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Journal article

Physical health and mental illness: listening to the voice of carers

Authors:
HAPPELL Brenda, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 26(2), 2017, pp.134-141.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Shortened life expectancy of people with mental illness is now widely known and the focus of research and policy activity. To date, research has primarily reflected perspectives of health professionals with limited attention to the views and opinions of those most closely affected. The voice of carers is particularly minimal, despite policy stipulating carer participation is required for mental health services. Aim: To present views and opinions of carers regarding physical health of the people they care for. Methods: Qualitative exploratory. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted with 13 people identifying as carers of a person with mental illness. Research was conducted in the Australian Capital Territory. Data analysis was based on the thematic framework of Braun and Clarke. Results: Two main themes were interaction between physical and mental health; and, carers’ own physical and mental health. Participants described the impact of mental illness and its treatments on physical health, including their own. Conclusions: Carers are acknowledged as crucial for the delivery of high quality mental health services. Therefore they have an important role to play in addressing the poor physical health of people with mental illness. Hearing their views and opinions is essential. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

A question of choice

Author:
NATIONAL SCHIZOPHRENIA FELLOWSHIP
Publisher:
National Schizophrenia Fellowship
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
London

There is a growing concern regarding the quality of communication between medical professionals and those who receive mental health services from them . One focus of this concern has been around how the medics convey information to their patients – or not. “A Question of Choice” surveyed the treatment experiences service users. At the basic level of talking about treatment, and taking steps to ensure correct administration of drugs, a third or more of users reported no communication from their doctor; while about two thirds reported being given no information on possible side effects of their treatment or being offered any choice of treatment.

Journal article

Vitamin D deficiency in psychiatric in-patients and treatment with daily supplements of calcium and ergocalciferol

Authors:
TIANGA Elanor, GOWDA Asha, DENT John A.
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 32(10), October 2008, pp.390-393.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This study examines the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a group of male psychiatric in-patients and follows 16 of them prospectively during treatment with calcium and ergocalciferol tablets. Of 17 male patients, 15 had vitamin D deficiency and two had borderline deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency was associated with Black and minority ethnic background. Improvement in vitamin D status was observed following replacement therapy Vitamin D deficiency may be widespread in the psychiatric population particularly in Black and minority ethnic but also in White European in-patients. Vitamin D level should be routinely monitored in psychiatric in-patients. For those with vitamin D deficiency, replacement therapy can be commenced with calcium and ergocalciferol tablets (containing 10 µg of ergocalciferol), which is safe and well tolerated. All psychiatric in-patients should have adequate exposure to sunlight and attention to diet to ensure that they receive their recommended daily allowance of vitamins and minerals.

Journal article

Prescribing in pregnancy

Author:
PATON Carol
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 192(5), May 2008, pp.321-322.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Psychotropic drugs reduce morbidity and mortality related to maternal mental illness but may also cause harm to the foetus, the nature and magnitude of which is not completely understood. Up-to-date information should be shared as fully as possible with the pregnant woman and a treatment plan agreed jointly.

Journal article

Pharmaceutical patents and the quality of mental healthcare in low- and middle-income countries

Authors:
DE SILVA Varuni, HANWELLA Raveen
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 32(4), April 2008, pp.121-123.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

New drugs for conditions such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, dementia, anxiety disorders or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder might not be affordable in low- and middle-income countries until 20 years after their manufacture. If cheap clones were to disappear, prescribing practices in such countries would go back 20 years. Pharmaceutical manufacturing companies and the medical community need to consider profits as well as providing access to new drugs to as many people as possible. A win-win situation could be envisaged if pharmaceutical manufacturing companies consider differential price structures for countries depending on their per capita income.

Book Full text available online for free

Side effects: mental health service users’ experiences of the side effects of anti-psychotic medication

Author:
RETHINK
Publisher:
Rethink
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
10p.
Place of publication:
London

This report based on the real-life experiences of mentally ill people taking medicines, highlights the need for three points of action – first, a recognition that side-effects are very important, their impacts are significant to individuals; secondly more choice over medicines and appropriate information sharing; thirdly more investment in the search for a third generation of medicines that are more effective in controlling symptoms and have even fewer and less severe side effects.

Journal

European Neuropsychopharmacology

Publisher:
Elsevier

This Journal covers clinical and basic research in the field of Neuropsychopharmacology. Coverage on Social Care Online from this journal is limited to relevant systematic reviews only.

Journal article

Advancing social work curriculum in psychopharmacology and medication management

Authors:
FARMER Rosemary L., BENTLEY Kia J., WALSH Joseph
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Education, 42(2), 2006, pp.211-230.
Publisher:
Council on Social Work Education

In this American article, the authors reviewed current literature and curriculum resources on psychopharmacology and social work. They argue that baccalaureate and master of social work courses need to routinely include more in-depth knowledge on psychopharmacology and provide a more critical social work-focused approach to this content due to the increasing complexity of social work practice, including a knowledge explosion in the neurosciences. Toward this end, seven curriculum modules are proposed, including suggestions for class activities and assignments and application of module content to field courses.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Psychiatric drug promotion and the politics of neoliberalism

Author:
MONCRIEFF Joanna
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 188(4), April 2006, pp.301-302.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The pharmaceutical industry has popularised the idea that many problems are caused by imbalances in brain chemicals. This message helps to further the aims of neoliberal economic and social policies by breeding feelings of inadequacy and anxiety. These feelings in turn drive increasing consumption, encourage people to accept more pressured working conditions and inhibit social and political responses.

Book Full text available online for free

Making sense of coming off psychiatric drugs

Author:
MIND
Publisher:
MIND
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
39p.
Place of publication:
London

Many people want to come off their psychiatric medication. This booklet looks at why these medicines are prescribed, the possible effects of coming off them, the best way to withdraw successfully, and how to tell the difference between withdrawal and relapse.

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