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Book Full text available online for free

Fair deal for mental health: our manifesto for a 3 year campaign dedicated to tackling inequality in mental healthcare

Authors:
FITCH Chris, et al
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
55p.
Place of publication:
London

One in four older people living in the community have symptoms of depression severe enough to warrant help, but only half are diagnosed and treated. A third of substance misuse patients with mental health needs do not receive any interventions. It also shows that many inpatients stay in hospital for months without needing to be there while they wait for transfer to local authority accommodation. And mental health research receives 6.5% of total research funding, compared with 25% for research into cancer and 15% for neurological diseases.

Book

Equal treatment: closing the gap: information for practitioners

Author:
DISABILITY RIGHTS COMMISSION
Publisher:
Disability Rights Commission
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
London

This report probed the experience of people with mental health problems and/or learning disabilities of primary care services in England and Wales (1) after international research showed that these two groups were at higher risk of serious physical health problems. From December 2006, the NHS – including Primary Care Trusts in England and Local Health Boards in Wales - will come under the Disability Equality Duty which places them under an obligation to ensure that their policies and practices do not discriminate, and do promote equal opportunities for disabled people. But a wide range of current practices, identified by the investigation, could clearly breach this duty. The investigation provides important new evidence that people with learning disabilities and people with mental health problems are more likely to experience major illness, to develop serious health conditions at an earlier age and to die of them sooner than other people. Yet they are also less likely to receive some of the important evidence-based treatments and health checks than others with the same condition but without a mental health condition or learning disability. They also face real barriers to accessing services.

Book Full text available online for free

Equal treatment: closing the gap: information for people with learning disabilities and/or mental health problems and other disabled people

Author:
DISABILITY RIGHTS COMMISSION
Publisher:
Disability Rights Commission
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
London

This report probed the experience of people with mental health problems and/or learning disabilities of primary care services in England and Wales (1) after international research showed that these two groups were at higher risk of serious physical health problems. From December 2006, the NHS – including Primary Care Trusts in England and Local Health Boards in Wales - will come under the Disability Equality Duty which places them under an obligation to ensure that their policies and practices do not discriminate, and do promote equal opportunities for disabled people. But a wide range of current practices, identified by the investigation, could clearly breach this duty. The investigation provides important new evidence that people with learning disabilities and people with mental health problems are more likely to experience major illness, to develop serious health conditions at an earlier age and to die of them sooner than other people. Yet they are also less likely to receive some of the important evidence-based treatments and health checks than others with the same condition but without a mental health condition or learning disability. They also face real barriers to accessing services.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and well-being in later life: report of a regional seminar programme April-May 2004

Author:
HEALTH SCOTLAND
Publisher:
NHS Health Scotland
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
28p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The mental health and well-being of older people is a much neglected issue.  Dementia affects 1 in 20 people over the age of 65, and depression is even more common, affecting up to 1 in 6 in the same age group. Other mental health problems are at least as common among older people as they are among younger people. Older people's mental health often falls 'between two stools' because research, policy and practice frameworks in the UK tend to focus either on older people or on mental health. Age discrimination and the stigma surrounding mental illness act as a 'double whammy' that disadvantages all older people. Gaps are starting to be filled but mental health problems are still too often seen as a 'normal' part of ageing. There is a notable lack of understanding of the wide range of older people's mental health needs and how they may differ from those of younger people. As a result, these needs are not being recognised or met.

Journal article

Comparing sense of coherence, depressive symptoms and anxiety, and their relationships with health in a population-based study

Authors:
KONTINEN Hanna, HAUKKALA Ari, UUTELA Anitta
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 66(12), June 2008, pp.2401-2412.
Publisher:
Elsevier

The strong negative correlations observed between the sense of coherence (SOC) scale and measures of depression and anxiety raise the question of whether the SOC scale inversely measures the other constructs. The main aim of the present study was to examine the discriminant validity of the three measures by comparing their associations with health indicators and behaviours. The participants were 25 to 74-year-old Finnish men (n = 2351) and women (n = 2291) from the National Cardiovascular Risk Factor Survey conducted in 1997. The SOC scale had high inverse correlations with both depression (r = −0.62 among both men and women) and anxiety measures (r = −0.57 among the men and r = −0.54 among the women). Although confirmatory factor analyses suggested that it was possible to differentiate between SOC, cognitive depressive symptoms and anxiety, the estimated correlations were even higher than those mentioned above. Education was related only to SOC, but the associations of SOC, cognitive depressive symptoms and anxiety with self-reported and clinically measured health indicators (body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol) and health behaviours were almost identical. The variation in the lowest SOC tertile was more strongly associated with health variables than in the highest tertile. To conclude, the size of the overlap between the SOC and depression scales was the same as between depression and anxiety measures. This indicates that future studies should examine the discriminant validity of different psychosocial scales more closely, and should compare them in health research in order to bring parallel concepts into the same scientific discussion.

