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Journal article

Working together to improve access to learning

Author:
JAMES Kathryn
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 11(1), February 2007, pp.23-25.
Publisher:
Emerald

The author outlines a national partnership project to promote and facilitate access to adult education for people with mental health problems. Those working in the partnership are the National Institute for Mental Health in England (NIMHE), the National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) and the Learning and Skills Council (LSC).

Book Full text available online for free

Securing better mental health for older adults

Authors:
PHILP Ian, APPLEBY Louis
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

This document marks the start of a new initiative and provides a vision for how all mainstream and specialist health and social care services should work together to secure better mental health services for older people.This is the first time that the mental health and older people's divisions have adopted such a strategic approach in order to influence change and improve services for older people with mental illness.

Journal article

Housing support for people with mental health problems

Author:
GEORGE Mike
Journal article citation:
Care and Health Magazine, 58, 2004, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Care and Health

Looks at how the provision of suitable housing for people with mental health problems can be improved.

Book

Making partnership work: a case study of the implementation of a joint funding pilot partnership policy

Author:
PAYNE John
Publisher:
University of Bristol. School of Advanced Urban Studies
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
90p.+appendices, maps.
Place of publication:
Bristol
Journal article

The liaison worker's tale

Author:
WALKER Julie
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 14(1), 2011, pp.27-30.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper presents a first person account of someone in the role of Mental Health and Housing Liaison Officer. The role involves dealing with any housing related issues that mental health service users may be experiencing, and involves working with people who are receiving services from inpatient, primary and secondary mental health services. The post is jointly funded by the Council and the Primary Care Trust (PCT). The paper offers insight into a day in the life of a liaison worker, including information about how they work and communicate with clients and their various different situations. It demonstrates that communication is central to delivering good and appropriate services for clients. It argues that joint working between housing and mental health needs to become the norm.

Journal article

How POPP pilots are proving their worth

Author:
NORRIS Rebecca
Journal article citation:
Commissioning News, 10, December 2008, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
CJ Wellings Ltd

Camden is one of 29 Partnerships for Older People (POPP) pilot sites which have received government money to test out 245 projects to improve care of older people. This article looks at progress in Camden, the types of projects they are running under the 'Community Interventions for Older People with Mental Health Needs' and the early findings from the national evaluation.

Journal article

Community Mental Health Teams' perspectives on providing care for deaf people with severe mental illness

Authors:
THOMAS Catherine, CROMWELL Jim, MILLER Helen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 15(3), June 2006, pp.301-313.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Deaf sign language users encounter many barriers to accessing local services and receiving appropriate help and treatment. As a result Deaf 1 people with serious mental illness can fall through the net of service provision. The aim  was to identify and explore the issues involved in providing care for Deaf people with serious mental health problems from the perspective of community mental health teams (CMHT). Eight focus groups were used to explore perceptions and experiences of providing care for this population. Discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Data analysis was supported by ATLAS-ti, (Scientific Software Development, 1997) a software package for coding and organising qualitative data. Five key themes were identified: (1) CMHT lack of skills/knowledge/resources, (2) Communication difficulties, (3) Distance of specialist Deaf services, (4) Joint working between CMHT and specialist Deaf services, and (5) Issues specific to Deaf patients. Findings are discussed in the context of implications for improving the access and provision of care for Deaf people with severe mental illness. CMHTs frequently feel ill equipped to provide care for Deaf patients with severe mental illness. Implications require ongoing attention to ensure a more collaborative and efficient continuity of care.

Book

Mind over matter: improving media reporting of mental health

Author:
SHIFT
Publisher:
Shift
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
London

The report makes a series of recommendations on how to improve media reporting. It calls on government, the media and the mental health sector to work together to improve coverage, particularly of severe mental health problems. The publication is intended to kick-start a debate in the media about the reporting of mental health.

Journal article

No longer a one-man job? On day activities in mental health care in Sweden

Authors:
HANSSON J-H., TENGVALD K.
Journal article citation:
Scandinavian Journal of Social Welfare, 2(4), October 1993, pp.186-196.
Publisher:
Munksgaard/ Blackwell

Swedish psychiatry is organisationally in line with the international development of closing down the old large mental hospitals. As in other countries, problems of provision of care for severely mentally ill people can be observed. An organisationally new field focusing on the activities of daily living is developing, however. This was surveyed nationally in Spring 1991 and parts of these results are presented and discussed. The field is characterized by profound uncertainty manifested in the fact that psychiatry is no longer doing the work alone. Local social services take on a growing responsibility trying to make claims on how to define the work even if psychiatry is dominant, both in organisational and discursive power. Promising characteristics in joint venture units set up between psychiatry and local social services opens up for discussions on who, in what ways and with what means these new forms of care are going to be pursued.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Parental mental health and families: working together with parents

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2011
Place of publication:
London

This e-learning module sets out the principles that support partnership working with parents experiencing mental health problems. It considers how to use these principles to help families affected by parents with mental health difficulties to access and use support. It also examines how to use the family model to help balance the needs of the parent with those of the child when making decisions about child care. Individual sections cover: Partnership with parents; Early intervention and access; Exploring parenting issues; and Dealing with complexity.

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