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Journal article

The relationship between victimization and mental health functioning in homeless youth and adults

Authors:
RATTELADE Stephanie, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29(9), 2014, pp.1606-1622.
Publisher:
Sage

This study examined the relationship between victimization and mental health functioning in homeless individuals. Homeless populations experience higher levels of victimisation than the general population, which in turn have a detrimental effect on their mental health. A sample of 304 homeless adults and youth completed one-on-one interviews, answering questions on mental health, past victimisation, and recent victimisation experiences. A hierarchical linear regression showed that experiences of childhood sexual abuse predicted lower mental health functioning after controlling for the sex and age of individuals. The study findings are applicable to current support programmes for victims in the homeless population and are relevant to future research on homelessness and victimisation. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and housing

Author:
NATIONAL MENTAL HEALTH DEVELOPMENT UNIT
Publisher:
National Mental Health Development Unit
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
London

This factsheet presents facts and selected statistics on the connection between mental health problems, to housing issues and homelessness.

Book Full text available online for free

Still left out?: the rough sleepers '205' initiative one year on

Author:
TEIXEIRA Ligia
Publisher:
Crisis
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
31p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The Rough Sleepers initiative was created in May 2009 by the Mayor’s London Delivery Board as part of the work being done to end rough sleeping in the capital by the end of 2012. This report begins with an overview the initiative. It examines the characteristics and experiences of the 45 individuals in the list who were still sleeping out in April. The next section looks at some of the barriers that these long term rough sleepers face to accessing and maintaining accommodation. The final section begins with an outline of the strengths of recent efforts to tackle entrenched rough sleeping and it then goes on to identify some of the weaknesses and gaps in current provision for clients. Recommendations include working with rough sleepers to build a sustainable relationship of trust. Opportunities for tiered or staged involvement at residential projects, such as taster visits or stays in different schemes, should be widely available for clients. All frontline staff engaging with clients need to be trained and supported to recognise and work with this group’s emotional and behavioural issues. Reflective practice should also become widely available to frontline staff working with rough sleeping clients.

Journal article

Psychological research on homelessness in Western Europe: a review from 1970 to 2001

Authors:
PHILPOT Pierre, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Issues, 63(3), 2007, pp.483-504.
Publisher:
Wiley

This article summarizes definitions employed, observed prevalence, the socio-demographic characteristics, and the physical and mental health status of the homeless in Western Europe. Research pertaining to the causes of homelessness and the societal response to the problem are also reviewed, and the ethical and methodological questions raised by European researchers are debated. A critical analysis of the largely descriptive European research is provided, and some noteworthy exceptions are described. The authors also discuss a number of promising theoretical models, including those that focus on learned helplessness, social strain, and social stress.

Journal article

Homelessness and mental illness

Author:
SCOTT Jan
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 162, March 1993, pp.314-324.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Outlines the research, highlights current views on the definition and classification of homeless populations, and offers some guidelines on avenues which need to be explored.

Journal article

Medical and psychiatric needs of the homeless: a preliminary response

Authors:
SURBER W. Robert, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 33(2), March 1988, pp.116-119.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

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Journal article

Mental health and homelessness : issues and findings

Authors:
BEAN G.J., STEFL M.E., HOWE S.R.
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 32(5), 1987, pp.411-416.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Reports on a study of homeless people in Ohio in which almost one third of respondents were in need of mental health services.

Journal article

Psychopathology among young homeless people: longitudinal mental health outcomes for different subgroups

Authors:
HODGSON Kate J., SHELTON Katherine H., VAN DEN BREE Marianne B.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 54(3), 2015, pp.307-325.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objectives: This study aimed to examine prevalence and subtypes of psychopathology among a British sample of young homeless people and to investigate potential associations between identified typologies and a priori specified current and past experiences. In addition, the study intended to explore physical health, mental health, and housing outcomes for the different mental health subgroups. Methods: Structured interviews including a mental health assessment were conducted with 90 young homeless people aged 16–23 years. Follow-up interviews were conducted approximately 10 and 20 months later. Cluster analysis at baseline was used to identify groups based on lifetime mental health problems. Results: The current and lifetime incidence of mental health problems was high (88% and 93%, respectively). Three subgroups of homeless young people were identified: (1) minimal mental health issues; (2) mood, substance, and conduct disorder; and (3) post-traumatic stress disorder, mood, and anxiety issues. These groups differed with respect to follow-up indicators of change and stability of mental health status, service use, and suicide risk, but not housing outcome. Other characteristics (gender ratio, past experiences) also distinguished the subgroups. Conclusions: Typologies of young homeless people based on psychopathology reveal differences in lifetime and future experiences including mental health at follow-up. Identified groups could be used to tailor interventions towards differing needs. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

A comparison of substance abuse severity among homeless and non-homeless adults

Author:
HUNTLEY Sylvia S.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 25(4), 2015, pp.312-321.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study aimed to determine whether mental health status and being homeless were significant predicators of substance abuse severity among adults and to determine whether mental health status was a significant predictor of substance abuse severity among adults over and above homeless status. Data were collected from 60 individuals from the Baltimore metropolitan area in the United States. Thirty individuals were homeless and attended a breakfast program; 30 individuals were residents of a community in close proximity to the program. Modes of measurement consisted of the Addiction Severity Index Self Report Form and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Data for this study were coded numerically and analysed using multiple regression analysis. Results revealed that housing status was a significant predictor of alcohol abuse and that mental health status was not a significant predicator of substance abuse severity over and above homeless status. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The relationship between homelessness and mental health among alumni of foster care: results from the Casey Young Adult Survey

Authors:
WHITE Catherine Roller, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Child Welfare, 5(4), September 2011, pp.369-389.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Young adults who are former recipients of foster care are more likely to be homeless and to have mental health problems than the general population in the United States. This article reports on a study examining rates of homelessness and levels of mental health problems, the relationship between homelessness and mental health, and symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder, among former recipients of foster care. The data came from a larger study of young adults, the Casey Young Adult Survey, with the sample of 542 young adults participating in interviews conducted over the phone. Approximately one in 5 participants experienced homelessness since leaving care, and those who had been homeless were nearly twice as likely to have a psychiatric disorder, and had significantly higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder related symptoms, than those who had not experienced homelessness. The authors discuss the study findings and make recommendations for policy, practice and future research, suggesting that better preparation for independent living could assist young adults and that access to mental health services should be expanded to include young adults who have left care.

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