Book

Social work in health and mental health: issues, developments, and actions

Editors:
HEINONEN Tuula, METTERI Anna, (eds.)
Publisher:
Canadian Scholars' Press
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
429p.
Place of publication:
Toronto

This is primarily a book on social work practice, discussing how one might approach a specific health or mental health related problem or issue as a social worker. Health and mental health are conceptualized broadly in this volume. The health and well-being of body and mind are seen as integrally connected, shaped by biological, physical, psychological, material, social, and structural features and determinants. Clients are viewed as active, engaged agents, with strengths and resources from which to draw in meeting everyday challenges and major life crises.

Journal article

From fear to faith: efficacy of trauma assessment training for New York–based Southern Baptist church groups

Authors:
SUITE Derek H., et al
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 17(2), March 2007, pp.258-263.
Publisher:
Sage

Post-9/11, many faith-based responders expressed the opinion that they were neither prepared nor trained to recognize the mental health needs of long-term trauma survivors. With funding through the Red Cross, an interdisciplinary trauma training program was developed to increase the capacity of the New York Southern Baptist Church groups to provide trauma assessment and support through the Metropolitan Baptist Association of New York. Through a pretest and posttest survey, the training was evaluated. Of the workshop attendees, 91% gave positive feedback and felt the training was worthwhile. The results suggest an ongoing need for interdisciplinary training that includes faith-based groups.

Journal article

Social cohesion, social support, and health among Latinos in the United States

Authors:
MULVANEY-DAY Norah E., ALGERIA Margarita, SRIBNEY William
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 2(64), January 2007, pp.477-495.
Publisher:
Elsevier

The role of individual versus community level social connections in promoting health is an important factor to consider when addressing Latino health. This analysis examines the relationships between social support, social cohesion, and health in a sample of Latinos in the United States. Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Study, the analysis uses ordered logistic regression to explore the relationships of family support, friend support, family cultural conflict, and neighbourhood social cohesion with self-rated physical and mental health, taking into account language proficiency and use, nativity, and sociodemographic variables. Family support, friend support, and neighbourhood social cohesion were positively related to self-rated physical and mental health, and family cultural conflict was negatively related when controlled only for sex and age. After controlling for education, income, and other demographic measures, only family support was found to have a weak association with self-rated physical health; however, the relationship seemed to be mediated by language. In contrast, family support and family cultural conflict were strongly associated with self-rated mental health, after controlling for language, education, income, and other demographic measures. The study did not find neighbourhood social cohesion to be significantly related to either self-rated physical or mental health, after accounting for the effects of the other social connection variables. Language of interview did not explain the highly significant effects of language proficiency and use. Social connections are important for health and mental health, but language and other sociodemographic factors seem to be related to how Latinos establish these social linkages. Further investigation into the role of language in the development and maintenance of social connections may help unravel the mechanisms by which they promote or decrease health.

BookDigital Media Full text available online for free

Equal treatment: closing the gap: a formal investigation into physical health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities and/or mental health problems

Author:
DISABILITY RIGHTS COMMISISON
Publisher:
Disability Rights Commission
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
122p., CD ROM
Place of publication:
London

This report probed the experience of people with mental health problems and/or learning disabilities of primary care services in England and Wales (1) after international research showed that these two groups were at higher risk of serious physical health problems. From December 2006, the NHS – including Primary Care Trusts in England and Local Health Boards in Wales - will come under the Disability Equality Duty which places them under an obligation to ensure that their policies and practices do not discriminate, and do promote equal opportunities for disabled people. But a wide range of current practices, identified by the investigation, could clearly breach this duty. The investigation provides important new evidence that people with learning disabilities and people with mental health problems are more likely to experience major illness, to develop serious health conditions at an earlier age and to die of them sooner than other people. Yet they are also less likely to receive some of the important evidence-based treatments and health checks than others with the same condition but without a mental health condition or learning disability. They also face real barriers to accessing services.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Closing the gap: important recommendations for primary care practitioners

Authors:
DISABILITY RIGHTS COMMISSION, (Producer)
Publisher:
Disability Rights Commission
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
DVD
Place of publication:
London

From December 2006, the NHS – including Primary Care Trusts in England and Local Health Boards in Wales - will come under the Disability Equality Duty which places them under an obligation to ensure that their policies and practices do not discriminate, and do promote equal opportunities for disabled people. But a wide range of current practices, identified by the investigation, could clearly breach this duty.  This DVD is for GPs and primary care staff on the investigation which highlights current experiences and gives practical advice on improving service provision.

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