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Journal article Full text available online for free

Wooed by an Italian model

Author:
HAYES Derren
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 24.05.07, 2007, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Anne Kendall, winner of the Isabel Schwarz Travel Fellowship talks to the author about her visit to Italy to study Treste's system of community-based treatment.

Book

Community mental health: a general introduction

Author:
BLOOM Bernard L
Publisher:
Brooks/Cole
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
497p.,illus.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Monterey
Journal article

Shifting practices of recovery under community mental health reform: a street-level organizational ethnography

Author:
SPITZMUELLER Matthew C.
Journal article citation:
Qualitative Social Work, 13(1), 2014, pp.26-48.
Publisher:
Sage

This article is part of a larger ethnographic study that seeks to understand how community mental health practice has changed over time in response to shifts in Medicaid management and financing. In this article, I examine the struggle that took place on the ground in one emblematic community mental health agency as frontline workers strived to realize their ‘recovery’ vision under emerging managerial arrangements of fee-for-service billing. This study finds that managerial reforms conflict with locally forged practices that emphasize self-determination and program responsiveness. By analyzing how street-level workers respond to formal policy in a real-time, situated context, this article gives greater transparency to policies that are otherwise uncertain, providing a fuller picture of how policy is produced in everyday life. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Experiences of clients who have made the transition from the psychiatric hospital to community service provision: a phenomenological approach

Authors:
MANNIX-MCNAMARA Patricia, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 14(1), 2012, pp.44-56.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Mental health and well-being are fundamental to the quality of life and the productivity of individuals, families and communities, enabling people to experience life as meaningful. Deinstitutionalisation, the replacement of long-stay hospitals with community-based alternatives, can have favourable outcomes for people experiencing mental health problems. However, in many cases the community services needed for comprehensive care are not available. This raises the question as to whether the move from the long-stay hospital has been positive or not for health of clients. Therefore, it is important to examine clients' lived experiences of such a move. This study, carried out over the period of 1 year, sought to qualitatively explore the lived experiences of clients who made the transition from institutional-based care to community service provision. Nine residents took part in the study, and the average time spent in various institutions varied from 1 to 13 years. Findings indicated that participants experienced a significant change in their lives in relation to their psychological, physical and social health and well-being. Freedom for self-determination and living in an environment that gives them autonomy is at the core of their personal experience. It could be argued that deinstitutionalisation generated a shift in client experience in relation to their health and well-being.

Journal article

From structural chaos to a model of consumer support: understanding the roles of structure and agency in mental health recovery for the formerly homeless

Author:
WATSON Dennis P.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 12(4), July 2012, pp.325-348.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

The deinstitutionalisation approach to mental health services has shifted the focus in mental health care from provider-guided treatment to consumer-centred recovery. This study seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the effect that the organisation of mental health services offered in community settings has on the recovery process. This is done by the analysis of focus group and interview data collected from consumers and staff at four housing programmes serving formerly homeless individuals with dual diagnosis. There were a total of sixty participants. Findings are presented as a series of vignettes. The author concludes that the findings highlight the importance of understanding the connection that exists between social structure and personal agency and the recovery process.

Journal article

There's more than meets the eye: the nuances of case management

Authors:
SULLIVAN W. Patrick, FLOYD Destinee F.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 11(3), 2012, pp.184-196.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Case management is a vital aspect of community mental health services. Case managers are routinely tasked with helping their clients address their problems in living and other barriers that hamper their ability to thrive in the community. The aim of this exploratory study was to take a deeper look at the nuances of case management practice from the perspective of case managers. Interviews were conducted with 50 mental health case managers from 2 Midwestern states who work primarily with adults challenged by serious and persistent mental illness. The participants were asked to: describe the characteristics of the clients they serve; aspects of the job they like and dislike; and their beliefs about the concept, process, and possibility of recovery from mental illness. The nature of the professional relationship in case management is described from the perspective of these professionals, as well as the methods these informants identify as key to the helping process. It is argued that effective case management requires complex and nuanced professional skills that might go unrecognised and underappreciated in community mental health.

Journal article

Importance of specialisation in psychiatric services. Commentary on... How did we let it come to this?

Author:
KILLASPY Helen
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 36(10), October 2012, pp.364-365.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

In his editorial (ibid, pp.361-363), George Lodge makes a plea for continuity of care, making a case that the increased specialisation of mental healthcare over recent years has led to fragmentation of patient care. This response argues that continuity of care is not a straightforward concept and its relationship to clinical outcome is not established. Three arguments are presented: difficulties with the concept of continuity of care; specialisation as a reason for celebration; and ensuring efficiency in service delivery. It concludes that the increased specialisation of mental healthcare reflects an evolving evidence base that has increased our understanding of mental illness and the treatments and delivery systems that are most effective. In other words, specialisation is the sign of a progressive field.

Journal article

The Columbia Impairment Scale: factor analysis using a community mental health sample

Authors:
SINGER Jonathan B., EACK Shaun M., GREENO Catherine M.
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 21(4), July 2011, pp.458-468.
Publisher:
Sage

The accurate identification of functional impairment is a primary goal of epidemiologists, treatment development researchers, and clinicians. This study aimed to test the factor structure of the parent version of the Columbia Impairment Scale (CIS) in a sample of 280 mothers who brought their children for community mental health (CMH) services, in Pennsylvania, United States. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the fit of the hypothesised four-factor structure and the empirically validated one-factor structure. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify what factor structure best fit our sample of distressed mothers. Neither the one- nor the four-factor model fit our sample. The analysis suggested that the CIS was best understood as a 12-item, three-factor model that identified functional impairment: at school/work; in socialising; and at home/family. The authors concluded that these results question the validity of the parent version of the Columbia Impairment Scale in a community mental health sample of mothers and provides support for multidimensional measures of functional impairment.

Journal article

Go your own way

Author:
MONGER Claire
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2011, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Faced with changes in the way its day services were commissioned the charity Together began a new model of service called Your Way in Wandsworth. The community mental health service provides a form of 'early intervention' though a programme of one-to-one support. Your Way can also supports service users in getting a personal budget and helping them to direct their own support.

Journal article

A suitable case for treatment?

Author:
GILLEN Sally
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, February 2011, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Since the introduction of community treatment orders in November 2008, the amount of community treatment orders given out has far exceeded government expectations. This article looks at some of the reasons for this and also draws on Care Quality Commission research that suggests they are not necessarily having a positive effect on service users.

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