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Book Full text available online for free

Evaluation of the Shared Lives Mental Health Project

Authors:
HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
62
Place of publication:
Bath

An evaluation of a project to support the development of Shared Lives as an option for people with mental ill health. The project has supported seven local Shared Lives schemes to develop, demonstrate and market a financially viable and commission ready approach to Shared Lives mental health support, and to generate learning about what works. Drawing on data collected through a mixed methods evaluation approach, this report describes the impact and learning from the project. The evaluation has found evidence of the positive impact that having support through a Shared Lives arrangement – whether it is day support, short breaks or long-term arrangements – can have on the lives of people with mental ill health. There are examples of improvements in general wellbeing and increased participation in community life, as well as specific examples where people’s mental health has stabilised and hospital stays have been prevented. The impact goes beyond those in Shared Lives arrangements to family members of those being supported, Shared Lives carers and their families and communities that people are supported in. Although some of the seven project schemes experienced challenges and frustrations and in some cases growth was slow, all saw increases in the number of new arrangements for people with mental ill health and all saw increases in the number of Shared Lives carers offering mental health support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Scoping review of interventions supporting mothers with mental illness: key outcomes and challenges

Authors:
SUAREZ Eliana Barrios, LAFRENIERE Ginette, HARRISON Jay
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 52(8), 2016, pp.927-936.
Publisher:
Springer

Despite the fact that more than 60 per cent of women experiencing mental distress also care for dependent children, little is known about the efficacy of interventions supporting parents with mental illness. A scoping review of the literature published between 1997 and 2014 was conducted to obtain an overview of empirically evaluated interventions and to typify their outcomes. The review identified 19 publications reporting on 9 interventions. The efficacy of programs was apparent and key components used by programs were recognised. To enhance the well-being of mothers with mental illness and their children an increased knowledge transfer in this field is required. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Does forming implementation intentions help people with mental health problems to achieve goals? A meta-analysis of experimental studies with clinical and analogue samples

Authors:
TOLI Agoro, WEBB Thomas L., HARDY Gillian E.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 55(1), 2016, pp.69-90.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: People struggle to act on the goals that they set themselves, and this gap between intention and action is likely to be exacerbated by mental health problems. Evidence suggests that forming specific if-then plans (or ‘implementation intentions’) can promote goal attainment and a number of studies have applied such techniques in clinical contexts. However, to date, the extent to which planning can help people with mental health problems has not been systematically examined. Method: This review used meta-analysis to investigate the effect of if-then planning on goal attainment among people with a DSM-IV/ICD-10 diagnosis (i.e., clinical samples) or scores above a relevant cut-off on clinical measures (i.e., analogue samples). In total, 29 experimental studies, from 18 records, met the inclusion criteria. Results: Excluding one outlying (very large) effect, forming implementation intentions had a large-sized effect on goal attainment. Implementation intentions proved effective across different mental health problems and goals, and in studies with different methodological approaches. Conclusions: Taken together, the findings suggest that forming implementation intentions can be a useful strategy for helping people with mental health problems to achieve various goals and might be usefully integrated into existing treatment approaches. However, further studies are needed addressing a wider range of mental health problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social participation interventions for adults with mental health problems: a review and narrative synthesis

Authors:
NEWLIN Meredith, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work Research, 39(3), 2015, pp.167-180.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

People with mental health problems remain a highly socially excluded group despite international efforts to facilitate their inclusion. Enhancing their social participation is an important role for mental health social workers, but there is a lack of evidence-informed interventions to enable workers to achieve this goal. This article fills a gap in knowledge by systematically reviewing evidence of the effectiveness of interventions that aim to enhance the social participation of adults with mental health problems in their wider communities, outside of formal mental health services. A systematic review and modified narrative synthesis methodology was used. Sixteen articles reporting 14 unique interventions met the inclusion criteria, and findings across the studies were categorised by delivery mode and intervention strategy. Positive outcomes were found in asset-based approaches, social skills development, building trusting relationships between workers and service users, and resource finding to enhance community participation. However, only four studies were found to have a low overall risk of bias. The findings of this review suggest further evidence-informed interventions, and robust evaluations, are needed as current evidence is limited to inform mental health social work practice. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

An evaluation of the 'IPS in IAPT' Psychological Wellbeing and Work Feasibility pilot

Authors:
STEADMAN Karen, THOMAS Rosemary
Publisher:
Work Foundation
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
68
Place of publication:
London

