qualitative research design was used including interviews with Jobcentre Plus and non-Jobcentre Plus staff working with people with mental health conditions, incapacity benefit claimants with mental health conditions, and service provider workshops. The study focused on the areas of: Jobcentre Plus and non-Jobcentre Plus staff perceptions and experiences of working with people with mental health conditions and Pathways to Work; clients' attitudes towards and beliefs about work; clients’ experiences and perceptions of Work Focused Interviews; and clients’ experiences and perceptions of referrals; and other services and issues in entering and sustaining paid work. Many clients were satisfied with the help they received from Jobcentre Plus Pathways, though many mandatory clients felt that the opportunity to participate had not come at the right time for them. A range of suggestions are made for improvement to Pathways emerging from this research.

Book

Work and the mental health crisis in Britain

Authors:
WALKER Carl, FINCHAM Ben
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
196p.
Place of publication:
Chichester

There is longstanding interest in the relationship between mental health and work. This book suggests that the impact of neoliberal social and economic activity in the UK over recent years has meant the return of potentially debilitating forms of subjugation and exploitation. More people now struggle for fewer jobs of increasing intensity, reduced legal protection and lower real wages. The book, based on recent data gathered from employees and managers, challenges the cultural maxim that work benefits people with mental health difficulties, and illustrates how particular cultures and perceptions can contribute to a crisis of mental well–being at work. It fills a need for an up–to–date, detailed work that explores the ways that mental health and work experiences are constructed, negotiated, constrained and at times, marginalised. It is designed for academics and professionals who work in the mental health sphere, but also accessible to interested lay readers

Book Full text available online for free

No health without mental health: the new strategy for mental health in England

Author:
NHS CONFEDERATION
Publisher:
NHS Confederation
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
London

On 2 February 2011 the Government published 'No health without mental health', its cross-government, all-age strategy for mental health in England. This Briefing summarises the strategy’s six objectives and describes how progress will be measured. The objectives are: More people with have good mental health; More people with mental health problems will recover; More people with mental health problems will have good physical health; More people will have a positive experience of care and support; Fewer people will suffer avoidable harm; Fewer people will experience stigma and discrimination. Measuring outcomes and quality standards are also briefly discussed. The briefing then outlines further work to support implementation, which will be taken forward over the next year and beyond.

Journal article

It's a one man show

Authors:
WARD Matt, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, March 2010, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Recovery has become one of the main drivers of contemporary mental health services. In this article, the authors describe how they used the play ‘St. Nicholas’ to inform service users, professionals and the general public about recovery. Unusually, recovery has been an approach that has been embraced by service users, mental health professionals, policy makers and successive governments. This article starts by looking at the recovery group in question, and the play that was performed on five occasions in June 2009.  After each performance, the audience was asked to complete a short questionnaire as a form of feedback. In conclusion, the authors suggest that performing arts are an accessible to getting the recovery message across, to all involved.

Journal article

Emotional well-being and mental health of looked after children in England

Authors:
MCAULEY Colette, DAVIS Teresa
Journal article citation:
Child and Family Social Work, 14(2), May 2009, pp.147-155.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article examines the evidence on prevalence of mental health problems amongst looked after children in England. In previous national prevalence studies forty-five per cent of looked after children in England were found to have a diagnosable mental health disorder. In contrast, this is to one in 10 in the general population. Carers estimated that mental health problems were even more widespread. Children with mental health disorders were also more likely to have education, health and social issues. This paper discusses the findings and argues for early intervention along with inter-departmental and interdisciplinary approaches. The recent Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Review clearly indicates that issues of access to appropriate and timely Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services remain. However, the introduction of evidence-based approaches is encouraging. Young people's views on the services they want and on what is important for emotional well-being and mental health are important considerations.

Journal article

Can CORE assessment data identify those clients less likely to benefit from brief counselling in primary care?

Authors:
SAXON David, IVEY Catherine, YOUNG Tracey
Journal article citation:
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 8(4), December 2008, pp.223-230.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Studies show that counsellors in primary care see many clients with difficulties of a severity similar to those found in secondary care services. Evidence from both RCTs and studies of routinely collected data indicates that many of these 'clinical' clients benefit from brief counselling intervention. However, little is known about why some benefit while others fail to do so despite completing their counselling contract. This paper considers client characteristics recorded at assessment and aims, using logistic regression analysis, to identify those characteristics predictive of a poor outcome. Results indicate that a number of characteristics are associated with poor outcome; the most important predictors are economic inactivity and aspects of the patient's condition, particularly continuous/recurrent depression, with some differences between genders. However, the models produced were not acceptable in their predictive power. This may be partly due to data quality issues or important characteristics not being available in the data. The paper concludes that being unemployed or on state benefits may be a proxy measure of severity that has an important impact on outcome for all patients, and particularly for males. Some reasons are suggested and areas of future research are identified.

Journal article

Art for mental health's sake

Authors:
SECKER Jenny, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July 2007, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

In 2005 the Development for Culture, Media and Sport and the Department of Health jointly commissioned a study to contribute to the evidence base on the benefits for mental health of participation of arts work. This article reports findings from two key strands of the second phase of the research: an outcomes study providing quantitative evidence of the benefits of arts participation for people with mental health needs, and a series of qualitative case studies of six arts and mental health projects that explored how people benefited from arts participation.

Book Full text available online for free

Side effects: mental health service users’ experiences of the side effects of anti-psychotic medication

Author:
RETHINK
Publisher:
Rethink
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
10p.
Place of publication:
London

This report based on the real-life experiences of mentally ill people taking medicines, highlights the need for three points of action – first, a recognition that side-effects are very important, their impacts are significant to individuals; secondly more choice over medicines and appropriate information sharing; thirdly more investment in the search for a third generation of medicines that are more effective in controlling symptoms and have even fewer and less severe side effects.

Journal article

Psychodynamic psychotherapy: an effectiveness study

Author:
ROSEBOROUGH David J.
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 16(2), March 2006, pp.166-175.
Publisher:
Sage

This effectiveness study used a secondary analysis of data from a multidisciplinary, psychodynamic mental health clinic in the United States. It used a single-group, within-subjects longitudinal design. The psychometrically validated Outcome Questionnaire was used as a measure of change. A linear mixed and random effects model was used to analyze the data. The aims of this study were (a) to look at whether patients improve and (b) if so, at what variables moderate outcome. Findings suggest that psychodynamic treatment, provided within this practice configuration, is effective over time, producing moderate effect sizes, and points to the particular importance of the first 3 months.

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