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Book Full text available online for free

Net gains: shaping the future of children's mental health: a summary report of the 6th June event in Glasgow

Authors:
WHITE Julia, CATCHPOLE Roger
Publisher:
Scottish Development Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

A summary report of an event on children's mental health that took place on 6 June in Glasgow. The morning session covered capacity building and the afternoon session covered creative ways of working.

Journal article

Determinants of outcome in the pathways through care for children hearing voices

Authors:
ESCHER Sandra, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Social Welfare, 13(3), July 2004, pp.208-222.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Auditory hallucination, or hearing voices, is generally associated with psychopathology. In psychiatry it is interpreted as a symptom of an illness, with no connection to the individual's life history. In this study from the Netherlands, 80 children and youngsters hearing voices were interviewed on four occasions over a period of three years about the content of the voices and their overall experience of voices, focusing on the determinants for a promising outcome in the pathways through care. The results indicate that the need for care in the context of the experience of voices is associated not only with high levels of problem behaviour and associated negative symptoms of psychosis, but also, independently, with an appraisal of the voices in terms of anxiety, depression, dissociation and frequency of occurrence. In 60 per cent of the participants the voices disappeared during the three-year research period. The relationship between the disappearance of voices and the course of mental health treatment is, however, ambiguous.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The effects of the troubles on child psychiatric disorders in Northern Ireland

Authors:
GILLILAND David, KELLY Bernadette
Journal article citation:
Practice: Social Work in Action, 6(4), 1992, pp.271-276.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Examines some of the research undertaken into the effects of the troubles on the children of Northern Ireland. It questions if the studies to date have been too global and not sufficiently geared towards children from more vulnerable situations. It considers some of the issues facing practitioners and service managers in this field.

Journal article

Relations between internalizing and externalizing problems in early childhood

Authors:
STONE Lisanne L., et al
Journal article citation:
Child and Youth Care Forum, 44(5), 2015, pp.635-653.
Publisher:
Springer

Background: Childhood internalising and externalising problems are closely related and often co-occur. Directional models have been employed to test how these problems are related, while few studies have tested a third variables model. Objective: This study investigates whether internalising and externalising problems are reciprocally or unidirectionally related, whether these relations can be explained by third variables, and how these relations are associated with onset and stability. Methods: A community sample of 1,434 children aged 5.08 (SD = 1.25) and their mothers participated in two 1-year interval data waves. Internalising and externalising problems were examined with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Results: Using latent cross-lagged modelling, externalising problems were found not be related to subsequent internalising problems, or vice versa. These results were also found when controlling for inadequate parenting, parenting stress, maternal health and social preference. When taking problem level into account, externalising problems were related to stability of clinical level internalising problems, even when controlling for third variables inadequate parenting, parenting stress, maternal mental health and social preference. Conclusions: Strong autoregressive paths for internalising and externalising problems were found. Internalising and externalising problems do not seem to influence each other over time in the community sample. When investigating relations among internalising and externalising problems, it seems to be important to take problem level into account. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Growing pains

Author:
GOODCHILD Sophie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2015, pp.8-9.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

As the number of children and young people with mental health issues continues to increase, the author looks at the possible reasons and want can be done to address the issues. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Parentification and mental health symptoms: mediator effects of perceived unfairness and differentiation of self

Authors:
JANKOWSKI Peter J., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Family Therapy, 35(1), 2013, pp.43-65.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Noting that parentification (which occurs when one or both parents position a child to function in an adult role in the family system) can result in positive and negative outcomes for individuals, this study investigated the association between parentification and mental health. It was designed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between parentification tasks and mental health symptoms. The research involved a sample of 783 college students from a large state university in the southern US. It used a range of self-report measures to assess dimensions of dysfunctional parentification, differentiation of self and mental health symptoms. The article describes the study methodology and its findings. It reports that the results supported the proposed model in which the relationship between parentification and mental health symptoms was mediated by perceived unfairness and differentiation of self, and considers the clinical implications of the findings.

Book

Where there is no child psychiatrist: a mental healthcare manual

Authors:
EAPEN Valsamma, GRAHAM Philip, SRINATH Shoba
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
214p.
Place of publication:
London

Mental health problems and worries are common among infants, children and adolescents in every part of the world. This book is a practical manual for primary healthcare professionals, teachers and anyone who works with children – especially in places where specialist psychiatric care is not available. After presenting an overview of child mental health problems, the manual goes on to deal with the various developmental, behavioural and emotional problems that arise in as many as 10% of the youth population. For each problem it first provides a case study and then describes how to find out more about a child with this problem. It suggests what can be done to help the child and their family. It also examines the mental health aspects of childhood maltreatment and exposure to natural or man-made disasters. This book is intended for anyone who works with children or young people, but who does not have specialist training in mental health problems. This includes: primary care doctors and nurses, community health workers and teachers.

Book

Children hearing voices: what you need to know and what you can do

Authors:
ESCHER Sandra, ROMME Marius
Publisher:
PCCS Books
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
310p.
Place of publication:
Ross-on-Wye

Drawing on a three-year study involving interviews with 80 children and young people about their experiences, this book aims to provide support and practical solutions for the experience of hearing voices. It is in 2 parts. The first section is intended for voice-hearing children and looks at what voice hearing is and learning to deal with it, covering what influence the voices have, what triggers voices, voices and emotions, and explanations for voice hearing. It also presents the stories of 8 children hearing voices. The second section is intended for parents and adult carers, and covers the history of hearing voices, theoretical explanations in mental health care, non-medical explanations, the role of psychiatric treatment, research interviewing children and adolescents hearing voices, children hearing voices and trauma, advice for parents, and parents' experiences.

Digital Media

My crazy parents

Authors:
MATTHEWS Morgan, (Director)
Publisher:
Minnow Films
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
(50 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
London

For these documentary films, three families where one of the parents had mental health problems were filmed over a six month period. Often through the eyes of the children, the films show how the family is affected and how the children cope with traumatic situations. Issues covered include parents overdosing or repeatedly self-harming and children having to go repeatedly into care. As part of the process the families also filmed themselves to produce video diaries of their thoughts and experiences.

Journal article

Parents' conceptualization of adolescents' mental health problems: who adopts a psychiatric perspective and does it make a difference?

Author:
MOSES Tally
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 47(1), February 2011, pp.67-81.
Publisher:
Springer

A cross-sectional, mixed-method study of 70 parents of adolescents receiving wraparound mental health services was used to examine: (1) how parents conceptualize their child’s mental health problems; (2) factors related to parents’ conceptualization of youths’ problems using medical model terms; and (3) associations between parents’ problem conceptualization and their emotional or coping responses to their child having psychiatric problem(s). Content analysis indicated that 54.3% of parents definitively conceptualized adolescents’ problems using psychiatric terms, 37.1% reported uncertainty about the nature of their child’s problems, and 8.6% gave alternative, non-psychiatric explanations for their child’s problems. Significant relationships were found between parents’ problem conceptualization and their attitudes and experience with mental health treatment, demographics, as well as with adolescents’ clinical characteristics. Parents who conceptualized problems using psychiatric terminology were more likely to express sadness and pessimism relative to other parents, though there were no differences in expressions of worry, guilt, pragmatism and optimism by problem conceptualization.

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