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Evaluation of the Shared Lives Mental Health Project

Authors:
HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
62
Place of publication:
Bath

An evaluation of a project to support the development of Shared Lives as an option for people with mental ill health. The project has supported seven local Shared Lives schemes to develop, demonstrate and market a financially viable and commission ready approach to Shared Lives mental health support, and to generate learning about what works. Drawing on data collected through a mixed methods evaluation approach, this report describes the impact and learning from the project. The evaluation has found evidence of the positive impact that having support through a Shared Lives arrangement – whether it is day support, short breaks or long-term arrangements – can have on the lives of people with mental ill health. There are examples of improvements in general wellbeing and increased participation in community life, as well as specific examples where people’s mental health has stabilised and hospital stays have been prevented. The impact goes beyond those in Shared Lives arrangements to family members of those being supported, Shared Lives carers and their families and communities that people are supported in. Although some of the seven project schemes experienced challenges and frustrations and in some cases growth was slow, all saw increases in the number of new arrangements for people with mental ill health and all saw increases in the number of Shared Lives carers offering mental health support. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Implementing what works: the impact of individual placement and support regional trainer: briefing

Author:
CENTRE FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
12p.
Place of publication:
London

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is now internationally recognised as the most effective and efficient way of supporting people who experience a mental illness into competitive employment. This briefing paper reports on the results of a pilot project to speed up the implementation of IPS across mental health services in Sussex through the creation of a ‘regional trainer’ role. The role was based on the State Trainer model that was developed and is widely used in the United States.  A ‘regional trainer’ was employed for a year in Sussex to ensure fidelity to the IPS model in mental health and employment services. During the 12 months of the pilot the number of people using the trust's mental health services who obtained paid work through the IPS service more than doubled the target of 125, with 286 people finding paid employment. Key to the success of the regional trainer was their ability to encourage cultural change, which accepts employment as part of an individual’s recovery, and the use of regular ‘fidelity reviews’ to determine how well the principles of IPS are being applied in practice and to make recommendations for improved outcomes. The findings indicate that wider use of the regional trainer role could help mental health and employment services across the UK to support more people into paid work.

Journal article

Systematic review of practice-based research on psychological therapies in routine clinic settings

Authors:
CAHILL Jane, BARKHAM Michael, STILES William B.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 49(4), November 2010, pp.421-453.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Published material on practice-based research was reviewed to compare results with benchmarks derived from efficacy studies. Database searches were undertaken to identify research published in English between January 1990 and December 2008, and screening processes resulted in the selection of 31 eligible studies to be included in the quality review. These were quality assessed using an adapted version of a checklist designed for the appraisal of both randomised and non-randomised studies of healthcare interventions, and the article includes a table listing the studies, their main features and quality ratings. The authors concluded that the results showed that psychological treatment conducted in routine clinic settings is effective for a range of client problems, particularly common mental health problems, but that the result of comparisons with efficacy benchmarks is dependent on the outcome index used.

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Still left out?: the rough sleepers '205' initiative one year on

Author:
TEIXEIRA Ligia
Publisher:
Crisis
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
31p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The Rough Sleepers initiative was created in May 2009 by the Mayor’s London Delivery Board as part of the work being done to end rough sleeping in the capital by the end of 2012. This report begins with an overview the initiative. It examines the characteristics and experiences of the 45 individuals in the list who were still sleeping out in April. The next section looks at some of the barriers that these long term rough sleepers face to accessing and maintaining accommodation. The final section begins with an outline of the strengths of recent efforts to tackle entrenched rough sleeping and it then goes on to identify some of the weaknesses and gaps in current provision for clients. Recommendations include working with rough sleepers to build a sustainable relationship of trust. Opportunities for tiered or staged involvement at residential projects, such as taster visits or stays in different schemes, should be widely available for clients. All frontline staff engaging with clients need to be trained and supported to recognise and work with this group’s emotional and behavioural issues. Reflective practice should also become widely available to frontline staff working with rough sleeping clients.

Journal article

What are the barriers and support systems for service user-led research? Implications for practice

Authors:
SMITH Lyndsey, BAILEY Di
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Training Education and Practice, 5(1), March 2010, pp.35-44.
Publisher:
Emerald

While the involvement of service users in mental health research has increased, a review of the literature suggests that this does not necessarily coincide with service users having a ‘louder voice’ or greater control over service delivery. The purpose of this investigative study was to explore the barriers and support systems for service user-led research within a local NHS trust. The study focused on an original research project that set out to be service user-led by designing and piloting an evaluation tool to measure satisfaction with care planning across the trust. The paper describes a qualitative methodology that captured stakeholders’ experiences of why the original project did not reach its intended conclusion. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals and service users, alongside participant observations of steering group meetings. Data was analysed using a grounded theory approach that led to the identification of key lessons for those intending to involve service users in research in the future. The findings suggest that there are many support systems that can assist service user-led research, but there are still too many barriers to implementing it effectively; in particular, processes surrounding ethical approval and the stigma attributed to such research by some professional staff. The lessons learned are presented to assist in the education and training of mental health service user researchers or professionals who are conducting research collaboratively with service user colleagues.

