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Journal article

What is normal behaviour in persons with developmental disabilities?

Authors:
DOSEN Anton, De GROEF Johan
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(5), 2015, pp.284-294.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Annoying and bothersome behaviours among persons with developmental disabilities (DD) is a relatively frequent phenomenon. However, not all behaviour that is difficult to accept in its surroundings should be seen as abnormal or problem behaviour (PB). Some of these behaviours may be an expression of a person’s psychosocial needs and may be considered as adaptive and normal. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Authors attempt to discuss relevant issues in persons with DD which have an impact on their behaviour, intending in this way to define criteria for a reliable differentiation between normal and abnormal behaviour and psychiatric disorders. Findings: Differentiating between normal and abnormal may be a difficult task for a professional treating persons with DD because of the lack of adequate criteria for such differentiation. The problem becomes even more complex when one attempts to differentiate between PB and psychiatric disorder. By approaching the subject from a developmental perspective and by determining the level of the person’s emotional development, insight in subjective person’s experiences was achieved. On the ground of a “good practice” the authors made schemata outlining criteria for differentiation between these constructs. Originality/value: The application of these schemata in the practice made it easier to establish appropriate diagnoses and was favourable for the planning of adequate treatment and support of persons with DD and mental health problems. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

‘Listen, empower us and take action now!’: reflexive-collaborative exploration of support needs in bipolar disorder when ‘going up’ and ‘going down’

Authors:
BILLSBOROUGH Julie, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 23(1), 2014, pp.9-14.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: People with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder experience mood fluctuation from depression to mania, and their support needs may differ during these fluctuations. Aims: To investigate support needed during periods of mania and depression, and when ‘going up’ or ‘going down’. Method: Five service user researchers were supported in a reflexive-collaborative approach to undertake and analyse semi-structured interviews with 16 people with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 11 people providing informal support. Results: Support needs differed when becoming manic or depressed. When manic, people needed a calming approach and encouragement to avoid overly stimulating activities. When depressed, positive activity and engaging in everyday life routines were helpful. Three core themes determined the effectiveness of support: (1) being listened to with active engagement through affirmation and encouragement, (2) empowerment through development of personal coping and self-management strategies, and (3) early action and understanding of early warning signs to respond to developing crises and protect wellbeing. Conclusion: Periods of depression or mania, and lesser ‘ups’ and ‘downs’, all require different support needs. Active listening and engagement, facilitating empowerment and appropriate early action are crucial elements of effective support. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Hidden healthcare

Author:
JOHNSON Robin
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, April 2011, pp.14-17.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Some of the mental health problems that social housing staff have to deal with in their work are discussed. These include paranoia, hoarding and personality disorders. The article highlights how social housing is supporting some of the most vulnerable people in society and argues that social housing should be include in partnerships and joint initiatives to identify needs.

Journal article

Spirituality, mental health and people with learning disabilities

Authors:
FERGUSON Dave, SCOTT Jayne
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 2(2), June 2008, pp.37-41.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article explores the spiritual dimension in mental health care and its relevance to people with learning disabilities. A discussion of the development of a working group to scope the issues in one learning disability service is explored, with practical commentary on the efforts made to gather more information from service providers. The findings from a brief survey are briefly discusses, as well as developments which have ensued to date. The authors conclude that, although spirituality can mean different things to different people, responding to the diverse spiritual needs of service users must take a person-centred and a flexible approach.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Not one word of welcome

Author:
NEUSTATTER Angela
Journal article citation:
Young Minds Magazine, 93, March 2008, pp.15-17.
Publisher:
YoungMinds

The author looks at the difficulties facing unaccompanied asylum seeking children. She discusses the dangers of failing acknowledge their mental health needs.

Journal article

The use of family therapy for people with learning disabilities

Author:
BAUM Sandra
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 1(2), June 2007, pp.8-13.
Publisher:
Emerald

The application of the systemic approach in working with people with learning disabilities, their families and their support systems has grown over the last decade in the UK. The way in which the family, support system and wider contexts interact with each other may affect how the person with learning disabilities presents for help to services, and will also affect engagement, expectations and possible solutions to crises. If the relationship in focus is the person's behaviour in a family setting, family therapy may be useful to explore relational difficulties within the family. This article considers the issues that might benefit from using this model, explains how to included the adult with learning disabilities in the process, and summarises the evidence of its effectiveness.

Digital Media

Being seen and heard: the needs of children of parents with mental illness

Authors:
COOKLIN Alan, (Author)
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
(60 mins), DVD, CD ROM, pamphlet
Place of publication:
London

This is a 1 hour long training film designed for use by staff involved in the care of parents with mental illness and their children. The film is clearly divided into two main sections. Part I shows children and parents relating their various experiences. Part II focuses on solutions and the ways that professionals can help. The stories are interspersed with comments from experts. The key points of each sub-section are summarised in text on the screen.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Worst of both worlds

Authors:
BEUM Nasa, MORRIS Jenny
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 31.10.02, 2002, p.36.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at the divide that exists between the different services disabled people with mental health problems require.

Journal article

Adolescents' help-seeking behaviour: the difference between self- and other referral

Authors:
RAVIV Amiram, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adolescence, 23(6), December 2000, pp.721-740.
Publisher:
Academic Press

This Israeli study examines the difference between adolescents' willingness to seek help for themselves and their willingness to refer others for help. Results found adolescents were more willing to refer another person than themselves to most of the sources of support. Differences were more pronounced for severe problems and referrals to psychologists, school counsellor and teachers. Girls were more willing than boys to seek help from their parents and friends. Actual help-seeking behaviour was positively related to willingness to seek help from various sources of support. The results are discussed with reference to the threat to self mechanism and other costs.

Journal article

Care programme to work

Author:
SEEBOHM Patience
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 3(4), November 1999, pp.19-21.
Publisher:
Emerald

Describes Care Programme to Work (CPTW) an action research project that aims to help local services develop employment opportunities for people who are on the higher tiers of Care Programme Approach. It brings together providers, their users and local employers, to develop ways in which users can more easily identify and pursue their vocational ambitions.

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