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Journal article

Inclusion/exclusion criteria in late life depression antidepressant efficacy trials

Authors:
ZIMMERMAN Mark, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 32(9), 2017, pp.1009-1016.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: The generalisability of antidepressant efficacy trials (AETs) has been questioned. No studies have examined the inclusion/exclusion criteria used in placebo-controlled studies of late life depression and compared them to the criteria used in non-late life AETs. Method: The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review of placebo-controlled AETs published from January, 1995 through December, 2014. They compared the inclusion/exclusion criteria used in the 18 studies of late life depression to those used in non-late life depression. Results: There were nine inclusion/exclusion criteria that were used in more than half of the late life depression AETs: minimum severity on a symptom severity scale (100.0%), significant suicidal ideation (77.8%), psychotic features during the current episode of depression or history of a psychotic disorder (94.4%), history of bipolar disorder (77.8%), diagnosis of alcohol or drug abuse or dependence (83.3%), presence of a comorbid nondepressive, nonsubstance use Axis I disorder (55.6%), episode duration too short (66.7%), and an insufficient score on a cognitive screen (88.3%) or the presence of a cognitive disorder (55.6%). There were some differences between the late life and non-late life depression studies—use of a screening measure of cognitive functioning, presence of a cognitive disorder such as dementia, and the minimum depression severity cutoff score required at baseline. Conclusions: The inclusion/exclusion criteria in AETs of late life depression were generally similar to the criteria used in non-late life depression (Edited publisher abstract)

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Introduction to the research on: the effectiveness of supported housing and accommodation for people with mental health problems

Authors:
HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin, LINSKY Kate
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
17
Place of publication:
Bristol

A short scoping review of research into the effectiveness of supported housing and accommodation for people with mental health problems aimed at practitioners who work with people with mental health problems. For the review, searches were carried out on organisational websites and a range of databases, including Social Care Online, for UK based research published from 2000. The document provides an overview of the quantity and quality of the research and a table summarising the 20 studies reviewed with their key findings. It also provides a summary of areas identified for future research. The review finds that various models of community-based supported housing have been associated with a range of positive outcomes for people with mental health problems. These include: improved quality of life, more extensive social networks, social inclusion, reduced negative symptoms, increased participation in work and education, increased autonomy, improved self-esteem and happiness, reduced challenging behaviour, increased confidence, and relapse prevention. However, there is less known about the factors which lead to these outcomes and the characteristics that make the most effective types of support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Scoping review of interventions supporting mothers with mental illness: key outcomes and challenges

Authors:
SUAREZ Eliana Barrios, LAFRENIERE Ginette, HARRISON Jay
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 52(8), 2016, pp.927-936.
Publisher:
Springer

Despite the fact that more than 60 per cent of women experiencing mental distress also care for dependent children, little is known about the efficacy of interventions supporting parents with mental illness. A scoping review of the literature published between 1997 and 2014 was conducted to obtain an overview of empirically evaluated interventions and to typify their outcomes. The review identified 19 publications reporting on 9 interventions. The efficacy of programs was apparent and key components used by programs were recognised. To enhance the well-being of mothers with mental illness and their children an increased knowledge transfer in this field is required. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Trauma and young offenders: a review of the research and practice literature: research summary

Authors:
LIDDLE Mark, et al
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Reports on findings from a review of research and practice literature concerning trauma in the backgrounds of young offenders. It aims to highlight what is currently known about trauma within the population of young offenders, and to identify the importance of this knowledge for effective resettlement practice. Searches were carried out using the internet and academic databases, focusing on young people up to the age of 25. The review focuses on: definitions of trauma and the different ways in which trauma has been understood in the research and practice literature; the prevalence of different types of traumatic childhood and adolescent experiences in the backgrounds of young offenders; the effects that such trauma can have on young people in the short-term, and its longer term impacts on emotional, social, and neurological development; the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour, including the extent of their capacity to comply with youth justice interventions. The evidence suggests that offenders have a disproportionate amount of childhood and adolescent trauma in their backgrounds and that some of the impacts of such trauma appear to be linked to offending behaviour. It also looks at the implications that an understanding of trauma and its effects might have for resettlement work undertaken with young custody-leavers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Facilitators and barriers in dual recovery: a literature review of first-person perspectives

Authors:
NESS Ottar, BORG Marit, DAVIDSON Larry
Journal article citation:
Advances in Dual Diagnosis, 7(3), 2014, pp.107-117.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The co-occurrence of mental health and substance use problems is prevalent, and has been problematic both in terms of its complexity for the person and of the challenges it poses to health care practitioners. Recovery in co-occurring mental health and substance use problems is viewed as with multiple challenges embedded in it. As most of the existing literature on recovery tends to treat recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, it is critical to assess the nature of our current understanding of what has been described as “complex” or “dual” recovery. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss what persons with co-occurring mental health and substance use problems describe as facilitators and barriers in their recovery process as revealed in the literature. Design/methodology/approach: The method used for this study was a small-scale review of the literature gleaned from a wider general view. Searches were conducted in CINAHL, Psych info, Medline, Embase, SweMed+, and NORART. Findings: Three overarching themes were identified as facilitators of dual recovery: first, meaningful everyday life; second, focus on strengths and future orientation; and third, re-establishing a social life and supportive relationships. Two overarching themes were identified as barriers to dual recovery: first, lack of tailored help and second, complex systems and uncoordinated services. Originality/value: The recovery literature mostly focuses on recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, with less attention being paid in the first-person literature to what helps and what hinders dual recovery. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Quantifying violence in mental health research