Journal article

Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs

Authors:
HACKING Sue, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 16(6), December 2008, pp.638-648.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Participatory art projects for people with mental health needs typically claim outcomes such as improvements in confidence, self-esteem, social participation and mental health. However, such claims have rarely been subjected to robust outcome research. This paper reports outcomes from a survey of 44 female and 18 male new art project participants attending 22 art projects in England, carried out as part of a national evaluation. Outcomes were quantified through self-completed questionnaires on first entry to the project, during January to March of 2006, and 6 months later. The questionnaires included three measures: empowerment, mental health [Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE)] and social inclusion. Paired t-tests were used to compare overall change, and mixed model repeated measures analysis of variance to compare subgroups, including age, gender, educational level, mental health and level of participation. Results showed significant improvements in empowerment, mental health and social inclusion. Participants with higher CORE scores, no new stress in their lives and positive impressions of the impact of arts on their life benefited most over all three measures. Positive impressions of the impact of arts were significantly associated with improvement on all three measures, but the largest effect was for empowerment rather than mental health or social inclusion. This study suggests that arts participation positively benefits people with mental health difficulties. Arts participation increased levels of empowerment and had potential to impact on mental health and social inclusion.

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Evaluation of the Scottish recovery indicator pilot in five health board areas

Authors:
McLEAN Joanne, WHITEHEAD Indiya
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This Research Findings paper is based on the evaluation of the Scottish Recovery Indicator (SRI) which was piloted in five health board areas in Scotland. The SRI enables services to examine whether individuals who use services and their carers’ needs are met in terms of their rights to equality, social inclusion and support to recover.

Book Full text available online for free

Evaluation of the Scottish recovery indicator pilot in five health board areas in Scotland

Authors:
McLEAN Joanne, WHITEHEAD Indiya
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
81p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This evaluation is concerned with the Scottish Recovery Indicator (SRI). The SRI enables the assessment of whether and how organisations, and those who work in them, are ensuring that individuals who use their services and their carers’ needs are met in terms of their rights to equality, social inclusion and support to recover. The SRI data is collected from a range of sources, including: assessments and care plans, service information, policies and procedures and interviews with service providers and service users. The evaluation objectives are to assess the relevance and appropriateness of the tool to a variety of settings, identify what preparation organisations and individuals need before using the tool and how best the tool should be used, identify whether the tool may be able to measure changes in services and the potential for the use of SRI as a means of promoting change, and to assess whether service users and carers feel added benefit from being involved in the piloting of SRI. The evaluation explored and reviewed the developmental process of the SRI from the perspectives of all of the groups of individuals involved and included local pilot site group discussions, documentary analysis of a completed SRIs and interviews with SRI administrators, service-user and service-provider group participants, a review of any action planning documentation and focus groups with those involved in action planning/implementing change.

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Plan 2 Change: evaluation final report

Authors:
McLEAN Joanne, SCHINKEL Marguerite, STEVENSON Ruth
Publisher:
Scottish Development Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
60p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Development Centre for Mental Health (SDC) was commissioned by the Craigmillar Pilot Peer Support Service Steering Group to undertake an evaluation of Plan2Change. Plan2Change is an innovative project based in Craigmillar where a gap in access to support services for those who have considerable mental health difficulties and related life problems has been identified between primary and secondary care. Plan2Change offers a recovery oriented service and is staffed by Peer Support Workers who have lived experience of mental health problems and are able to use their own experiences of recovery to help others to recover. The aims of the evaluation were to assess the impact of the Plan2Change and inform the future development and sustainability of Plan2Change. Impacts are likely to be seen for individual service users, Peer Support Workers and other staff, and the wider service and support system within the Craigmillar community. A theories of change methodology was used to conduct the evaluation over three phases: baseline, impact and reflection. This comprised a broad review of context and systems, as well as in-depth interviews (by phone and face-to-face), workshops, and satisfaction questionnaires.

Book Full text available online for free

National programme for improving mental health and well-being small research projects initiative 2006: making an impact: exploring how to measure the mental health impacts of working in a social firm

Authors:
McDERMID Leona, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This study aimed to begin to support the development of an evidence base for mental health improvement through employment in Social Firms, by identifying potential indicators and ways of measuring mental health impacts. A brief literature review was undertaken of studies and publications, from peer reviewed and internet sources, relating to indicators for measuring mental health impacts of working in a Social Firm. Workshop discussions and interviews were held with Social Firms’ managers and service users working in Social Firms to inform the choice of indicators and tools.

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