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Journal article

The pain and the possibility: the family recovery process

Author:
SPANIOL LeRoy
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 46(1), February 2010, pp.482-485.
Publisher:
Springer

The onset of a mental illness is a traumatic experience for all the members of a family. While the mental illness in their family member may be life long, family members can experience their own recovery from the trauma, just as their family member with a mental illness can experience recovery. This article will describe the family recovery process.

Book

Schizophrenia at home: a guide to helping the family

Author:
ATKINSON Jacqueline M
Publisher:
Croom Helm
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
207p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Working with families of the mentally ill

Authors:
BERNHEIM Kayla F., LEHMAN Anthony F
Publisher:
Norton
Publication year:
1985
Pagination:
244p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
New York
Journal article

Caregiver coping with the mentally ill: a qualitative study

Authors:
AZMAN Azlinda, SINGH Paramjit Singh Jamir, SULAIMAN Jamallundin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 26(2), 2017, pp.98-103.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Mental illness is a disease that affects millions of people every year. It not only causes stress to the mentally ill patients, but also for the family members who provide them the care. The family caregivers, therefore need some form of coping strategies in dealing with their mentally ill family members. Aims: This qualitative study aims at identifying and analysing the coping strategies adopted by the family caregivers in dealing with their mentally ill family members. Method: A total of 15 family caregivers from the state of Kedah, Malaysia participated in the face-to-face semi structured interview. Results: The study findings identified an array of coping strategies used by the family caregivers, including religious coping, emotional coping, acceptance, becoming engaged in leisure activities, and the use of traditional healing to help them cope with their mentally ill members. Suggestions and conclusions: Study suggests that the family caregivers should engage themselves in social support groups to learn about and obtain the positive coping strategies used by other caregivers who have similar experiences in caring for the mentally ill. Study also suggests that they should get appropriate training from the mental health professionals in order to enhance the caregivers’ coping skills. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A family approach to delirium: a review of the literature

Author:
HALLOWAY Shannon
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 18(2), 2014, pp.129-139.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This literature review had the following objectives: (1) evaluate the current state of research into delirium management (prevention, identification, or treatment of delirium) with family approaches or involvement, (2) identify gaps and areas that require investigation, and (3) determine a future course of research. A comprehensive search of original research was conducted in six major databases using seven keywords in 2012. The literature search yielded a total of 2160 articles. Criteria for eligibility were met by a total of 11 articles. The articles were evaluated in regards to purpose, sample, research design, level of evidence, variables, and results. The literature review revealed that this topic is emergent and requires substantial additional research. The aspects of delirium care that researchers investigated were diverse and included bedside interventions (n = 3), screening strategies (n = 4), family education (n = 2), and care that employed multiple components (n = 2). Delirium outcomes improved significantly in two high-quality studies: one multi-component intervention and one bedside intervention program. Other noteworthy findings of lower quality studies warrant further examination. The review of the articles did not determine if the involvement of families in delirium management improves patient outcomes; however, the review revealed potential for program development and future courses of research.

Book Full text available online for free

Recovery: a carer's perspective

Authors:
MACHIN Karen, REPPER Julie
Publishers:
Centre for Mental Health, NHS Confederation. Mental Health Network
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
London

This briefing paper examines what recovery means for the families and friends of people with mental health conditions. It suggests ways in which these informal carers can support recovery and looks at how mental health services can give the best possible help to do this. It also provides information about key resources, including the Triangle of Care and a Wellbeing Recovery Plan for families and friends. The briefing paper has been produced for the Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change Programme, a joint initiative from the Centre for Mental Health and the NHS Confederation’s Mental Health Network. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The effects of mental illness on families within faith communities

Authors:
ROGERS Edward B., STANFORD Matthew, GARLAND Diana R.
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Religion and Culture, 15(3), 2012, pp.301-313.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

It is understood that families are negatively affected when a member has a mental illness. This study investigated the experiences and values of families caring for a mentally ill loved one within the context of a Christian faith community. Almost 6,000 participants in 24 churches representing four Protestant denominations completed a survey describing their family's stresses, strengths, faith practices, and desires for assistance from the congregation. Findings showed mental illness in 27% of families, with those families reporting twice as many stressors on average. Families with mental illness present scored lower on measures of family strength and faith practices. Help with mental illness was a priority for those families affected by it, but ignored by others in the congregation. These findings indicate that mental illness is not only prevalent in church communities, but is accompanied by significant distress that often goes unnoticed. The authors concluded that partnerships between mental health providers and congregations may help to raise awareness in the church community.

Digital Media

My crazy parents

Authors:
MATTHEWS Morgan, (Director)
Publisher:
Minnow Films
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
(50 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
London

For these documentary films, three families where one of the parents had mental health problems were filmed over a six month period. Often through the eyes of the children, the films show how the family is affected and how the children cope with traumatic situations. Issues covered include parents overdosing or repeatedly self-harming and children having to go repeatedly into care. As part of the process the families also filmed themselves to produce video diaries of their thoughts and experiences.

Journal article

Family systems and mental health issues: a resilience approach

Authors:
COHEN Lynne, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community, 25(1), March 2011, pp.109-125.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study aimed to understand resilience in people who live with or support a family member with a mental illness. Participants from the Community Link and Network Western Australia (CLAN WA), including 1 male and 14 females, took part in semi-structured interviews. Findings revealed eight recurring themes which indicated the challenges the carers faced and provided indications of the positive and negative personal, family and social factors that impacted on their lives. The themes were: getting to the CLAN WA; accessing help including CLAN WA; impact of living with a person who has a mental illness or problematic behaviour; family and cultural issues; communication within the family; coping strategies and evidence of resilience; social support; and the notion of sacrifice. While there is still considerable work to do in supporting people who live with or support a family member, the authors concluded that individuals living with mental health problems can do more than just survive the process.

Journal article

Prevalence of parental mental illness in Australian families

Authors:
MAYBERRY Darryl John, et al
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 33(1), January 2009, pp.22-26.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The purpose was to provide multiple estimates of the numbers of Australian and Victorian families and children living in families where a parent has had a mental illness. The Australian Bureau of Statistics Victorian Mental Health Branch service usage and data collected from 701 community participants to triangulate prevalence information were used. According to population estimates, 23.3% of all children in Australia have a parent with a non-substance mental illness, 20.4% of mental health service users have dependent children and 14.4% of the community study participants report having at least one parent with a mental illness. The multiple prevalence estimates of the numbers of children in families with parental mental illness provide fundamental information for psychiatric policy, planning and programming.

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