Report on the pilot of a scheme to help people with mental health problems, who are claiming Employment Support Allowance, find paid work. The scheme provided employment support based on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model, alongside the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. The evaluation shows that across the different participant groups, and across the pilot sites, there was considerable positivity about the IPS and IAPT service, including in those sites that did not already have a similar service in place. The report outlines a series of recommendations, including: enhancing the partnership relationship between IPS and IAPT providers; enhancing parallel provision of IPS and IAPT services; enhancing partnership working with Jobcentre Plus; and considering broadening of eligibility criteria. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Determinants, self-management strategies and interventions for hope in people with mental disorders: systematic search and narrative review

Authors:
SCHRANK Beate, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 74(4), February 2012, pp.554-564.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Fifty-seven, mainly quantitative, studies investigating the determinants of hope were selected for review. As well as identifying a number of potential determinants the review reported a range of practical self-management strategies on a number of themes, identified by service users in five qualitative studies. Most of the eight controlled intervention studies reported positive effects on hope compared to treatment as usual but there was no evidence to support a specific intervention for increasing hope in participants with mental health problems. Further research on the causal influences on hope, and the need for theory based models to improve hope are called for.

Book Full text available online for free

Understanding the impact of JRRP for people with mental health conditions

Authors:
TAYLOR Rebecca, LEWIS Jane
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
33p.
Place of publication:
London

This reanalysis explores an unexpected finding from the evaluation of the Job Retention and Rehabilitation pilot, namely that people with mental health conditions who used the pilot services had a lower rate of return to work than those who did not. Quantitative and qualitative data collected during the evaluation of the pilot provided evidence supporting a number of plausible explanations. These included the possibility that there may have been less scope to boost health and workplace services for people with mental health conditions and delayed returns to work due to a focus on the same employer, waiting for a more complete health recovery, and dependency on the service provider. There was no evidence to indicate that the interventions were deficient for the mental health group, nor did the data suggest that the design of the trial was likely to have caused the negative impact.

Journal article

Nutrition and mental health recovery

Authors:
ADAMS Katie, MINOGUE Virginia, LUCOCK Mike
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 7(1), Spring 2010, pp.43-57.
Publisher:
South West Yorkshire Mental Health NHS Trust and University of Huddersfield

This review examines the relationship between nutrition and mental health and mental health recovery. It also examines the evidence that suggests that people with mental health problems are more likely to engage in poor dietary practices comparing with the general population. Literature searches were carried out in a number of databases dating back to 1950 to identify papers examining nutrition in adults aged 18-60 and mental illness or some component of mental health recovery or rehabilitation. A total of 22 relevant papers were identified. The results found that there is substantial evidence to show that people with mental health problems are more likely to engage in poor dietary practices compared to the general population. In addition, there is growing evidence supporting the link between diet and mental health and the benefits of the practical applications of nutritional interventions within mental health services. However, many of these studies are of association and do not prove causation. The review concludes that further research is needed on nutrition interventions that utilise specific outcome measures and focus on nutrition in isolation to other factors such as physical activity. The implications of these findings are discussed focusing on mental health practice.

Journal article

An occupational perspective of the recovery journey in mental health

Authors:
KELLY Mary, LAMONT Scott, BRUNERO Scott
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73(3), March 2010, pp.129-135.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

The philosophy of occupational therapy and that of recovery are markedly similar; however, there is limited research linking occupation to recovery in mental health. This study aimed to explore the relationship between recovery and occupation in consumers with mental health problems. A qualitative method in the form of narratives was chosen in exploring the uniquely subjective experiences of mental health, occupation and recovery. Five members of a mental health support group (GROW) were engaged in semi-structured interviews, whereby individual narratives were analysed through comparative methods to identify categories and themes. Five categories emerged: (1) The recovery map, (2) GROW has just given me the platform, (3) You have to become active, (4) The great barriers and (5) Where am I now ... I couldn't bear it if I was any better. The participants' experiences of recovery highlighted the necessity for occupational engagement in a supported environment. The benefits of occupation included feelings of social cohesion, meaning, purpose, normalisation, routine, competence, productivity, skill acquisition, routine and pleasure. These factors enabled the participants to re-establish self-concepts and subsequently promoted mental health. The findings may have implications for occupational therapy practice, whereby occupational therapy could facilitate a leadership role in recovery-orientated mental health services.

Journal article Full text available online for free

First aid for the mind

Author:
DUNNING Jeremy
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 25.2.10, 2010, p.28.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Mental health first aid courses are being promoted across the UK to equip the public to provide immediate help to people in distress. The 12-hour courses, first developed in Australia, aim to equip lay people to intervene early when a problem is detected.

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