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Journal article

Law reform - mentally disordered and vulnerable adults

Author:
DAILLY Mike
Journal article citation:
SCOLAG Journal, 205, October 1993, pp.153-154.
Publisher:
ScoLAG(Scottish Legal Action Group)

Outlines some key issues raised by the Scottish Law Commission's discussion paper on mentally disordered and vulnerable adults.

Journal article

Blue remembered skills: mental health awareness training for police officers

Authors:
CUMMINGS Ian, JONES Stuart
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 12(3), August 2010, pp.14-19.
Publisher:
Emerald

Police officers can have a key role to play in situations where individuals are experiencing some sort of crisis relating to their mental health. Despite the fact that this is a very important facet of day to day police work, it is an area that is neglected in police training. The Bradley Report has raised a number of important questions regarding the treatment of individuals who are experiencing mental health problems and find themselves in the criminal justice system. One of the key recommendations is that professional staff working across criminal justice organisations should receive increased training in this area. This paper outlines two approaches to the training of police officers in the mental health field. The first is a joint working initiative between Hywel NHS Trust and Dyfed Powys Police. In this training, all student officers receive 2 days training in first aid in mental health, and spend 4 days at the acute psychiatric unit where they become personally involved in the care of individuals who are experiencing acute distress. The second approach comprised a classroom-based training course directed at custody sergeants. The article goes on to consider the most effective models of training for police officers.

Book Full text available online for free

Psychiatric morbidity among young offenders in England and Wales

Authors:
LADER Deborah, SINGLETON Nicola, MELTZER Howard
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office for National Statistics
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
94p.
Place of publication:
London

This report presents information on the mental health of young offenders from a survey of psychiatric morbidity among prisoners aged 16-64 in England an Wales. The survey was carried out between September and December 1997. It was commissioned by the Department of Health. The report brings together the data on prevalence of mental disorders among young offenders from the main report of the survey together with the results of additional analysis of service use, risk factors and social functioning which were previously only available for the prison population as a whole.

Book

Inspection of social care services in high security hospitals: Broadmoor Hospital; September 2003

Authors:
BISHOP Tim, ROMEO Lyn
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health. Social Services Inspectorate. London Region
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
67p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Inspection of social care services in high security hospitals: Ashworth Hospital; June 2003

Authors:
BISHOP Tim, WATSON Alan
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health. Social Services Inspectorate. London Region
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
63p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

The Criminal Procedure (Insanity and Unfitness to Plead) Act 1991

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Home Office
Publisher:
Great Britain. Home Office
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
34p.
Place of publication:
London

Home Office notes and copy of the Act.

Book

Dangerous behaviour, the law and mental disorder

Author:
PRINS Herschel
Publisher:
Tavistock
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
258p., tables, bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness annual report 2015: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales

Author:
NATIONAL CONFIDENTIAL INQUIRY INTO SUICIDE AND HOMICIDE BY PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS
Publisher:
University of Manchester
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
95
Place of publication:
Manchester

Presents data and analysis on suicides and homicides in the UK between 2003 and 2013, focusing on mental health. Suicide figures show different patterns across the UK countries, with higher rates in Scotland and Northern Ireland and a recent rise in England and Wales. Key messages include: the rise in suicide among male mental health patients appears to be greater than in the general population - suicide prevention in middle aged males should be seen as a suicide prevention priority; it is in the safety of crisis resolution/home treatment that current bed pressures are being felt – the safe use of these services should be monitored and providers and commissioners (England) should review their acute care services; opiates are now the most common substance used in overdose – clinicians should be aware of the potential risks from opiate-containing painkillers and patients’ access to these drugs; families and carers are a vital but under-used resource in mental health care – with the agreement of service users, closer working with families would have safety benefits; good physical health care may help reduce risk in mental health patients – patients’ physical and mental health care needs should be addressed by mental health teams together with patients’ GPs; sudden death among younger in-patients continues to occur, with no fall – these deaths should always be investigated and physical health should be assessed on admission and polypharmacy avoided. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Criminal narratives of mentally disordered offenders: an exploratory study

Authors:
SPRUIN Elizabeth, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 14(5), 2014, pp.438-455.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

The study explored the personal narratives of Mentally Disordered Offenders (MDOs) and the impact various mental disorders had on the structure of the offenders’ criminal narratives. Seventy adult male offenders who were sectioned under the United Kingdom’s Mental Health Act 2007 were recruited for the study. Participants were provided with a 36 item Criminal Narrative Role Questionnaire. Smallest Space Analysis found four criminal narrative themes (Victim, Revenger, Hero, Professional), which indicated clear distinctions in the narrative experience of MDOs. The major differences were found to be related to the vulnerability of the offender’s mental disorder. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The Good Lives Model tool kit for mentally disordered offenders

Author:
BARNAO Mary
Journal article citation:
Journal of Forensic Practice, 15(3), 2013, pp.157-170.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The Good Lives Model (GLM) is a new approach to offender rehabilitation that provides an integrative framework for assisting individuals to achieve their goals while reducing their risk for reoffending. Recently it has been proposed that an augmented form of the GLM could provide a comprehensive conceptual, ethical and practice framework for rehabilitation within the specialty of forensic mental health. However, there is a paucity of published literature to guide practitioners on how to integrate the GLM into their practice with mentally disordered offenders. The aim of this article is to present a set of resources (the GLM tool kit) tailored for use with offenders with mental disorder. Design/methodology/approach : Each of the five resources that comprise the tool kit will be described, the theoretical, methodological and practical considerations that influenced their development will be reviewed, and a case example demonstrating their clinical application, presented. Findings: The tool kit can guide forensic mental health practitioners in assessment, case conceptualisation and rehabilitation planning according to the Good Lives Model. It includes some practical resources that practitioners can use to help mentally disordered offenders understand themselves better, including the reasons why they came to offend, and to highlight what they need to change to live better lives. Practical implications – The paper provides clinicians with some structure in applying the Good Lives Model within a forensic mental health team context. Originality/value – Much of the GLM practice literature relates to non-mentally disordered offenders. The paper builds on this literature by presenting a set of tools that have been designed specifically with mentally disordered offenders in mind. (Publisher abstract)

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