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Journal article

The grass on the other side

Author:
LESTON Jean
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 135, September/October 2005, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
MIND

The author discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of home working for people with mental health problems.

Journal article

Employing strong support

Author:
DENT Emma
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 1.12.11 supplement, 2011, p.7.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Having a job can promote mental health recovery, yet stigma often means disclosure of a mental health problem can lead to someone being forced out of the job or finding it hard to gain employment. The benefits of work retention schemes and individual placement and support schemes are discussed.

Book Full text available online for free

Making reasonable adjustments at work for people with mental health problems

Author:
SCOTTISH ASSOCIATION FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Scottish Association for Mental Health
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This guide is designed to provide straightforward information for employers on making reasonable adjustments in the workplace for people with mental health problems. It was produced in consultation with employers and with people who have experience of mental health problems while in employment. It looks at how to go about making adjustments, why employers would want to do so and where they can get help and support.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health, recovery and employment

Author:
COUTTS Pippa
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Supporting recovery for people with long-term mental health problems includes providing people with choices and opportunities for social development and self-determination. One such opportunity, which mental health service users have requested, is for improved support to gain and retain work and employment. This paper is not a review of the literature, but aims to encourage discussion and action around supporting people with long-term mental health problems to gain and sustain suitable employment, which in 'the mental health world’ should go hand in hand with the development of recovery orientated services. The paper considers the current situation with regard to employment for people with long-term mental health problems, and why employment opportunities and supports should be given greater priority. It looks at the links between an individual’s recovery process and gaining and retaining employment, and outlines some ideas on what can be done to overcome barriers to employment and to promote the development of mentally healthy workplaces that meet people’s needs.

Journal article

Lifesavers

Authors:
JOHNYS Hilary, ROBERTS Anita
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 113, January 2002, p.113.
Publisher:
MIND

The first author reports on the work of the Quest Employment Support Team (QEST) in Cambridge and the second author explains how QEST helped her.

Book Full text available online for free

Employment and mental health

Authors:
KHAN Masood, BOARDMAN Jed
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
32
Place of publication:
London

This report focus on mental health and employment, examining the recent national initiatives and policies and the key arguments for improving the access of people with mental health conditions to the labour market, and setting out key priorities and future prospects. The paper suggests that as well as offering a number of social, health and economic benefits, strong moral and human rights arguments can be put forward to support the creation of employment opportunities for people with mental health problems. The paper highlights a number of approaches to improving employment support, focusing in particular on the following themes: the importance of work and employment for personal recovery; the value of approaching treatment and employment support in parallel; the importance of a clear social perspective on health and social interventions in medical training and in the training of psychiatrists; the need for an integrated approach to employment support; the implementation of evidence-based approaches to supported employment; the clarification of the role of mental health in occupational health services; the importance of primary care services; the importance of valuing people’s lived experience of mental health problems; the development of a clear perspective on public mental health and employment; and the need to define the role of commissioning in improving employment opportunities for people with mental health problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factors associated with experienced discrimination among people using mental health services in England

Authors:
HAMILTON S., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(4), 2016, pp.350-358.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Research has found considerable variation in how far individuals with a diagnosis of mental illness experience discrimination. Aims: This study tested four hypotheses: (i) a diagnosis of schizophrenia will be associated with more discrimination than depression, anxiety or bipolar disorder; (ii) people with a history of involuntary treatment will report more discrimination than people without; (iii) higher levels of avoidance behaviour due to anticipated discrimination will be associated with higher levels of discrimination and (iv) longer time in contact with services will be associated with higher levels of discrimination. Method: Three thousand five hundred and seventy-nine people using mental health services in England took part in structured telephone interviews about discrimination experiences. Results: A multiple regression model found that study year, age, employment status, length of time in mental health services, disagreeing with the diagnosis, anticipating discrimination in personal relationships and feeling the need to conceal a diagnosis from others were significantly associated with higher levels of experienced discrimination. Conclusion: Findings suggest that discrimination is not related to specific diagnoses but rather is associated with mental health problems generally. An association between unemployment and discrimination may indicate that employment protects against experiences of discrimination, supporting efforts to improve access to employment among people with a diagnosis of mental illness. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Breadwinners

Author:
PENFOLD Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July/August 2015, pp.8-9.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Better Health Bakery provides people overcoming mental health issues with an opportunity to do work in a thriving business, gaining new skills and move closer to employment. It was created by the social enterprise arm of the charity Centre for Better Health based in the London Borough of Hackney. This article reports on how the bakery manages the trainee baker' 12 week placements, the role of volunteers within the bakery, and how they help their trainee bakers when the placement ends. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Journeys to work: the perspective of client and employment specialist of 'Individual Placement and Support' in action

Authors:
MILLER Lynne, CLINTON-DAVIS Suzanne, MEEGAN Tina
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 18(4), 2014, pp.198-202.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: This paper provides the personal accounts of the journey back to work from the perspective of both the person entering employment and the Employment Specialist who assisted them. Design/methodology/approach: Two people with mental health problems who received help into employment from an employment service in a London Mental Health Trust were asked to give write their accounts of their journey. The Employment Specialists who assisted them in this journey were also asked to write their accounts. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

One size fits all? The social construction of dis-employ-abled women

Authors:
VANDEKINDEREN Caroline, et al
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(5), August 2012, pp.703-716.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

In Europe, welfare states attempt to increase efforts to employ economically inactive citizens, such as disabled people, according to the norm of economic productivity. This article is based on an evaluation of a labour-market training programme for 17 women with mental health problem in a social workplace in Belgium. The study explored the retrospective insider perspectives on the work aspirations of the women involved in the programme to identify critical dynamics in their high drop-out from the social workplace. The central findings provide evidence of a prevalent one-size-fits-all discourse in these practices wherein complex and interrelated processes of discrimination take place that are based on both disability and gender. The findings demonstrate that the social workplace functions as a male bastion, in which the oversized overalls that women are forced to wear are symbolically relevant. In conclusion, the authors discuss and challenge the dominance of the neo-liberal norm of economic productivity and employability.

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