Authors:
HARRIS Stephanie T., OAKLEY Clare, PICCHIONI Marco
Journal article citation:
Aggression and Violent Behavior, 18(6), 2013, p.695–701.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Research into mental illness and its relationship with violence has been constrained by inconsistencies in the definition and measurement of violent behaviour. The author conducted a systematic literature search of Scopus, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Ovid Medline with search terms relating to the measurement, rating and quantification of violent behaviour in mentally disordered populations. The authors identified nine tools designed to assess violence and critically evaluated them. Broadly, measurement tools tended to focus on multiple, but different, facets of violence, which included: severity of act, severity of outcome, frequency and intent, with each suggested as a valid outcome measure for violent acts. The use of multiple sources of information to inform assessment appears to provide detail; however, that detail is then often diluted as a result of dichotomisation of sample groups. This presents methodological challenges for the field. Future studies should give consideration to the trade-off between preserving the richness of data and the difficulties associated with recruiting large patient samples. Studies should move from simply defining violence towards quantification across different dimensions of violence and using multiple sources of information. Abbreviations: MOAS, Modified Overt Aggression Scale; LHA, Lifetime History of Aggression scale; QOVS, Quantification of Violence Scale; CVS, Crime and Violence Scale; Attacks, Attempted and Actual Assault Scale; VAS, Visual Analogue Scale (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Supervision in public sector behavioral health: a review

Authors:
HOGE Michael A., et al
Journal article citation:
Clinical Supervisor (The), 30(2), July 2011, pp.183-203.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Historically, supervision was a common practice in agencies delivering publically funded services to persons with serious mental and substance use conditions. However, there are numerous published references suggesting that the provision of supervision has been declining significantly over the last 2 decades. This article provides an analysis of supervision as it relates to individuals providing care within publicly funded mental health and addiction services. Based on a comprehensive review of the literature on supervision in the public sector, it summarises the current status, definition, functions, competencies, applicable standards and requirements, training approaches, and outcomes of supervision. It shows that the provision of supervision has eroded significantly due to economic constraints and the ‘flattening’ of service organisations. The literature suggests that supervision has a positive impact on supervisees’ stress levels, job satisfaction and competence, as well as on training, quality of care, and client outcomes. Recommended strategies for restoring and advancing supervision as an essential practice in systems of care are discussed.

Journal article

Nutrition and mental health recovery

Authors:
ADAMS Katie, MINOGUE Virginia, LUCOCK Mike
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 7(1), Spring 2010, pp.43-57.
Publisher:
South West Yorkshire Mental Health NHS Trust and University of Huddersfield

This review examines the relationship between nutrition and mental health and mental health recovery. It also examines the evidence that suggests that people with mental health problems are more likely to engage in poor dietary practices comparing with the general population. Literature searches were carried out in a number of databases dating back to 1950 to identify papers examining nutrition in adults aged 18-60 and mental illness or some component of mental health recovery or rehabilitation. A total of 22 relevant papers were identified. The results found that there is substantial evidence to show that people with mental health problems are more likely to engage in poor dietary practices compared to the general population. In addition, there is growing evidence supporting the link between diet and mental health and the benefits of the practical applications of nutritional interventions within mental health services. However, many of these studies are of association and do not prove causation. The review concludes that further research is needed on nutrition interventions that utilise specific outcome measures and focus on nutrition in isolation to other factors such as physical activity. The implications of these findings are discussed focusing on mental health practice.

Journal article

Internet addiction: debating the diagnosis

Authors:
CZINCZ Jennifer, HECHANOVA Regina
Journal article citation:
Journal of Technology in Human Services, 27(4), October 2009, pp.257-272.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

While the internet has revolutionised the process of information-gathering and communication in society, there has been mounting concern in the literature as to the effect of the medium on the individual. A question that is receiving significant attention from the public, mental health professionals, researchers and educators is whether it is possible to develop a diagnosable addiction to the internet. This report reviews this controversy in detail through an analysis of the existing research on Problematic Internet Use (PIU). It includes proposed definitional criteria for PIU, explanatory theories of the manifestation of PIU, measures of PIU, and groups with a higher vulnerability of developing PIU. The report concludes that, irrespective of whether PIU is labelled an addiction, it appears to be an existing and expanding problem worldwide. The report also identifies gaps in the literature, areas for future research, and implications for human service agencies and treatment providers.

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Scotland’s national programme for improving mental health and well-being small research projects initiative 2005-06: implementing a recovery approach in policy and practice: a review of the literature

Author:
BERZINS Kathryn M.
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
47p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This literature review examines some of the international literature to date that looks at implementing recovery-orientated policy and practice through evaluation of service delivery. It highlights both the policy and practice contexts of initiatives, and their relevance to the Scottish context. It identifies lessons that may be learnt from the international evidence and makes recommendations about where this evidence may be used as a basis for Scottish policy and service development. This review has been carried out in liaison with the Scottish Recovery Network in line with their research agenda.

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