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Journal article

The care programme approach

Author:
ROSPOPA John
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 1.4.98, 1998, pp.55-57.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

The author takes an in-depth look at a formalised multidisciplinary approach to caring for people with enduring mental health problems.

Journal article

Bridging the gap

Authors:
LART Rachel, SWYER Barbara
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 1.7.97, 1997, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The needs of prisoners with mental health problems which are not serious enough to fall within the remit of the Mental Health Act 1983 are often ignored, or at best dealt with by shunting the prisoner between agencies. The authors explain the pioneering work of the Wessex Project which was set up to help span the inter-agency divide.

Journal article

Coordination, continuity, and centralized control: a policy perspective on service strategies for the chronic mentally ill

Authors:
DILL A.E.P., ROCHEFORT D.A.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Issues, 45(3), 1989, pp.145-159.
Publisher:
Wiley

Describes policies designed to encourage co-ordination of services and barriers to their successful implementation.

Journal article

Boundary work in inter-agency and interprofessional client transitions

Authors:
SAARIO Sirpa, JUHILA Kirsi, RAITAKARI Suvi
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interprofessional Care, 29(6), 2015, pp.610-615.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

This article analyses the accomplishment of boundary work performed by professionals engaged in inter-agency collaboration. As a means of building authority within a particular field, boundary work is found to be a common feature of most professional practices. By analysing the talk of Finnish professionals who work in the field of supported housing in mental health, the article investigates the ways professionals - as collective representatives of their service - talk about doing boundary work when transferring their clients to another agency. The study drew on the principles of exploratory case study design and ethnomethodology. A key finding from the analysis of professionals’ focus groups and team meetings indicated that boundary work is employed when disputes arise between supported housing and collaborating agencies. The article goes on to suggest that professionals accomplish boundary work by rhetorically presenting themselves as holders of "day-to-day evidence" of clients’ mundane living skills and serious ill-health. The paper concludes by arguing that in inter-agency collaboration, boundary work building on day-to-day evidence is used to influence the decision on the most appropriate living arrangement for the client. Boundary work is also used for boosting the authority of professionals as representatives of a relatively new and fixed-term agency in the service system. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mind your language – complexities in defining “dual diagnosis”

Author:
SMITH Martin
Journal article citation:
Addiction Today, 21(126), September 2010, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Addiction Recovery Foundation

Professionals often feel isolated when dealing with patients with dual diagnosis, or complex needs. This can be made worse by different interpretations, leading to varying policies across agencies. The author assesses clinical and social issues to develop recommendations. The author suggests there are differences between evidence-based practice, law and social policies, leading to social exclusion of this population. Comprehensive education on the issues should facilitate change. This should be aimed at hospitals, GPs, mental health services, social services, employment services and other relevant services. A service would address substance misuse, risk, housing, social and economic issues, and must have the flexibility to adapt services to client needs. It is this inherent complexity that leaves professionals feeling isolated –adding clear lines of responsibility mitigating the problem.

Journal article

Falling between the same old cracks

Author:
MICKEL Andrew
Journal article citation:
Young Minds Magazine, 103, December 2009, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
YoungMinds

The link between poor mental health and homelessness has been known for some time, but a new report reveals there is still ignorance and lack of action among agencies to develop a coordinated response.

Journal article

Client-level measures of services integration among chronically homeless adults

Authors:
MARES Alvin S., GREENBERG Greg A., ROSENHECK Robert A.
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 44(5), October 2008, pp.367-376.
Publisher:
Springer

This American study presents three client-level measures of services integration, two objective measures, representing the proportion of needed services received and the number of outpatient services received by each client, and one subjective measure, a five-item scale measuring perceived coordination of care among clients’ service providers. Data from the evaluation of the collaborative initiative to help end chronic homelessness (CICH) are used to examine bivariate and multivariate relationships of these three client-level measures to two system-level measures of services integration, one addressing interagency services coordination/planning and the other interagency trust/respect as well as to baseline client characteristics among 734 chronically homeless adults in 11 American cities. Client-level measures of service integration were not strongly associated to each other or to the system-level measures, except for weak associations between one objective client measure and the system-level measure of service coordination and planning, and another between client-level use of outpatient mental health services and system-level trust and respect. Multivariate analysis showed that clients who received a greater array of needed services received more service overall and were more likely to have a diagnosis of PTSD and more medical problems, but less serious alcohol problems. Clients who reported more outpatient mental health and substance abuse visits were significantly more likely to be married, to be veterans, to have more serious drug problems, and to be dually diagnosed. Clients with more serious drug problems reported poorer coordination among their service providers on the subjective measure of client-level service integration. Three client-level measures of services integration were, at best, weakly associated with measures of system-level integration. Positive associations between client-level measures of integration and health status, outpatient service use and negative relationships with indicators of substance abuse suggest they may usefully represent the experiences of chronically homeless clients, even though they are not strongly related to system-level measures.

Journal article

Wraparound: definition, context for development, and emergence in child welfare

Author:
FERGUSON Charlie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Child Welfare, 1(2), 2007, pp.91-110.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Wraparound has grown in stature as a way to provide services to some of the neediest children and families in the foster care system in the United States. With this growth there is a need for clarification of Wraparound's definition, a description of its development, and an understanding of where it fits within the field of child welfare. This paper aims to clarify the definition of Wraparound, as well as its relationship with the closely linked system of care philosophy, before discussing its emergence from the field of mental health and use in child welfare. This clarity is necessary for successful research, evaluation, policy-making, and practice. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

The rapid response team

Author:
LEPPER Joe
Journal article citation:
Children Now, 8.02.06, 2006, p.25.
Publisher:
Haymarket

The author reports on Brighton and Hove's Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service which emphasises collaboration and teamwork to find positive outcomes for looked-after children in a short timeframe. Professionals at the looked-after children clinic meet monthly to discuss cases and collaborative strategies.

Journal article

More than just a check up

Author:
GOVEANS Asha
Journal article citation:
Children Now, 01.02.06, 2006, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
Haymarket

The author reports on the Health Care initiative, which is making sure the emotional health of children in care is being looked after, as well as their physical health. The programme was developed by the National Children's Bureau (NCB) and funded by the Department for Education and Skills, to provide local authorities with a standard, a template and tools to develop these qualities.

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