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Journal article Full text available online for free

Crisis intervention: the professionals' perspective: a questionnaire survey

Authors:
LAZARO Fernando, et al
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 25(3), March 2001, pp.95-98.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This study aimed to describe the attitudes of the professionals of a multi-disciplinary crisis intervention service (CIS) towards the service they provide. Opinions differed most on issues of safety and acceptance of clinical responsibility. These differences may create tensions within the multi-disciplinary groups and may influence the attitudes of professions to crisis work. Measures need to be taken to address these issues in order to improve morale and staff satisfaction.

Journal article

The care programme approach

Author:
ROSPOPA John
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 1.4.98, 1998, pp.55-57.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

The author takes an in-depth look at a formalised multidisciplinary approach to caring for people with enduring mental health problems.

Book

Promoting care and justice: report of the Mental Health Foundation's regional conference on improving services for mentally disordered offenders

Editor:
NEWMAN Caroline
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
55p.
Place of publication:
London

Contains conference papers on: defining terms and identifying issues; multi-agency approaches; needs assessment and service delivery; and suggestions for core tasks for improving services to offenders with mental health problems and for research and development work.

Journal article

A case for treatment

Authors:
KURTZ Zarrina, NICOL Rory
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 16.7.92, 1992, p.25.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Argues that a multi-disciplinary approach to children with mental health problems is vital if they are to receive the best treatment.

Book

Case management in mental health

Author:
ONYETT Steve
Publisher:
Chapman and Hall
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
279p.,diags.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Practical guidance for planners, managers and practitioners on the implementation and maintenance of effective case management and multi-disciplinary teamwork.

Journal article

Stepping into the breach

Author:
BARTLETT Nigel
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 18.1.90, 1990, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A multidisciplinary mental health team in Barnet consisting of social workers, psychiatrists, doctors and community psychiatric nurses was established in 1976.

Journal article

Living with support

Author:
LOVETT Adrian
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 19.1.89, 1989, p.78.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Describes the work of the Community Psychiatry Research Unit at Hackney Hospital, London, in supporting an independent living scheme for mentally ill people.

Journal article

Coordination, continuity, and centralized control: a policy perspective on service strategies for the chronic mentally ill

Authors:
DILL A.E.P., ROCHEFORT D.A.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Issues, 45(3), 1989, pp.145-159.
Publisher:
Wiley

Describes policies designed to encourage co-ordination of services and barriers to their successful implementation.

Journal article

Multidisciplinary team perspectives on older adult hoarding and mental illness

Authors:
KOENIG Terry L., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 25(1), 2013, pp.56-75.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Hoarding, characterised as animal or inanimate object hoarding, can have debilitating consequences for older adults who hoard, as well as for their families and communities. Because of the complex nature of hoarding, many believe that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to respond to hoarding. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine multidisciplinary team perspectives on their involvement in older adult hoarding cases. Fifteen informants, as members of 4 hoarding teams and representing multiple agencies (e.g. adult protective services, mental health services, and animal control), were specifically asked to describe cases in which their team did or did not work well together to resolve a case. In doing so, the informants described: their team’s characteristics (e.g. team composition, and processes for working together); the need for team members’ increased awareness of hoarding as a mental illness; barriers to providing mental health services for older adults who hoard; and components of successful teamwork within the team and with the older adult as hoarder. Implications include research to better guide interventions, team training to develop common perspectives, and policy development that supports mental health representation on teams and in-home mental health treatment.

Journal article

How did we let it come to this? A plea for the principle of continuity of care

Author:
LODGE George
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 36(10), October 2012, pp.361-363.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Caring for patients in the community has resulted in new challenges. To be effective, different professional disciplines need to work together, each providing their unique contribution but also coordinating their work and communicating with each other as part of a community team.  National Health Service Trusts providing mental health services have found themselves required to provide a range of services: crisis and home treatment, assertive outreach and early intervention. This editorial argues that the administrative imposition of new specialised models of psychiatric care in the community has led to the fragmentation of services and a deteriorated experience for both service users and professionals. It makes a plea for psychiatrists to reassert the principle of continuity of care, which has been all but lost from the practice of psychiatry during the past decade. It considers how things might be done differently, arguing that it is possible to meet the clinical objectives of necessary support and treatment for service users within the community without the current multiplicity of team structures seen throughout England.

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